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Hey folks. A newbie question here. So I have a 2007 fj w 124k miles on her. Had front axles replaced weeks ago due to a torn up boot leaking grease. Ya Know our Owners Manual says Once a Month to run vehicle in 4wd mode. Figured good time to do so so stopped put her in 4H and vehicle ran absolutely great. Stopped at Bojangles for some chicken and while still in 4wd goin thru drive thru when turning hard L or R I'd really have to hit gas to move up. Like vehicle felt like it was in a bind. Hit open road again and no problems. Question is does steering and turning radius really get hard like normally if not in the dirt or mud?? Thanks Ahead for answers
 

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You need to have some slip in the road surface when you use 4hi and especially with 4lo. Otherwise you get driveline binding like you described. 4hi on a wet paved road is ok. But gravel, sand or snow is better. The binding is because the front and rear wheels turn at different speeds when turning a corner. There is no center differential to compensate for the difference, which is how AWD or full time 4WD systems work.
 

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The manual says 4WD once a month, but also says it has to be on a low traction surface like as described above by @NVDojo . Grass is fine too.
Anything without a center diff (so most part time 4WD vehicles including AT FJ, Jeep Wrangler, Ford F150 etc) shouldn't be driven on high traction surfaces while in 4WD, and certainly not tight turns in 4WD on high traction surfaces like through a drive-in.
There are several full-time 4WD vehicles from Toyota, including LC200, LC 120-150 Prado/Lexus GX, MT FJ Cruiser, and of course the 4Runner. The part time system is to improve fuel economy, and would seem simpler, but is ultimately more complicated because of the ADD system (which replaces the old style manual locking front hubs) which is the main reason that you have to exercise 4WD regularly - it can seize if not used regularly.
Full time 4WDs don't have ADD or manual locking hubs, so are simpler and more reliable, but at a penalty of MPG.
 

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As said...

Do not drive on sealed road in 4WD except in a straight line or you risk wind up causing major damage to the transmission. But if, like me you don't get off road often enough then engage it on the road when you can for short stints on a straight road... you can shift in and out without need to stop or slow (though not on the interstate!) so if you see a long straight slip it in and then out agin before the bends.
 

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As said...

Do not drive on sealed road in 4WD except in a straight line or you risk wind up causing major damage to the transmission. But if, like me you don't get off road often enough then engage it on the road when you can for short stints on a straight road... you can shift in and out without need to stop or slow (though not on the interstate!) so if you see a long straight slip it in and then out agin before the bends.
That last sentence just sounds so wrong...
 

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All of these folks are right, but the best way to fix the issue is to live where there are no paved roads and 4wd is a daily occurence. Preferably with zero social contact at all for a stress free life. ;)
 
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