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Wow....dredged up an oldie here.

I now have over 157,000mi on my FJ. The 2in aluminum spacer lift is still in the front. I did give the truck new shocks and springs up front and took a daystar poly spacer (1.5in) and cut it down to an inch and put that in back. Also graduated to 285/70/17's on stock alloys that I Dipped black.

How it sits today

 

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I have always measured from fender flare to the ground going across the hub for my numbers. Don't for get that you will have lower numbers on the driver's side due to the "FJ Lean". This lean normally accounts for 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch and also depends on how full your gas tank is.

(The lean is a product of weight in your truck partly attributed to the gas tank, battery, pedals and steering mechanisms all being on the driver's side)
 

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I'll be the newbie voice of the moron here; Sssssssoooooo I need to raise the front of my stock FJ about 2". I've seen simple coil over spacers for $50 and front leveling kits up to $450. A couple of questions: if I go with the cheaper $50 spacers, what else will I need to add? Shocks, etc? What is the advantage to the more expensive kits? Keep in mind that I'm on a budget and I'm not interested in lifting the ol' gal, just raising the front up to where it should be. Lastly, what are the pros vs cons in leveling the front of the FJ in your guys' experiences?
 

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Just wondering if this leveling kit would change my over height to get the car in the garage? I know it only raises the front, but it would seem to me that it would affect overall height a bit tooo. Thanks
 

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I don't think some questions were answered here. Levelling kits are not exactly the best way to raise an FJ. There are basically 2 types.
One that installs over the strut assembly. It basically lower the entire spring shock assembly to give the lift. Since the shock limits the droop of the suspension, it will now allow the suspension to droop 2 inches lower. So now it may surpass the range of motion of the CV joints. Specially if it drooped and fully turned. It could lead to damage. Furthermore. On full compression, the shock will bottom out before the a-arm reaches the bump stops. Now the shock takes the hit and not the frame's rubber bump stop. This is another recipe for shock failure.
The one that installs over the spring compresses the spring more which raises the truck. These are better than the first one because the suspension still operates within the stock parameters for travel. Your CV joints will remain relatively safe and won't over-flex. The shock won't bottom out before the bump stops though they will be subjected to more stress on droop as the spring will be pushing harder when the shock extends to full length. As long as your shocks have a good internal bump stop for extension you should still be good. But one problem that could occur on this one is coil binding on compression. You've compressed the spring a certain amount more than stock and now the coils may contact each other on compression before the a-arm reaches the bump stop on the frame. One hard hit and you could bend the lower stem of the shock. Not ideal either.
The best level for your money would be to lift it when you need new shocks in front. The you can get the Bilstien 5100's. They have three optional levels of lift over stock adjusted using a snap ring under the spring perch. These have shock that are specially valved for a lifted vehicle. It's length of travel was chosen to remain within the stock limits of suspension travel and they will be valved to restore good handling even if the vehicle is lifted. You will have to disassemble the shocks/springs to transfer them to the new shock but then you'd have to do it anyway if you got new shock. But they should give you a good ride, won't damage other drive components or suspension parts. Yes there are reports of these bending stems but this could be due to the use of other springs or additional spacers which shouldn't be used with these shocks.
Spacers are fine for plain cosmetics and fitting bigger tires but not the best for anything else specially off-road with some abuse.
 

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I absolutely concur with what csitracadie just stated. Spacers are fine for looks, but buying the proper shocks (like the 5100's) are the way to go to do a proper level. Also remember to keep weight factored in (such as a heavy metal bumper replacement) and the amount of sag the stock springs would have in the front due to that. In that case, stiffer springs and properly matched shocks are the way to go to account for the extra weight.
 

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I posted before in this thread, I had a 2 inch spacer. ( Had ) it does nothing off-road . Its fine just for looks or getting the front end level . I'm now running fox 2.0 coilovers in front and Fox shocks in the rear. After market coilovers are night and day compared to stock coilovers with a spacer. Like many have said in the past save your money and do it right the first time.
 

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brand new to the forum...about to be a proud new owner...want to level and from the looks of all the different feedback I think it looks easiest, and safest to go bilstein 5100's...also from the looks of it, I dont need anything but the shocks...so cost is shocks and then labor if I decide not to do it...looks like 1.5" but also looks like bilstein is 1" or 2"(if i've seen right)...so what is the recommended shock setting?...also...how much work is there to put these on yourself?

thanks in advance guys
 

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Hi Y'all, I have a 2007 I bought 10 years ago and it came to me with a big ARB front bumper. It's had brewer's droop since I got it and now there's about 2-3" from th etop of the front tires to the flares. In the back it's closer to 6 or 7"
I just bought all 4 shocks and I'm wondering if I should have a 2" lift kit on hand ??. I'd hate to put it all back together and still have this droop. I realize the front assemblies might have fatigued over time and that what has me second guessing whether I should buy those spacers..
I did buy new shocks, front hub bearings 2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser 4 Wheel Drive Front Wheel Bearing & Hub Assembly Pair

Brakes

and CV axles.

I figured it's all in the same area and It's all inter connected.

So, get the spacers or not ?? I'm just running stock tires.
 
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