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here's a few things that I now keep in a small backpack style bag stored in my FJ. Mostly prep items if I need to be away from home for limited duration.

<$100
toothbrush/paste
extra pair of quick dry (non-cotton) underwear and socks
razor
led head lamp
quick dry gloves
multi-tool ($5 garage sale item)
backpacking first aid kit (waterproof bag)
baby wipes
zip ties
duct tape (folded)
power bars
spork
lighter and waterproof matches

other items I have but exceeds OP $100 limit

backpacking water filter and container
backpacking stove and extra canister
freeze dried food
light weight bivvy bag
pillow (blow up)
 

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Discussion Starter #22
backpacking water filter and container
In a pinch you can use a UV Chemlight, 90 or so seconds and it's good....

Other cheap methods? Bring some purification tablets with you...Tastes like crap.

Plastic water bottle's can be found nearly everywhere including in the woods, beaches, ect.....

Fill it up about 3/4's full and leave it in the sun on it's side. The sunlight will purify the contents over the course of a day. Fill up several and leave them on a rock....
 

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Just out of curiosity, has anyone considered creating a stash somewhere and placing similar items to what's in your go bag? This way if something happens and you somehow get relieved of your go bag. You have other stuff to fall back on.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
has anyone considered creating a stash.
This is debatable, I personally don't see a need other than common locations (place of employment, home, vehicle). Catches are debated even in the prepping community.

....When you start talking about bugging out to the hills or Terlingua your discussing an event that is at the very least a regional, more likely national, catastrophe.

We have never experienced a national catastrophe in US history, some of these would be on a worldly level...Something on the scale of Nuclear Attack / Large Scale Nuclear Winter, Yellowstone popping it's top....

What scale of collapse are you preparing for? 3 Days? 3 Weeks? 3 Months? Years? Each has a level of society that has likely survived, if we look at Katrina, society was very much intact immediately outside the wake of the hurricane. People who self-evacuated before landfall saw no real interruption to there needs besides being displaced....Those who were stuck in New Orleans Rescue operations took a few weeks....Recovery is still on going...
 

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This is debatable, I personally don't see a need other than common locations (place of employment, home, vehicle). Catches are debated even in the prepping community.

....When you start talking about bugging out to the hills or Terlingua your discussing an event that is at the very least a regional, more likely national, catastrophe.

We have never experienced a national catastrophe in US history, some of these would be on a worldly level...Something on the scale of Nuclear Attack / Large Scale Nuclear Winter, Yellowstone popping it's top....

What scale of collapse are you preparing for? 3 Days? 3 Weeks? 3 Months? Years? Each has a level of society that has likely survived, if we look at Katrina, society was very much intact immediately outside the wake of the hurricane. People who self-evacuated before landfall saw no real interruption to there needs besides being displaced....Those who were stuck in New Orleans Rescue operations took a few weeks....Recovery is still on going...
Katrina was a mess.. a guy stabbed another person over a bag of ice. Looters going door to door going through houses. Folks robbing others at gun point to get whatever they could. I know that stuff happens all the time. But not normally on such a grand scale. Armed guards had to be placed around portable cell towers to prevent the fuel cans from walking off.

After the storm passed.. Driving back through Meridian MS was like a ghost town. there was nothing moving at all. Just lucky we filled up in Alabama before hitting the MS line. Meridian is normally busy day or night, at least speaking of traffic. Not that night...


You are right.. stash or not to stash. It's very subjective. I personally would rather have stuff set aside that I can use when I need it, and not be carrying everything in my backpack to be taken.

The behavior you see in people even during incidents like katrina is anything but rational. It's just another thing you prepare for.

Anyway,
I was just curious if anyone else had stashed stuff away for later use.
 

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Discussion Starter #26 (Edited)
Katrina was a mess...The behavior you see in people even during incidents like katrina is anything but rational. It's just another thing you prepare for.

The largest population seeking government services post-disaster needed governmental services pre-disaster. People often over estimate the use of shelters, they are high on the list of pre-disaster preperation demands but 1-5% of evacuees actually use it. Peoples behaivor directly reflects what they had pre-disaster in the form of food and supplies even if not in a disaster kit. When you are living from pay check to pay check or worse, EBT cards, it's very likely you have limited supplies and food at home. Those who can and choose to heed the warnings they shelter with Family and Friends being number one...people leave before landfall (1st VAST MAJORITY), motels/hotels, (2nd) and shelters coming in at dead last (3rd)....

New Orleans? People already distrusted the government, preferring to stay behind. They were low income residents who feared they would not be able to return or had no resources to do so. To give some perspective, the Superdome was equipped to hand about 5-10,000, about 25,000 showed up.

When FEMA arrived?
Besides physical aid, FEMA handed out aid funds following the disaster through the form of pre-paid debit cards. The accountability was low on how received them and what household got them. Multiple people collected more than once, people often took the money and used it for anything but food or shelter which is the intended purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
@MSTonka, would a storage locker work for you?
LOL....I think he is thinking a little bit more...buried....





O2 Absorb......Good Oil for guns, knives metal...ect....


6" PVC with good caps and plumbers sealant likely would work...I would bag everything and duck tape as well.

10-20 bucks you have a decent "vault"....
 

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Even a good ammo can would work. Those can be partially buried/covered etc for years and last the elements. Those are used in Geo-caching quite frequently.

Although the burial tube idea is pretty awesome!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Even a good ammo can would work. Those can be partially buried/covered etc for years and last the elements. Those are used in Geo-caching quite frequently!
I wasn't sure on the size of item you were looking to cache....Figured it was a firearm, in which case figured a Mosin or 10/22, they are cheap and relatively useful in survival.

Do you know what you are looking to cache? Sholder mounted missile tubes, tank rounds ect, can be found surplus....Basically the same idea as ammo cans, I think the PVC idea would be cheaper and serve the same purpose but could be wrong.
 

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I wasn't sure on the size of item you were looking to cache....Figured it was a firearm, in which case figured a Mosin or 10/22, they are cheap and relatively useful in survival.

Do you know what you are looking to cache? Sholder mounted missile tubes, tank rounds ect, can be found surplus....Basically the same idea as ammo cans, I think the PVC idea would be cheaper and serve the same purpose but could be wrong.
Actually, I never thought about caching a firearm. Although it is a good idea. I would just be really concerned about the wrong person finding it. Not really sure what the legalities would be.
Also, your pvc idea... never thought of that either. Have used ammo cans in the past. The pvc would probably last much longer.

Also, I wouldn't want to cache more than I could easily carry out. Or more than I would be willing to lose... If the site were to be discovered.

Whatever it is I would want to be able to easily carry it out. Once you dig it up. that spot would most likely not be reusable.

And you don't really want to turn yourself into a pack mule toting out something like an over sized pelican case.
That is assuming you didn't have available fuel for your vehicle. And had to hot foot it out. The more you were carrying, the more energy you could be potentially wasting. And here in the south.. in the summertime when it's 110 in the shade. You wouldn't make it very far.
 

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Discussion Starter #33 (Edited)
What's funny? You're always talking 3 months to a year in preps and he didn't mention what it is he wanted to stash.
Because I thought you were joking...It wouldn't be the first time you left a sarcastic comment beyond literal meaning.

The reason I was thinking the PVC pipe idea works well because you could size it to your post hole digger and drop it in place fairly quickly....I would want at least 3 feet of dirt on top of it for an idea such as this. Cover with old brush before leaving the site so when the soil settles it does not leave a "disturbed" sign right on top of it plus you may be able to mark it for your eyes later...Dragging a large rock if they are natural in the area, ect on top of the site.

What does time frame have to do with anything in this case? Do you even think you would even be able to maintain your home after a year without rule of law? Your talking a scenario not yet seen in the modern world. The closest we have even seen in relatively stable country 1980's Somalia ....collapsing into it's current state of Civil War. Imagine yourself in Mogadishu in 1993 and 1994.....You would have gone from police and public services to essentially a barter economy....
 

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Great post and great idea! I'd like to add some items or alternatives for a starter kit. A little back story. I'm an old Army Scout and spent a lot of years in the woods. We learned to pack light, pack efficiently and pack for worst case scenarios.
Here are some ideas to consider:
Backpacks:
A. I prefer a pack that has a frame. (internal or external) comfort is key. A pack rubbing in the wrong places can really wear one down. Frames have a way of dispersing the load evenly. Loads settle in frameless packs adding stress to your lower back and shoulders.
B. Something with a detachable daypack. If you have to set up camp somewhere, it's nice to have a daypack the can be detached and used for short treks, exploring, foraging or whatever.
Necessities: IMHO
1. Sandwich bags and some freezer (roll your extra socks, shirts, undergarments etc.) and store in these. Try to keep all packed items dry at all costs.
2. Garage bag (large enough to cover your pack if needed)
3. Waterproof matches, lighter etc. I also buy the small starter logs (size of sharpie markers). The less energy you need to exert to start a fire the better. You burn a lot of calories in the field.
4. K-bar or Machete. Also a Gerber multi-tool, Leatherman and a 3-5" knife with locking blade. I prefer Gerber. You can pick these up at your local Army/Navy store for $15-25 and they are bulletproof or as we said Joeproof. Someone had mentioned a small wire saw. I have firsthand experience with these and you will expend A LOT of energy using these. Blisters, muscle failure, the whole nine yards trying to cut something.
5. A good Atlas, or some quad maps of the ares you plan to be in and a good compass. Electronics fail, batteries die. A map and compass can be a life saver. We used to use our GPS's periodically to get a fixed position when needed and use the maps for the majority of our navigation. You'll learn the terrain better and recognize terrain features easier this way.
6. Field stripped MRE's (remove all unnecessary items and duck tape close) Ramen and other easily prepared meals
7. Small field burner that can be used with a small propane tank ($10) a field mess kit.(fork/spoon/knife combo.) canteen cup/ mess plate.
8. Poncho and poncho liner. 2 ponchos preferably. One can be used for shelter and the other can be used to wrap up in and when used in conjunction with liner, can be very warm.
9. 550 parachord and duct tape can fix just about anything! A couple locking D-rings are useful for a field expedient pulley. You can also hang items with them (keep the rodents out of your pack and your food) a raccoon can reek havoc on your food supplies.
10. As much water as you can comfortably carry. 2 qt. canteens (soft shell) can be attached to the outside of pack for extra. Some water purification tabs (emergency) and a bottle that has a filter if needed.
11. First aid items:
A. Aspirin, tylenol, ibuprofen (just ideas) this stuff comes in handy when your sore.
B.. Gauze, bandages and a pliable quick splint.
C. Anti-bacterial lotion of sorts. Untreated cuts can become infected quickly in a field environment.
D. Foot powder, tooth brush, toothpaste and toiletries (soap). A small wash rag and towel. You can't imagine how brushing your teeth, washing up, dry feet and a fresh pair of socks can make you feel. It's a huge psychological boost!!
E. Bug spray!!
12. Portable radio, 2-way with weather. Extra batteries. Mag light or Led light. Chemlights are a good option too. (Light sticks) help conserve batteries.

I like the military surplus stuff myself. The box store stuff is cheap but it is Cheaply made and fails when put to the test. Clips break, straps come unstitched. The ponchos tear and become brittle in colder temps.
Take your time a buy quality items that will last and not fail when you need them the most. It is stressful enough in these situations and not having to worry about your equipment failing is huge. Good luck and I hope I've added some insight.
What are some recommendations for this radio. What brand, size, weight, duration? I think this is a great idea. My inexperience and ignorance would have had me overlook this until I really needed it. So, what is a good freq for a survival, emergency use. I'd bet a dollar to a donut that there is a universal watch channel.

In a pinch you can use a UV Chemlight, 90 or so seconds and it's good....

Other cheap methods? Bring some purification tablets with you
...Tastes like crap.

Plastic water bottle's can be found nearly everywhere including in the woods, beaches, ect.....
Can someone teach me about water purification with a chem lite stick? Can we use an expended lite stick or does it have to be fresh?

Thank you guys for getting me to think along these lines. There is a PSA on TV about making plans with your family and the catch line is "Winging it is never a good plan"

I guess between that commercial and this thread, I have opened my eyes.
 

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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
Can someone teach me about water purification with a chem lite stick? Can we use an expended lite stick or does it have to be fresh?
UV Light kills a ton of stuff in the water but don't consider it a filter. It's not going to take oil, metals, or any of the other bad stuff. UV lighting is always emergency level purification methodology, or if it's coming from a relatively clean source. Sometimes you have to take your chances...Most people are almost too cautious when it comes to water not coming from a facet...

UV Chemlight is absolutely bottom rung....I have not tried it, it's been demonstrated on a few of the mainstream survival shows but I would get a purpose built item....After posting, I looked it up again I could not find any adhoc information on using a chem light for purification or timetable. I know some emit a UV light, I'm just not sure on the exact time table. UV purifiers produce a bit more brightness and power, likely resulting in a quicker purification time. They are expensive to go this route...I personally would go with boil, treat, ect method over a UV light not built for the job....

CamelBak All Clear Microbiological UV Water Purifier (Outdoor Retailer Summer Market 2009) @ Backpacking Light

If you think your water source has large particles in it that may be harmful, try a makeshift filter....Gravel, sand and carbon (ASH)....The same idea can be considerable up-sized in a 50 gallon barrel.
 

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PVC pipe and a Post hole digger, great idea! :cheers: not sarcasm

We just moved off the island to nearly off the grid. Storage locker popped up because I just rented one and they're cheap! I've read of folks stashing some basic preps, all the way up to a bug out trailer and/or vehicle in one.

Sorry for the confusion, Keep up the good work!
 

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UV Light kills a ton of stuff in the water but don't consider it a filter. It's not going to take oil, metals, or any of the other bad stuff. UV lighting is always emergency level purification methodology, or if it's coming from a relatively clean source. Sometimes you have to take your chances...Most people are almost too cautious when it comes to water not coming from a facet...

UV Chemlight is absolutely bottom rung....I have not tried it, it's been demonstrated on a few of the mainstream survival shows but I would get a purpose built item....After posting, I looked it up again I could not find any adhoc information on using a chem light for purification or timetable. I know some emit a UV light, I'm just not sure on the exact time table. UV purifiers produce a bit more brightness and power, likely resulting in a quicker purification time. They are expensive to go this route...I personally would go with boil, treat, ect method over a UV light not built for the job....

CamelBak All Clear Microbiological UV Water Purifier (Outdoor Retailer Summer Market 2009) @ Backpacking Light

If you think your water source has large particles in it that may be harmful, try a makeshift filter....Gravel, sand and carbon (ASH)....The same idea can be considerable up-sized in a 50 gallon barrel.
Thanks,
I was not thinking of a chemlite stick as being a source on UV lighting for microbial characteristics. I am not aware of a super UV lite stick either. Not that I would not be surprised to learn that there is such a thing.

I guess I was expecting that you would reply with more like the light stick as some source of chemical that may be used to purify water similar to the tablets. You know, like utilizing the ammonium nitrate from an instant ice pack for something.:angel
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I am not aware of a super UV lite stick either.l
Not sure if you are talking about a ultra bright chemlight but chemlight does make a ultra bright chem light, it has a burn time of about 30 minutes...It's used for special applications in the military....I would venture to guess runway or landing zone lights or illumination for special operations or any sort of quick light system....

You can find them on their webpage or Botach...Or any of the others...I don't think I have ever seen them in person. When I was in ...we had the 8 hour ones and they worked just fine.
 

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In this part of the country.. 3 foot deep hole will put you in water. So anything you bury would need to be a little closer to the surface.
But, I still think the pvc tube idea is a good idea, and very doable. This could be easily done for med supplies or something like that.
Probably wouldn't hurt to throw add an area map, compass and knife of some sort in there also.
These are always handy to have. GPS's are nice. But if you can't feed it. It becomes a boat anchor.

If you were to add a saw blade in to the tube. You could use that to cut off the cap of the tube. This and some plastic can help you create drinkable water. But, I would still want purification tabs.. Just to be on the safe side.
 
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