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Good day, everyone.
Ever since I bought my FJ last 2020 brand new, I only had a little amount of time to use the 4 wheel drive. Owner’s manual said to drive with the 4x4 engaged a least a total of about several miles(?) in a year.
Would there be any issues if I skipped engaging the 4x4 regularly?
Thanks.
 

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I know the owner's manual calls for running several miles ( iIrc the # is 10?) every month in 4wd. I think general wisdom says every 2 or 3 months isn't anything to worry about, but if you look back and the last time it was in 4wd is 8 months or a year ago maybe it's time to get it into 4wd a little more often.
 
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fka BLACK HAWK
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go play in the sand/dirt/mud/snow once every 3 months
 

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correct!

"off road" can be as simple as some dirt on the shoulder, or a dirt parking lot.
 

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'07 Sun Fusion 6MT FJC Work in Progress
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Ever since I bought my FJ last 2020 brand new
You suck.

- An American

;)

Curious, since my used '07 bought a month and a half ago (lol) didn't have the owner's manual in it - does one need to engage 4Lo when this is done? Is it enough to just engage 4Hi and drive it a bit, or is essential to cycle through everything? It is probably good to make sure 4Lo engages every once in awhile just as a systems check, but if the point is to keep the lubrication of the gearing in the transfer case happening, does usage of 4Hi fulfill this requirement?
 

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Curious, since my used '07 bought a month and a half ago (lol) didn't have the owner's manual in it - does one need to engage 4Lo when this is done? Is it enough to just engage 4Hi and drive it a bit, or is essential to cycle through everything? It is probably good to make sure 4Lo engages every once in awhile just as a systems check, but if the point is to keep the lubrication of the gearing in the transfer case happening, does usage of 4Hi fulfill this requirement?
The recommendation for monthly 4WD usage is to ensure proper lubrication of components in the front differential, not the transfer case.

You can download a free Owner's Manual (and just as important, a Scheduled Maintenance Guide) for every model year FJ Cruiser from the Toyota.com website.

Click the Owner's tab, then select the vehicle and model year, then Manuals and Warranties. The Owner's Manuals contain lots of useful information on proper use of the 4WD system, the Rear Diff Lock, ATRAC, the RSCA Off switch, etc.
 

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'07 Sun Fusion 6MT FJC Work in Progress
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Thinking about what I wrote earlier, I suppose I considered it the transfer case since I have a 6MT. Front diff is always turning in the 6MT. For the part-time 4WD AT FJCs I can definitely see how it would be for the front differential. Either way, I guess shouldn't make a difference in the 6MT, since all them gears and whatnot are a-turnin' all the time, gittin' 'er lubed up quite nice on the regular.

Edit: I realize the 6MT is really 4H, 4HL and 4LL on the stick. Personally I go with AWD, 4Hi, and 4Lo as my nomenclature.
 

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Abot -
Two points -
1. You never mentioned your FJ is a manual transmission model, so all the responses were geared towards the much more common auto trans model, where the Owner's Manual does recommend the monthly use of 4WD range.

2. There IS a semantic and functional difference between AWD, 4Hi, and 4Lo versus 4H, 4HL (4 Hi Locked) and 4LL (4 Lo Locked). You do not want to drive a MT FJ on high-traction surfaces (pavement) in either of the Locked ranges, or you can suffer the same type of driveline binding that occurs if you try to drive the AT models in any 4WD range on pavement.
 

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'07 Sun Fusion 6MT FJC Work in Progress
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FJtest

1. I wasn't being argumentative, merely pointing out that my comment and line of thinking was due to my personal vehicle being a 6MT and that the front diff is always turning in the 6MT. Toyota's recommendation of monthly usage of the 4WD in a 6MT is likely due to it being a systems check to make sure the center diff is locking correctly rather than a lubrication issue.

2. FYI I know the difference, considering I am a ME that studied advanced vehicle dynamics in undergrad and grad school. Not that it really means anything other than I am not a Greenie. Functionally, the 6MT is AWD when the center Torsen differential is not locked, with the helical gearing in the center differential transferring torque between the front and rear axles based on the amount of grip/slip present at each end. Many such systems in the auto world that are called AWD do it the same exact way. Just because Toyota 'chose' to call it 4H, 4HL, and 4LL doesn't negate that fact. You can put a cat in an oven, but it doesn't make it a biscuit.

Semantics aside, please explain the functional difference between the 6MT 4H mode versus AWD, the functional difference between the 6MT 4HL and the 5AT 4H, and the functional difference between the 6MT 4LL and the 5AT 4L.

Toyota should have used AWD, 4H, and 4L for the 6MT as it would unify the nomenclature and prevent people arguing semantics in forums for a decade and a half. The only reason I can think that they didn't is because there seems to be a negative stigma in the Off-Road world that an AWD vehicle isn't meant for playing in the sticks and rocks. The marketing department obviously made that decision.
 

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Also not being argumentative, but check your Owner's Manual, Toyota does not have any recommendation "for monthly 4WD usage in the 6MT models", it's only stated as a recommendation for AT models.

In the motor vehicle world, AWD is generally associated with light-duty FWD drivetrains that have what's functionally a PTO modification that can send, on command, some power to the rear wheels, usually through some kind of a viscous coupling, electromagnetically-actuated clutch, etc. Some European performance vehicles do have very sophisticated AWD/4WD systems where the distinction becomes blurred.

You stated that the MT FJ driveline is only 'AWD' when the center diff is locked ... isn't it also 'AWD' when the center diff is NOT locked?

In comparison, a true 4WD system will generally have front and rear drivetrains that are designed to have the same torque capacity and service life, and are almost always considerably more robust than FWD based AWD systems.

In the most simplistic definition of having some ability to send some power to each wheel, AWD and 4WD mean the same thing.

6MT LL and 5AT 4L ranges are functionally equivalent, except Toyota's selection of nomenclature correctly tries to indicate that "LL" in the MT vehicles means 'Low Gear Range & Center Diff Locked', whereas "4L" in the AT models just means 'Low Gear Range'.

Of course, you can assign any name you want to anything.
 

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2012 Army Green 6MT, TRD
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I was going to ask the 6MT question. but I see that has already been discussed. with the 6MT you don't have to worry about periodically engaging 4wd... you only have to worry about the dreaded TOB chirp!!! I love my FJ, but I would also like to strangle the idiot engineer that designed that crap.
 

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Not a bad idea to use all mechanical options in all cars every few months, it keeps linkages, motors, gears, etc lubricated and moving freely..
 

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The functionality of full-time 4WD with any type of limited slip is exactly the same as a number of AWD cars, though as @FJtest said, there are also sophisticated ways to control power to the second axle on modern AWDs. Most of these are computer controlled and happen automatically, while there are a few which allow the driver to select where the power is directed.

The key difference between "full-time 4WD" and AWD systems is the ability to select Low Range.
 

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Not to be a nip picker, there are full time 4-wheel drive with no reduction ratio transfer cases., AWD, and 4-wheel drive with reduction transfer case.
 

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'07 Sun Fusion 6MT FJC Work in Progress
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The functionality of full-time 4WD with any type of limited slip is exactly the same as a number of AWD cars, though as @FJtest said, there are also sophisticated ways to control power to the second axle on modern AWDs. Most of these are computer controlled and happen automatically, while there are a few which allow the driver to select where the power is directed.
I'll take a mechanically determined Torsen diff any day over electronically controlled systems that will likely fail at some point and be impossible to fix because the 'control module' has been discontinued by the manufacturer. It's one of the many reasons I like the minimalist aspect of the FJ. Yeah it has some electronically controlled systems, like VSC, but it is a far cry from many other vehicles on the market. This is the first vehicle I have ever driven that had electronic nannies, except for ABS, and magically I have survived Colorado winters for 24 driving years. And personally, I hate ABS. Whether you consider these new systems 'sophisticated' or just a pain in the rear is in the eye of the beholder.

The key difference between "full-time 4WD" and AWD systems is the ability to select Low Range.
Possibly, but the fact of the matter is there is no formal definition of either. The manufacturer chooses to call their system anything they would like. The marketing departments try to make their system sound unique and so much better than the competition, when the vast majority accomplish the same exact task through a variety of different pathways. I tend to err on the side of the KISS concept. The simplest way of getting to the same results means less ancillary systems that can break and leave you stranded or send your vehicle to the sheet metal graveyard.
 
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