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Hi Every body..
First my English is sucks so be careful ^_^
I got an idea and i was wondering if anyone tried it here?
Due to the high gasoline prices these a days I was thinking to make my 2007 Manual FJ 2 WD instead of 4WD by taking a drive shaft that connects the back wheels with the front wheels, and that takes 15 mins to do if i am not mistaken!!?

I am assuming i will get 3 extra miles / galon..

anyone have more ideas about that ?

Thanks all..:rocker:
 

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huh?
 

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IMO I don't know if it's possible, but I question the benefit of doing it compared to having it. Might as well drive a prius. Just my opinion.
 

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I'm assuming the 6sp is full all wheel drive? Are you asking if you pull one of the driveshafts it'll increase fuel mileage by going to 2 wheel drive only?
 

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^^^Yes the manuals are full time all wheel drive.
 

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I'm assuming the 6sp is full all wheel drive? Are you asking if you pull one of the driveshafts it'll increase fuel mileage by going to 2 wheel drive only?
because my english as bad as his .... i understand him ....

yes his question is pull one of the driveshafts it'll increase fuel mileage by going to 2 wheel drive only?
 

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It's at least a interesting question. I'm not sure what happens to the center dif, when you remove one drive shaft.
Let's cut the guy some slack. I think it's a reasonable question. It may work though.
I highly doubt it would add 3 miles per gallon, but maybe a mile or so.
 

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I wasn't knocking him, I was asking the question I thought he was asking.

I wonder if the center diff, needs some kind of a "load" on it? If a true and definite answer can't be found or given, the only thing to do is experiment and try it.

Back in 2000 when I bought my Dodge pickup, the dealer had a new 2500 Ram customized for a landscaper/contractor. The interior of the bed lowered to the ground and you would drop the tailgate and load your "stuff" straight in and the raise the bed back up. Not like a dump truck but like an elevator. Think of those catering trucks at the airport but going down not up.

Whew...any-a-who, it was front wheel drive. It had all the typical running gear of a four wheel drive but had the rear drive shaft removed so the bed could do it's thing. Actually no rear axle either. Two independent spindles ,one on either side. Pretty funky. But it was a 3/4 ton set up dedicated to the front wheel drive of the transfer case.

You could always find an industrial area, nice and quiet on a Sunday morning. Grab a few tools and pull one or the other driveshaft and see what happens.
 

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Having removed the rear drive shaft (not on my FJ) on two occasions for emergency repairs in the field I can tell you a few issues you are going to run into. First, there is nothing to hold the output shafts in place if you remove the drive shaft. I had to remove the input/output shafts as well and wire a piece of inner tube around the transfer case and differential receivers to keep the gear oil from completely leaking out.

Now that is just the physical part. Considering the 6MT is full time 4wd and the computer is expecting to be monitoring all for wheels for traction I would assume not having any traction on two wheels (at least that is what the computer will think) will produce some unfavorable results with the traction control and the ABS.

I would very much not recommend removing a drive shaft as a gas saving solution. Just the anomaly in the traction control might even make it use more gas trying to constantly maintain traction.

Something else you should be aware of. You aren't actually commanding the gas when you push the pedal. You are sending a signal to the computer telling it you want to go faster. The computer then runs through its algorithms to determine exactly how much fuel it add, send torque to which wheel etc. Altering systems without understanding the whole picture is never a good idea.
 

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Even removing the front drive shaft the weight of the front axle will still be there, just maybe save some tire wear. Don't think that you'd save much fuel though
 
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