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To my knowledge there are no upgraded after market shafts out there on the market yet. I looked hard for them myself.

What is killing your shafts are your mods. You upgraded the gears and also went with a lower ratio, added a locker and went with 35" tires. Basically a perfect recipe for snapping birchfields.

Spinning wildly in the mud and then the tire grabbed is what snapped them. Unless you find better CVs (and if you do tell all of us) you will continue to snap them driving like that with the setup you have on your rig.
 

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If you want to play in the mud like that I'd suggest something with a solid front axle insted of IFS
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Frustrating.

One more vote to sell my baby.

I know all pro was developing a solid front axle conversion, but most likely it will be very cost prohibitive.
 

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I don't mean to sound rude, but when you break one axle....it is NOT in your best interest to continue on until you break the second.

There were other vehicles there. When you broke, you should've let them pull you out, fixed the broken part and gone on.

To answer your questions: No, I don't think there are any aftermarket upgrade CV half shafts for your FJC. You could probably call Cone Industries and have a VERY expensive set of custom 300M joints/shafts made up....but I don't think that's a good idea in terms of ROI.

I think number 3 is going to be your best option if you insist on driving like you did in the video....though another option would be to upgrade the axle with a solid axle swap. For the way you seem to want to drive, I'd recommend at least a 1 ton front axle. The SAS would be of more benefit to you and be a better return on your money in terms of capability and durability than going with expensive custom 300M shafts/CVs.

If you were to go to option 3, what would be your choice? Rubicon? Fullsize SFA Dodge or Ford? Used Mog? There just isn't a lot out there with a full body anymore that has really robust axles/drivetrain and those that do are really heavy (not generally good for mud) or have diesel....not the greatest in really cold environments like AK.

Is this going to be your daily driver or just a play rig? We need more info.

Sean
 

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At this point I have three options. I refuse to continue a vehicle that has twice attempted to strand me in the middle of no-where, Alaska.

1) I can fix it, and just not wheel it. (not gonna happen)
2)I can find an upgrade and be happy
3)I can sell it and get something that can handle a moderate amount of wheel spin.

I hate to do it but I am thinking the latter is most likely to happen.

PLEASE HELP!!!

PM or email me at [email protected]
With all due respect, as Sean said, you will need a seriously STRONG drive train to handle your definition of "moderate amount of wheel spin". From what I heard on the video, it sounds like you were banging up on the rev-limiter.

If you had your ARB front locker engaged during that kind of wheel spin, you were begging for a CV failure. With that kind of wheel spin, being locked with IFS, any traction on one side and not the other will snap the CV's just as quick as you demonstrated on the video.

No real surprise in my eyes. Good luck with your decision but I also vote for option 3 considering your driving style and preferences...
 

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Let me be clear too....I re-read my response and it sounds too much like I'm picking on your driving style. I'm actually not. I think you don't have much choice when it comes to deep mud like you were driving in.

Granted, running in reverse trying to get unstuck is an axle's weakest position and after breaking the first axle, you should have stopped to fix it, but other than that....I don't really fault your driving style for the first breakage at all.

You have good sized tires, a locking front diff, a decent power plant and a very heavy vehicle combined with a weak link front drive system....

Again, your best bet is a new platform or to really get serious about modifying this one.

HTH,
Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
This is my daily driver that I use off road every once in a while and for a rescue rig. A majority of alaska is mud and in order to get through mud, you need wheelspin to clear the tires. Thus the revving of the engine.

Going full size is over kill and I dont need to do that. Just before I went in, a cherokee fully locked went through the same mud hole and he is locked, geared and running 35;s like me. He also has a dana 30 that did not break. after him, a little toyota pickup locked and tired, no gears went thru. I think he is running a dana 30 as well. after him, a 92 jeep (xj?) went thru, tires, no gears, 34's. no breaky-breaky. big wheel spin all around in order to get thru.

Flaming me for doing what three other rigs just did is pointless. I dont insist on driving that way, but if you putter, you will get stuck,and overheat and fry your winch because you will always be stuck.

I also have a built 43 gpw with all the bells and whistles, but wanted to run this because of the mission. As far as i could tell, the second one broke not because I had contact with solid ground, but because I had the tires turned too far over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Agreed, Sean.

I think I just need something a little less off road to reduce the temptation to drive it off road, then only the gpw will go off road..

The vehicle I am thinking of is midsize, fourwheel drive, can haul the gpw or two snowmachines and good on gas. I am thinking ford f-150 4 door shortbed, cherokee, or grand, maybe another jeep. Diesels work fine up here, just have to plug them in when it gets cold, no biggie, the gas mileage is definitly an attraction.
 

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I was not aware the first one had broken, If I did, I obviously would have stopped right then and there. when the second one broke, the truck stopped moving. Only then did I realize there was a problem.

This is my daily driver that I use off road every once in a while and for a rescue rig. A majority of alaska is mud and in order to get through mud, you need wheelspin to clear the tires. Thus the revving of the engine.

Going full size is over kill and I dont need to do that. Just before I went in, a cherokee fully locked went through the same mud hole and he is locked, geared and running 35;s like me. He also has a dana 30 that did not break. after him, a little toyota pickup locked and tired, no gears went thru. I think he is running a dana 30 as well. after him, a 92 jeep (xj?) went thru, tires, no gears, 34's. no breaky-breaky. big wheel spin all around in order to get thru.

Flaming me for doing what three other rigs just did is pointless. I dont insist on driving that way, but if you putter, you will get stuck,and overheat and fry your winch because you will always be stuck.

I also have a built 43 gpw with all the bells and whistles, but wanted to run this because of the mission. As far as i could tell, the second one broke not because I had contact with solid ground, but because I had the tires turned too far over.
You probably wrote this while I was typing out my second response....so please read that....Flaming you wasn't my intent.

As for your comments on the other rigs....with the Cherokee you have a more valid point than with the others b/c they aren't locked. Unlocked rigs rarely break axles b/c they can't send power to a wheel with traction. Since binding b/c of traction is what generally breaks axles....unlocked rigs are usually less likely to break in the first place. Once you get lockers f/r, you generally cannot do big, smokey burnouts without breaking axles unless you are really light weight and/or have really strong axles in terms of either alloy upgrades or 1 ton running gear.

Keep in mind with the Cherokee though that it is also MUCH lighter than a FJC and has a SFA. Both reasons why it didn't break. As crappy as a D30 front axle is, it's still stronger than most IFS front ends.

If the second broke b/c it was turned too far over, then you need to adjust the steering stops to not allow that or there is something else wrong. Do your tires bind against the body mount or inner fenders? This can bind enough to cause breakage as well.

If you didn't hear the first one break....it's understandable....with the windows up and power applied, it's noisy, but I'd still think you'd notice (or one of the onlookers would've hopefully told you) that one wheel wasn't pulling.

As for the fullsize thing....I'm not recommending you go fullsize....I was asking what would option 3 include? I assumed since you have a newer vehicle, you'd be looking for a newer replacement. If that isn't the case, a SFA Toyota truck/4Runner would make a great vehicle as would a FZJ80, old FJ40 or 60, Jeep Cherokee or Sport Wrangler, CJ, YJ, etc. Hell, even a Suzuki Samuri would be good or an old Bronco or Scout. Pick your poison. I made the assumption you'd want something newer (my fault) and there just isn't much out there anymore that's got a SFA, so you are limited in newer models to choose from.

Regardless, I wish you the best of luck with your decision. It really comes down to how much you want to spend and how much you like your FJC. If you really like it, dumping $10K in a front axle swap and all that goes with it (assuming you don't do the work yourself) can be a rewarding way to go....if not, dropping $10K into an older truck/jeep is another equally good option.

This just isn't a cheap hobby.

Sorry for coming off the wrong way.

Good luck,
Sean
 

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Agreed, Sean.

I think I just need something a little less off road to reduce the temptation to drive it off road, then only the gpw will go off road..

The vehicle I am thinking of is midsize, fourwheel drive, can haul the gpw or two snowmachines and good on gas. I am thinking ford f-150 4 door shortbed, cherokee, or grand, maybe another jeep. Diesels work fine up here, just have to plug them in when it gets cold, no biggie, the gas mileage is definitly an attraction.
Thanks for understanding. I tend to type quickly and it doesn't always come across the way I intend.

Anyway, GPW's kick serious ass! :) I've always liked 'em.

As for the rigs you picked....any of them should work fine, just depends on what you're looking for. Unfortunately, diesels are going to push you into that fullsize, 3/4T or larger truck. Not sure you need/want one, but they are nice for long trips....they just suck in mud. Mine sinks like the Titanic in mud. :D

Good luck,
Sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Get rid of the Terra Craplers also, they are not the best for mud. Get a set of Super Swamper LTBs or Boggers, tire choice can make a huge difference.
Agreed. These did not clear very well, which let to the spinning faster issue. I am running boggers on the GPW and am impressed with them. The CRAPplers are definitly a dissapointment. I think they are made to look cool and probably do well in the rocks. I bought the rig mostly built the was it is. If I was to do it myself, I would have only went with 33's and 3inches.

The next vehicle, Im not too concerned about full size or not, as long as the gas mileage is good and can haul a small amount. I need it to be 4 wheel drive because the weather requires it.
 

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I'm going to say the same thing as Sean. You're a great candidate for a D60 solid axle swap, and 37" tires.

The weak link in our IFS systems is the bearing retainer inside the outer CV joint. 35" tires, extra torque multiplication with 4.56's, and some throttle are the recipe for destruction. That's what I have, and I've broken a CV axle too. Everyone else I know who's broken the thing has busted the same component.

There's no aftermarket upgrade for the part, but there sure seems to be a growing demand.

On the bright side, unlike a lot of people around here who are trying to figure out what to do with their FJ Cruiser modifications, you have the advantage of a very well defined goal. You simply need to figure out how to run the biggest luggiest tire you can get with the most torque possible so that you can move through mud like a paddle boat moves through water.

I, unfortunately, have to suggest that if you don't want to deal with the SAS, you might want to consider a significantly different vehicle design that utilizes much stronger axle shafts and perhaps also less gross vehicle weight. I'll be very curious to see how you decide to play this out. There aren't going to be any simple choices. I love *MY* FJ Cruiser, and I'd hate to part with it. I'm guessing this isn't a casual dilemma for you either.

I almost never see mud. We have mostly sand and rocks here in AZ. Around here, people argue about optimal tire choices for their FJ Cruisers and they have fanciful ideas about how their picks would work in deep goo, but it's mostly theory. I don't actually know if there's a best answer.

So, I'll ask you... since you obviously drive in mud.

Which do you like better in your home terrain? A wider or a narrower tire? If you could fit a wider tire that was smaller diameter, versus a larger diameter but narrow one... which would you go with?

And...

Are the mosquitoes up there really as big as they say?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Wow, a responce from THE bellydoc!! Im honored!! lol!

I actually do have the vehicle you allude to. Its a 1943 ford GPW. I have a 225 oddfire buick v-6, t-90 tranny (next break, im puttin in a t-18 out of a ford with a granny low 1st) dana 18 transmission, dana 44 full float rear with 4:88's, detroit and clear gears rear diff. I am running a dana 30 front with a ox locker and rock ram I am still sprung under, and am running 33x14 boggers to which I am very happy with. I have some motor mods, head work, cam and snorkel kit. I have four point harnesses and a cage.



I am happy so far with its performance, light agile and great power to weight ratio. The ride sucks but its worth the trade off.

I think a common misconception people have about my issue is that I am upgrading this to be a primary wheeler. Not the case. This is my daily driver that I take out when the GPW is broke or I need the storage space for a rescue or whatever.

The mosquitos are large, but more importantly there are much more of them and they are voracious. They are the number one predator of caribou (reindeer). Seriously. in areas more remote (MdKinley park, ect) the bug dope dosent work so you have to wear mosquito netting. mosquito repellant is the most important thing you bring, next to water when outdoors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Ya its been a crappy year for weather. Its been unseasonably cold and raining alot. Ask any Alaskan and they will tell ya that global warming is no myth. I can show you glaciers receding at a scary rate. Alarming is a cliche but is real. Anyways, off my soapbox, yea, deep holes.

The tire thing, I have always beleived that you should go as big as you can afford.
 
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