Toyota FJ Cruiser Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
565 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Sorry no pics. girlfriend has the camera at school with her today. If you saw this thread http://www.fjcruiserforums.com/forums/stereo-electronics/37483-sound-deadener-install.html

then you know I have done some serious sound killing in my truck. What I left off doing at the time was finishing the job, because I thought I was done. today I pulled the rear seat backs out, and took off the upper and lower trim panels on both rear quarters and broke out two rolls of R-13 insulation and started stuffing every nook and cranny I could find in side those hollow tin cans toyota calls quarter panels. The sound deadener job made leaps and bounds in quiet ride quality, but it didn't kill that muffler drone in a way that pleased me, even with the extensive work I did on the rear door. This that I did today, made it go away completely. Literally do as I said, just stuff the insulation into the body after plastic panels have been removed. It does so much for tire noise, road noise, exhaust drone, and there might be a little bit of thermal gain there too.

I did use caution around the invertor, the front and back ( skinny sides ) have fans and vents for air flow, so don't block those. I also put carpet padding ( yeah I know, not exactly the best thing ) in front of the tail light wiring so I wouldn't have to dig out fiberglass insulation when it came time to change a bulb. I will replace it with some second skin overkill when I order some more. other than that, you can do the rear door with just insulation, as I think it should be part of the job, and you could even do the suicide doors as well.

Even if you are never planning to do a sound deadening ( second skin-dynamat, etc. ) install, this will still reap great benefits, give you a noticeably quieter ride all for 20 bucks at the home depot. the R-13 is $9.97 for a 40 sq. ft. roll. It took me about 2.5 to 3 hrs. to do it, but add a little more time if you do the back door, as I had already done mine a few weeks back.....

oh to get the seat backs out, pop the cover off the back of the seat, find a bolt on each bottom corner. the passenger side has the seat belt bolt that has to come out as well you can leave the brackets on the wheel humps, they wont be in your way.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
162 Posts
Nice idea, I was wondering, did you use Great Stuff spray insulation for the roof? I'm not that worried about exhaust as I'm sure my stereo will overcome any outside noises.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
565 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I used great stuff in the ribs of the roof , and in the bottom corners of the holes in the quarters. Kinda near the suicide doors, in the front of the panel, you will see what I mean when you tear it all down, but in hindsight, I could just stuck insulation in there, either way the effect is definitly worth the effort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,460 Posts
Thanks Trainman, awesome post, rep point to you.

You convinced me to take your advice seriously in regards to the sound deadening trick you just mentioned in the rear quarters, so I went and visited this thread you referred us to: http://www.fjcruiserforums.com/forum...r-install.html. I was trying to see visually the area you mentioned for this, but I did not succeed.

Would you please be kind enough to clarify where you did the stuffing? Perhaps you can point to one of the photos in your other thread?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
565 Posts
Discussion Starter #6


I am so sorry I didn't get pics of this for you guys , so here is my best instructions without them.....

right above the wheel hump, and in towards the exterior wall of the vehicle. Kinda behind the seat belt mechanism. When you pull the panels out it will be very obvious as to where to put the insulation.

A few steps and guidelines for tearing out your interior. you will need to remove all four tie downs in the rear floor, and the rear tie downs also hold down a little ramp like panel, that will have to come out, and it will lift up after the bolts are removed from the tie downs. Also take out the sill plate close to the rear door, with the phillips head screws. take the floor mat out of the back. then go up front, open all four doors, and take out the middle and rear sill plates on both sides, just pull up kinda hard, they pop off and require some effort, they won't break. then fold your seat bottoms forward, and take the seat belt anchor bolts on each side, the cover over the bolts just pops off, so give it a little pull or you can pry it off with a flat blade. After that look up, near the headliner right behind the suicide door on each side, you will see a little round cover, use a small flat blade to open it, it is on a hinge so look for the little slot where you pry up at and use it only, and you will find a 10mm bolt in there that needs to come out. head around to the back of the truck and remove the two tie downs below each back window, with a phillips or a 10 mm. ( FJammer sub woofer requires a few extra steps - see the footnote ) and then on the right -passenger- side only there is a screw under a trim panel on the vertical side on the wheel hump that has to come out, both sides have 3 screws on the floor and one screw under the rear sill plate right by the weather stripping that need to come out.

If you will notice when you are looking at the little rear corner windows you will see a round fastener directly above the window that is light gray - same color as the panel, use something small and push in on the middle of the clip, just a little bit and then you can pull the fastener out without damaging it. you may have to stick a flat blade under the outer edge or a long fingernail, but it will come out, and you wont damage it this way.

Also you will have to pop the invertor plug cover out of the right side panel , use a flat blade to pry the square panel out and unplug it set the plug aside with all your other screws and parts.

Now for the seats, you only really need to take the seat backs out, and you can just fold the bottoms forward and out the way.

work a few fingers under the plastic panels on the back of the seat and pull, the panels are held in by tree clips so just give it a pull , and it snaps off, and re installation is just the opposite, position in place and give it a whack with the bottom of your fist. In the lower corner of each seat ( panel removed ) you will see a bolt ( i think a 12 or 14 mm ) and that is what your after, take those out with the seat back at about a 45 degree angle and you will be able to get the seat back out, there is a little metal rod that wraps around a flat metal plate so look for it right by the bolt and move the seat to free it from its hinge mount ( it sounds odd, but again, it will make perfect sense when you are there doing it ) the passenger side seat back has a seat belt built in it, so there is the "belt" bolted to the floor under the seat bottom, I didn't un bolt it I just needed to move the seat enough to pop the dark gray trim loose and remove it. I don't think you will have any problems doing it this way.

Now to pull the panels out. When you do this you are gonna think you are gonna break these plastic parts in order to get them out, cause it requires some effort , so be careful, go by feel and if you feel too much resistance try grabbing a different spot and pulling from there.

The dark gray panel ( bottom ) has to come out first, and by this point is only held in by tree clips and they do the job well. Work from the back of the vehicle and just kinda pull the panel towards the center of the vehicle, and I noticed that the dark gray panel and the light gray panel are locked in with male/female tabs, so look for that and work the tabs free as you get the panel loose. the tabs dont have any kinda tooth on them so you wont break anything. You may have to pull the weatherstripping loose around the rear doo and the suicide door to get your hand under the panel, but it is just a pull off/ push application. very simple. After you you have the bottom panel off the top panel works the same way, a little force and it comes out. Look for any of your tree clips that stayed in the metal and not on your plastic panels and pull them out of the metal and stick em back on the empty slots on the trim panel (* again this will make sense when you are there looking at it )

Stuff insulatin into the big gaping hollow areas, and put it all back together.


Foot note:

The Fjammer sub has to come out if you have it, and I had one but it is gone now, a quick search should lead you to instructions on taking it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,175 Posts
I used great stuff in the ribs of the roof , and in the bottom corners of the holes in the quarters. Kinda near the suicide doors, in the front of the panel, you will see what I mean when you tear it all down, but in hindsight, I could just stuck insulation in there, either way the effect is definitly worth the effort.
Thanks dude! I've bookmarked your thread in my "future Mods" file.
What do you think about using that insulation for the entire truck?
I'm thinking cost vs effect.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
162 Posts
Your mention of carpet padding gave me a pretty good idea. Overkill pro is like $2.40 a square foot whereas carpet padding is $.50 a square foot. I think this would work great on the backs of all the plastic panels as it will do the same thing as Overkill will, just much cheaper. If I can find a good adhesive to make it stick to the panels, I'll definitely try it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
565 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
I think using insulation in the entire truck is asking for problems, you have moving parts in the front doors, and it would be hard to flatten the insulation out under the rubber flooring, and I kinda think you would diminish its " insulating" qualities, not to mention you would have fiberglass dust all over your car for months. statistically - that can't be very healthy. That is another thing, clean your interior very well after doing this mod, fiberglass can do serious damage to eyes skin and lungs.

I think sound deadener around your compressor will be fine, I think the second skin site says that it has a heat resistance of around 500 degrees. Remember though, butyl mat ( damplifier , dynamat ) is a product designed mostly for vibration, and to prevent metal from resonating surrounding noises and vibrations. This is what made it so popular with car stereo enthusiasts. ( read BASS rattle elimination ) I would suggest a layer or two of damplifier pro, and then a single layer of overkill pro on top of that. This is what I did to my roof, and I don't even hear the rain on my roof anymore. And I do mean a VERY hard rain. The closed cell foam products like second skin are impressive to just have in your hand, and the fact that the material is just heavy in your hand further proves what it does, it is a acoustical sound blocker. Very similar to what you would find in a recording studio, just flat, where as a sound studio you would find a egg crate type surface - but basically the same thing.

Carpet padding on the back of the panels would offer some sort of benefit but I am holding out for my next order from second skin. The overkill pro is really thick, so I think I am gonna hold out for the overkill to do the back of the door panels and trim panels, and put overkill pro on the inside of the front doors against the outer door skin. I am gonna have to wait till after christmas though, cause I gotta buy everybody else something, as I have bought myself an abundance of goodies this year already.

As far as a adhesive goes, try 3M super #77 - spray adhesive , if this wont hold it nothing will. Just follow the directions. spray both surfaces and let it sit about a minute to tack up, then stick parts together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,079 Posts
Yesterday, I picked some up and decided to do the roof and back interior panels minus the floor board. The noise of the ARB roof rack and drone of the exhaust has not gone away but the noise level went down to a tolerable level. The decision is still out for the insulation benefit inside the truck. I should find out in January when I do the "Camino del Diablo" expedition. I did not do the floor board because there just isn't any space and doing so would look like a pillow underneath it.

It was an easy job with the exception of the headliner. Taking it off was easy and intuitive but gravity is not your friend when you are adjusting the insulation to fit between the roof ribs.

I would recommend Dynamatting ( or some other thin application) the Headliner and Floorboards. The floorboard is where the rest of the drone is coming into the interior.


I didn't take the seat belt off but just moved the panel and seats to the side.

here is the location where Trainman0978 was talking about in where to stuff the insulation:
ribs.jpg

Here is the Panel and the 14mm bolt to remove the seat back. I just moved it to the side.
panels.JPG

Here is confirmation that even though I do not have rear speakers, The wiring is back there underneath the blank.

rear speaker wire.JPG

Anyone know what this connector is for? The GPS or XM option?

switch.jpg


Tools needed:
14 mm socket
10 mm socket
Phillips screw driver
Flat blade screw driver

I hope this helps

Cheers,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
565 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
did you fill up the whole quarter panel, and the rear door?

and yes i think that dynamatting and insulation is the only way to get the "full" effect, but the difference is noticeable and worth the money spent-time consumed equation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
my dad works in construction and warned me of the tendency of fiberglass insulation to hold moisture and thus have the possibility of resulting in mold... i'm still going to try this mod, but consider yourselves warned of the possibility... might keep an eye out for this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
565 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
my dad works in construction and warned me of the tendency of fiberglass insulation to hold moisture and thus have the possibility of resulting in mold... i'm still going to try this mod, but consider yourselves warned of the possibility... might keep an eye out for this.
Right. which is why It is not anywhere that is near any electrical, and it is not packed in too tight that it will be able to dry out in the heat of the day. Also, as a precaution, because of the moisture, It won't be any real work to take it out and put new stuff in its place a few years down the road. Any insulation or batting will have a tendacy to grow mold if it gets wet. The rear quarters should actually get any water in them, and any condensation built up will have to very small amounts and come from moisture most likely from inside the truck.

Even with knowing about this, you still can't go wrong doing it.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top