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Hey everyone, as the title says in the past two and a half years or so I have replaced at least 3 brake callipers per side on the front. Bought my FJ in May of 2012 with 125,000km on it and didn't have a single issue for the first few years. In the past two and a half years I have tried different brands of callipers cheap and expensive but nothing seems to last. After some research on here I replaced the flex hoses hoping that was the issue. Today I just replaced my front left calliper after putting a new one on in October of 2016. If anyone else has had a problem with their FJ similar to mine please let me know what you have done to try it fix it and if it work or not, i'm getting pretty tired of replacing them!!
 

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Hey everyone, as the title says in the past two and a half years or so I have replaced at least 3 brake callipers per side on the front. Bought my FJ in May of 2012 with 125,000km on it and didn't have a single issue for the first few years. In the past two and a half years I have tried different brands of callipers cheap and expensive but nothing seems to last. After some research on here I replaced the flex hoses hoping that was the issue. Today I just replaced my front left calliper after putting a new one on in October of 2016. If anyone else has had a problem with their FJ similar to mine please let me know what you have done to try it fix it and if it work or not, i'm getting pretty tired of replacing them!!
Wow, that seems off. Do you have any more info on location, usage, caliper brand, etc. that might be relevant to the conditions that the calipers are experiencing?

Also, welcome to the forum!
 

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I just changed my fronts. They were awful grabby. I had a hard pull to the left since I bought it about one and a half years ago. I replaced them with '12 4runner calipers and rotors. They are supposed to be redesigned and less prone to seizing. They are a lot bigger too. Working great so far.
 

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I live in southern Ontario, Canada. It is my daily driver and put on approx 25,000km a year of pretty much perfect driving (cruising at 90km/hr on country roads) with very minimal city driving and and offloading. As for brands I can't think of the names off the top of my head. At least one set I got from a Toyota dealer, a couple from local parts stores (possibly AC Delco). The one I put on today was a NAPA Eclipse. Only mods are 2.5inch daystar lift, MB TKO rims and 285/70/17 Falkens off of discount tire direct. FJ just rolled over 240,000km
 

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I have heard of that the last time i was looking into the problem, would love to but just started a new career that is only part time right now so its not really in the cards......although replacing them every year or so isn't that cheap either, justified upgrade??
 

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I got them online through rock auto. After I get my core refunded they cost a little over $50 dollars each. Cheaper than the parts store. Doesn't your parts store offer warranty? Auto zone and the like usually offer lifetime replacement on a lot of parts.

Also have to buy new pads and rotors...
 

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Most carry a 1 year warranty so i have got a couple free one. I may go with the 4runner parts next time, it's more about the problem than it is the money though. A few times it hasn't been in the most convenient of places that they decide they want to start to freeze, one of my rims now has HEAVY baked on brake dust that ironX, clay bars, and my polisher can't touch from having to drive it to my tools.
 

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Just a thought, I accidentally used the wrong type of brake fluid on the rear brake of a Harley I had, it was constantly seizing up.
Once I realized what I did and flushed the system/replaced the caliper ...... all was good. :eek:
 

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The calipers seize on the inside. I would say your fluid is saturated with water. Flush the entire system with quality brake fluid. I use ATE 200. Its a DOT 4 with high heat resistance. Then flush every 12 months. Up north you get a lot of condensation. Also check the cap on the resevior to make sure it seals.
 

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^^ Agree with above, that many calipers would indicate to me, water in the line . Do a complete flush with the new calipers and see how that works out .
 

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G'Day,
Might be different Down Under, but yoda specify DOT 3 here, and strongly suggest not to use DOT4.
so check your manual .... and flush with the right stuff...
cheers
Baz
:blueblob:
 

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Were you flushing the entire system after every caliper replacement with brake fluid from a freshly-unsealed container?

This many seized pistons in such a short period would be a very unusual unless the fluid was not being flushed, or you were using fluid that was already moisture-saturated, or there was some other factor involved in getting water in the fluid.

Do you pressure-wash your engine bay frequently without covering the brake fluid reservoir?

Any time you perform any type of service on the "wet" components of the brake system, remove all the fluid from the reservoir with turkey-baster or large syringe, refill with fluid from a newly-opened container of brake fluid, and flush all four calipers until you see virgin fluid. A pressure-bleeder makes this a very easy one-man job without the risk of driving the master cylinder piston seals past their normal working stroke.
 

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DrCoffee hit the nail on the head. Brake fluid is hygroscopic meaning it absorbs water. I've read it can absorb 1-2% moisture per year. Meaning that in 10 years (a 2007) that's never had the fluid bled you could have 10-20% water in the system. The water of course settles in the lowest spot it can which is that bottom piston of the caliper. This in turn causes breaking issues as the water gets boiled on hard breaking events and causes corrosion of the piston.
 

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They also seize if the brake pads get too thin....this exposes a lot of the piston sides and they start to catch and get cruddy if the seals no longer work well.

I just took my calipers and rotors off this weekend to clean them up and found a ton of mud, and even rocks in them from offroading like 6 weeks ago. What a mess. IH8MUD


I would agree fluid is likely the biggest culprit. They say every TWO YEARS!
 

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just to add here with the yearly fluid brake fluid change you should be completing. Like every above says will helps clear any water or containments from the fluid.

A reason you may be experiencing this is because the front calipers are dual piston (rears are only single piston). Without proper maintenance on the front calipers you might get containments around the boots of the pistons. Once you have one piston on the front caliper that begins to seize then its downhill from there. The other piston will take over as the primary piston and the other piston just seizes to work (like braking a leg and don't fix it you will never use it). I've had the same problem you were getting and now I flush every year or depends on my mileage (currently on 4 years same brakes but just regular maintenance).
 

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G'Day,
Might be different Down Under, but yoda specify DOT 3 here, and strongly suggest not to use DOT4.
I have used DOT5.1 without any problems. I take pistons out after every 3 year and lubricate them by brake vaseline. I have the original 11 year old calibers despite of wet and salty winters.

You should pull out the pistons of new calibers and lubricate them well before first install. Some thick brake grease/vaseline is the key.
 
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