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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All !
Few weeks ago I purchased the 2016 Fj (no df lock model)

last week I decided to switch to h4 to make this recommended use of 4x4 for 15min, I did this on normal road condition dried road surface, after I did this it was almost impossible to drive the car, the tires was squiggling and I have a problems in every turn.

also I have a problem to switch back to 2wheel drive I manage to do that after I switch to reverse gear and reverse the car than it switch back to 2wheel drive

I talked to the mechanic and he told me to check the car off road on the sad which
will create the resistance, so I went to the beach and with my surprise the car was flying...

Is this normal ?
Please advice me
Thank you
Simon
 

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Hi All !
Few weeks ago I purchased the 2016 Fj (no df lock model)

last week I decided to switch to h4 to make this recommended use of 4x4 for 15min, I did this on normal road condition dried road surface, after I did this it was almost impossible to drive the car, the tires was squiggling and I have a problems in every turn.

also I have a problem to switch back to 2wheel drive I manage to do that after I switch to reverse gear and reverse the car than it switch back to 2wheel drive

I talked to the mechanic and he told me to check the car off road on the sad which
will create the resistance, so I went to the beach and with my surprise the car was flying...

Is this normal ?
Please advice me
Thank you
Simon
It will drive different on pavement in 4wd. Shouldn't be nearly impossible. Maybe your just not used to it. Remember when your in 4wd, your center is locked. So it is more difficult to turn full tilt on pavement. Look up different between awd and 4wd. And why you shouldn't use 4wd on pavement. Having to use reverse to get it out of 4wd is nothing new. Some vehicles that's the only way. Read your visor. Lucky for me all I have to do is back off the gas if I'm driving and that will usually do it for me. Theres tons of info out there.

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If your FJ is an automatic transmission model, it has what is called a "part-time" 4WD system, and you MUST NOT drive it on high-traction surface (e.g. dry pavement) in 4WD.

The auto transmission models do NOT have a center differential, and driving them on high-traction surfaces will (as you clearly discovered) cause severe driveline "binding" and subject all the driveline components (transfer case, U-joints, differentials, etc.) to abnormal stress levels.

Auto trans FJ models can ONLY be driven in 4WD mode on low-traction surfaces (dirt, gravel, snow, ice, etc.) that will allow the tires to "slip" as required to alleviate the stresses that accumulate in a part-time 4WD system due to the different distances that individual tires travel during turns.
 

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It will drive different on pavement in 4wd. Shouldn't be nearly impossible. Maybe your just not used to it. Remember when your in 4wd, your center is locked. So it is more difficult to turn full tilt on pavement. Look up different between awd and 4wd. And why you shouldn't use 4wd on pavement. Having to use reverse to get it out of 4wd is nothing new. Some vehicles that's the only way. Read your visor. Lucky for me all I have to do is back off the gas if I'm driving and that will usually do it for me. Theres tons of info out there.

Sent from my SM-N960U1 using Tapatalk
Only MANUAL TRANSMISSION FJs have center differentials, and they can be manually locked.

The default mode for driving on high-traction surfaces is for the center differential to remain UNLOCKED.

If you attempt to drive an auto trans FJ in 4WD mode on high traction surfaces, the driveline can bind so severely that the vehicle becomes almost undriveable, as the OP discovered.
 

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Only MANUAL TRANSMISSION FJs have center differentials, and they can be manually locked.

The default mode for driving on high-traction surfaces is for the center differential to remain UNLOCKED.

If you attempt to drive an auto trans FJ in 4WD mode on high traction surfaces, the driveline can bind so severely that the vehicle becomes almost undriveable, as the OP discovered.
I will agree about the manual and that it will put a bind on a locked center and default high traction surface being unlocked or 2wd if you are auto, but I will disagree about the auto that its undriveable on pavement when in 4wd.Not that it is recommended to do so. Not getting into a pissing contest here. Just stating what I've experienced in the 4wds I've had manual and not.

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I will agree about the manual and that it will put a bind on a locked center and default high traction surface being unlocked or 2wd if you are auto, but I will disagree about the auto that its undriveable on pavement when in 4wd.Not that it is recommended to do so. Not getting into a pissing contest here. Just stating what I've experienced in the 4wds I've had manual and not.

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We are discussing specifically the Automatic FJ 4WD platforms....not any other vehicle. The only way you should ever drive the automatic FJ in 4H or 4L on dry, asphalt or concrete roads is if you are driving in mainly a straight line and not turning corners (and only for the purpose of keeping the transfer case lubricated). If you drive around a parking lot doing lots of 90 degree turns and such on dry pavement you are going to get severe drivetrain bind (as the OP found out).

The manual FJ has a different drivetrain where it is full time 4WD (AWD) with a torsen center differential that allows slipping to handle the full time AWD/4WD. On the manual FJ, if you switch to the HL (high locked) and the LL (low-locked) positions, you will experience drivetrain bind and it should not be driven on dry asphalt/concrete in any of the locked center differential position.

And, all this information is in the owners manual.
 

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(snip) but I will disagree about the auto that its undriveable on pavement when in 4wd.
As the OP clearly stated: "I did this on normal road condition dried road surface, after I did this it was almost impossible to drive the car."

1. Is it possible to make the vehicle move under its own power with a severely bound-up driveline? Yes.

2. In this condition, is the vehicle providing multiple indicators that something is seriously wrong with what you are doing? Yes.

3. Are all drivers perceptive enough to detect that something is seriously wrong? Probably not.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Dear All

Everything is clear to me now, I do highly appreciate your responds...
 

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Okay, manual or automatic, it’s not recommended. What if any improvement on stress/heat is realized with a breather bung relocation or venting?
 

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Okay, manual or automatic, it’s not recommended. What if any improvement on stress/heat is realized with a breather bung relocation or venting?
How could ANYTHING you might do to a breather have ANY affect on stress levels or heat generated in a transfer case or differential??

All a breather does is allow pressure equalization between the inside of the transfer case (or differential) and the surrounding air pressure in response to temperature or elevation changes.
 
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