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Right now I have the Walker Evans Coilovers with adjustable reservoirs on just the front of my rig. I am planning on raising my rear in a couple of weeks and will need to bring up my front end to compensate. What is the best way for me to adjust my height? Should I jack the front end up? Take off the wheels? Should I put anything on the collar to help it move any better? I've heard of people needing to cut the spanner wrench so they can get a full turn. Is there anything else that will make this easier?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
:bump:
 

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The spanner wrench method is difficult and slow. Try using a hammer and punch.
 

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Thanks Fjamming, did you jack up your front to adjust or can you do it with the tires on the ground?
 

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I did it on the ground. I did it just because I wanted to try. It was at the height that I wanted when I had it. I just moved it a little just to see then moved it back.
 

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Right now I have the Walker Evans Coilovers with adjustable reservoirs on just the front of my rig. I am planning on raising my rear in a couple of weeks and will need to bring up my front end to compensate. What is the best way for me to adjust my height? Should I jack the front end up? Take off the wheels? Should I put anything on the collar to help it move any better? I've heard of people needing to cut the spanner wrench so they can get a full turn. Is there anything else that will make this easier?

OK, I've adjusted the height on my rig numerous times and I know how to do it the easy way.

1)Take an initial measurement with your truck sitting on the ground from the bottom black front fender down to the ground. Do this for both sides, they should be the same if the truck is on flat ground and the height was adjusted correctly the first time. Write that down.

2)Next, Raise the front of the truck up by placing a 2x4 under your skid plate and using a good jack so that the front wheels are at full droop (they are all they way off the ground and the suspension won't go any lower).

3)Using the spanner provided (or sometimes you might need to use a punch and a couple of box wrenches as a lever), you should be able to easily turn ONE full revolution 360 degrees on the adjustment ring. NOTE: You should never have to use a HAMMER! To make this easier place a mark on the ring before you begin that faces directly out toward you if your are looking at the shock from the wheel well. This mark will act as your counter. After completing one revolution on each side lower the truck and take your measurements again to see how much lift ONE revolution gives you.

If one revolution only nets you 1/32 inch try two on each side the next time you go to raise it some more.

Note of caution: When you are tightening or loosening the adjustment nutt the entire body of the shock will rotate a bit and you could damage your reservoir line if you are not careful. I used a small nut and placed it between the top of the shock and where the shock mounts to the truck to stop the shock from rotating under loosening or tightening. Look in the picture in this post at the top of the WE (the red part) you will see the gold bolt and it goes through the black mounting plate. Well, next to the red part is a gap on both sides. Now if you want to loosen or tighten the lift when you go to turn the ring the entire coil will want to move until it binds up on the bolt at the top. To prevent the entire thing from moving you just jam the right size nut into the gap in between the red part of the shock and the black mounting plate to prevent it from turning while you apply torque...

Repeat my steps until you reach the desired lift.

HTH

Frog
 

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Thanks Frogeye, when you have done this before do you use anything like WD40 to lube up the ring?
 

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I did it on the ground. I did it just because I wanted to try. It was at the height that I wanted when I had it. I just moved it a little just to see then moved it back.
Tony, Trying to adjust your shocks on the ground is a great way to break the adjustment ring by using too much force (your punch and hammer idea). It's the wrong way to do it man.

When the vehicle is lifted so that the tires are off the ground there is a hell of a lot less resistance or weight on the adjustment ring. You should never have to use a hammer to adjust the shocks. If the adjustment spanner won't work well on one side, use a punch that fits the hole and two box wrenches as a lever. If you don't understand what I'm saying, let me know I'll take a picture of this technique and post it later today.

Chris
 

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I had to take about an 1/8 off my spanner wrench to get it in there on the Drivers side...I did exactly what FrogEye did...using silicone spray and it turned like a charm.
 

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Tony, Trying to adjust your shocks on the ground is a great way to break the adjustment ring by using too much force (your punch and hammer idea). It's the wrong way to do it man.

When the vehicle is lifted so that the tires are off the ground there is a hell of a lot less resistance or weight on the adjustment ring. You should never have to use a hammer to adjust the shocks. If the adjustment spanner won't work well on one side, use a punch that fits the hole and two box wrenches as a lever. If you don't understand what I'm saying, let me know I'll take a picture of this technique and post it later today.

Chris
Chris, I only did it to see how much effort is needed. I didn't turn more then a 1/4 turn.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
This is great info guys. Thanks for the advice.
 

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OK, I've adjusted the height on my rig numerous times and I know how to do it the easy way.

1)Take an initial measurement with your truck sitting on the ground from the bottom black front fender down to the ground. Do this for both sides, they should be the same if the truck is on flat ground and the height was adjusted correctly the first time. Write that down.

2)Next, Raise the front of the truck up by placing a 2x4 under your skid plate and using a good jack so that the front wheels are at full droop (they are all they way off the ground and the suspension won't go any lower).

3)Using the spanner provided (or sometimes you might need to use a punch and a couple of box wrenches as a lever), you should be able to easily turn ONE full revolution 360 degrees on the adjustment ring. NOTE: You should never have to use a HAMMER! WTF?!!! To make this easier place a mark on the ring before you begin that faces directly out toward you if your are looking at the shock from the wheel well. This mark will act as your counter. After completing one revolution on each side lower the truck and take your measurements again to see how much lift ONE revolution gives you.

If one revolution only nets you 1/32 inch try two on each side the next time you go to raise it some more.

Note of caution: When you are tightening or loosening the adjustment nutt the entire body of the shock will rotate a bit and you could damage your reservoir line if you are not careful. I used a small nut and placed it between the top of the shock and where the shock mounts to the truck to stop the shock from rotating under loosening or tightening.

Repeat my steps until you reach the desired lift.

HTH

Frog
I just found a typo. It said, "fool droop." WTH? Draggo are you messing with me? I know I typed, "full droop." That's a really weird homophone to mess up. Here you go Jeshua :rofl:
 

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The hole size is 1/4" - another way is to buy a cheap phillips screwdriver that has a 1/4" round shank, cut the tip off and now you have an adjuster thats a bit longer (better leverage) and a nice comfy handle (got this tip from a few customers). Its also helpful to go a step further and disconnect the upper a-arm from the spindle, it can then adjust with relative ease - which is how we make adjustments in our shop.
 
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