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Discussion Starter #1
Up to this point there has not been any need to engage the auto transmission in anything other then "D-Drive". But even with (4) Studded Firestone Winterforce tires, there is sure to be a time this Winter (New Hampshire) when there'll be a need to engage 4-High, 4-Low, etc.. So in that light I have a few questions..

I myself drive an Acura TL...but from time to time do drive the FJ...

- When Auto Transmission is in "D" (not 4 but just regular D) are the front wheels the drive wheels until traction is lost...then I assume drive comes from all wheels?

- What are the steps to engage 4H or 4L..I've tried this before but have run into problems where either it doesn't easily engage or I can't get it out of 4H or 4L...and back in regular auto "D"

- What speeds can you drive 4H and 4L (with snow on ground) in and for how long?

I'm more of a hit a button on the dash and go into 4WD type of guy...but with help I might just get the hang of it.

Thanks,
-mike-
 

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- When Auto Transmission is in "D" (not 4 but just regular D) are the front wheels the drive wheels until traction is lost...then I assume drive comes from all wheels?

- What are the steps to engage 4H or 4L..I've tried this before but have run into problems where either it doesn't easily engage or I can't get it out of 4H or 4L...and back in regular auto "D"

- What speeds can you drive 4H and 4L (with snow on ground) in and for how long?
- FJ is RWD when in 2WD mode, the auto does NOT automatically convert to 4WD, that is what the lever is for. You must manually put it into 4WD HI/LOW.

- To engage 4H you just have to be under 50mph and you move the lever into 4H. For 4L you MUST be stopped and put the gear selector into neutral and then put it into 4L. Generally speaking it is easiest to move it firmly and continuously into 4L. Don't stop at the neutral point on the 4WD selector, just go from 4H pull down, right, up in one smooth and continuous motion. If it hasn't been used in a while it might not go in very easily, don't force it. If you have to try rolling forward a few feet and try it again.

- 4H is really for inclement weather (don't just use it on dry pavement as there is no center diff) but is good for ~50mph, 4L is really for tougher conditions so its more like 30-35mph.

Note that you should read the manual just to be sure as I have a 2010 and the 2007 could be slightly different in operation.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
- FJ is RWD when in 2WD mode, the auto does NOT automatically convert to 4WD, that is what the lever is for. You must manually put it into 4WD HI/LOW.

- To engage 4H you just have to be under 50mph and you move the lever into 4H. For 4L you MUST be stopped and put the gear selector into neutral and then put it into 4L. Generally speaking it is easiest to move it firmly and continuously into 4L. Don't stop at the neutral point on the 4WD selector, just go from 4H pull down, right, up in one smooth and continuous motion. If it hasn't been used in a while it might not go in very easily, don't force it. If you have to try rolling forward a few feet and try it again.

- 4H is really for inclement weather (don't just use it on dry pavement as there is no center diff) but is good for ~50mph, 4L is really for tougher conditions so its more like 30-35mph.

Note that you should read the manual just to be sure as I have a 2010 and the 2007 could be slightly different in operation.

On page 122 of the 2007 FJ Owners Manual (http://www.myfjcruiser.com/fjmanual/Owners_Manual.pdf) there is a picture which matches the 4wd shift lever in the FJ I'm talking about - L4,N,H2,H4

In normal driving when in Automatic "D" the lever should be in H2..understood.

But why do they list the lever here as "Front Drive Control Lever" - page 122) but on page 120 it's listed as "Four Wheel Drive Lever"...typo?

What is the 07 FJ Cruiser's definition/difference between full-time and part-time 4WD?

Really for most winter driving it's just a matter of H2 or if needed H4...and L4 for really tough situations.

Thanks,
-mike-
 

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The reason they refer to it as "Front Drive Control Lever," is because in normal 2WD mode ONLY the rear wheels are being powered. When you engage 4WD you are adding the front wheels to the drive train. Otherwise, the front wheels are not engaged. They are engaged by putting it into 4WD (H4 or L4).
 

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What is the 07 FJ Cruiser's definition/difference between full-time and part-time 4WD?
Manual is full-time 4wd (technically AWD since it is 40/60 biased). Auto is part-time as the normal mode of operation is 2WD (RWD) and upon user selection can be 4WD.
 

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There is also a little card in the driver's side sun visor that details all this stuff just in case you either don't have the owner's manual with you, or you are just looking for a quick reference.
 

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Reading guidance on a lot of posts from the senior guys in the forum, and pretty much following those practices, I've come to the following conclusion:

Paved streets dry or rain: 2WD

Snow covered streets where I'm getting good traction pulling away from stop signs, lights etc (i.e. no wheel spin): 2WD

In 2WD the maximum number of electronic control systems for accident avoidance on are and frankly if you're not slipping, the 4WD isn't gonna do anything except turn those off.

Snow or ice covered streets where I slip pulling away from a stop light, 4H.

Roads that are Gravel, Sand, Mud where I'm trying to travel at a 'normal' speed for the road: 4H.

Off road, the beach, jeep trails, some of the nasty forest service roads if I'm moving slowly (a bit more than walking pace) or I'm going over stuff that takes one of my wheels off the ground at any given time: 4LO

The only exception to these rules I apply based on guidance in the forum is to put the rig in 4H at least once a month for a few minutes (I try to do it when it's raining for a bit of slippage) at city street speeds to keep the lubricants in the transfer case and front differential moving.

Hope the real life examples are helpful.

Bob
 
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