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Has anyone ever used or have a belt driven air compressor? I'm just curious as I look into compressed air solutions and saw a YouTube video talking about extreme outback belt driven air compressors.
I'm just wondering if someone was able to fit one and what else they had to do for such a setup. I am only looking into this because of the speed and reliability they offer over something like an ARB dual compressor but isn't something I have to get filled up like a power tank that has the potential to leave me without air on long overland trips. It should also be able to run air tools continuously if needed. If anyone has some other ideas feel free to shoot them out. This probably won't happen very soon if I do decide to do it but just doing some research in my down time.
 

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Don't have air lockers or air suspension, so no experience. I've seen folks use the ARB unit with air lockers.

I have a VIAIR 400P-Automatic

I've only used it for airing up my tires a few times, convenient, portable and not too expensive. I keep it in the recovery drawer.

Google link back to Forum on the ARB

Good luck,
 

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That ARB dual compressor pumps out of 5cfm with 100% duty cycle I believe, unless you sandblasting out on the trail I don’t think you need any more…and the impatient guys get the CO2 tanks (which will fill a 35” tire from 10-35 psi something like 40 times) before it needs to be filled. I had a CO2 tank before, worked great and fast, I went ARB this time because I didn’t want to take up space in my cargo area and wanted something always present and never low on air. I really love having a compressor under the hood now, and it doesn’t take up any usable space (except maybe for a second battery or other engine accessories).
 

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I had a friend install a York compressor into his JK. I'm not sure if he ever got it going properly or not... he moved before I knew.

Some older 4x4 guys would remove the air conditioner and put the belt driven air compressor in it's place.

I for one would not sacrifice a/c... lol.

 

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I had a friend install a York compressor into his JK. I'm not sure if he ever got it going properly or not... he moved before I knew.

Some older 4x4 guys would remove the air conditioner and put the belt driven air compressor in it's place.

I for one would not sacrifice a/c... lol.

I grew up with dad having two compressors on both small block and straight six Chevy motors. He tried that in the spark plug compressor until I dropped a spark plug into the dirt after being told to hook it up one time.
 

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Has anyone ever used or have a belt driven air compressor? I'm just curious as I look into compressed air solutions and saw a YouTube video talking about extreme outback belt driven air compressors.
I'm just wondering if someone was able to fit one and what else they had to do for such a setup. I am only looking into this because of the speed and reliability they offer over something like an ARB dual compressor but isn't something I have to get filled up like a power tank that has the potential to leave me without air on long overland trips. It should also be able to run air tools continuously if needed.
On the older trucks such a compressor typically replaces the air conditioner compressor. And in some cases I think people even use the AC compressor as the air compressor. I doubt that too many of us would be willing to give up AC to get a belt-driven air compressor.

The main issue with the ARBs mounted under-hood is heat soak from the engine. They're already hot from a day of wheeling when you go to use them. They're fine for short bursts to force an air locker but I wouldn't rely on them for using a lot of air over a long period of time unless the engine was cold.

If anyone has some other ideas feel free to shoot them out. This probably won't happen very soon if I do decide to do it but just doing some research in my down time.
My advice, if you aren't needing a compressor for a front locking diff: buy a good portable air compressor and a 1-gallon reservoir tank. When you're airing up tires, just use the compressor. When you're running air tools, put the air tank in-line. Let's be honest, "run air tools continuously needed" is highly highly unlikely to happen on the trail. You're not out there rotating tires, breaking / tightening 24 lugs. Do you carry an air drill, or just an impact gun?

I have a wall-mounted air compressor at home, 2HP oil-less motor, big tank. Ever since buying a 1/2-inch DeWalt impact, the only time I use my air is to fill tires. The electric impact handles everything else. Rather than spend a lot of money on a big complex air setup to occasionally run an impact gun on a few nuts on the trail, I'd just take a couple of batteries off the charger before each trip.
 

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The main issue with the ARBs mounted under-hood is heat soak from the engine. They're already hot from a day of wheeling when you go to use them. They're fine for short bursts to force an air locker but I wouldn't rely on them for using a lot of air over a long period of time unless the engine was cold.
Obviously alot of people mount them under the hood but you're right. I wheeled with a guy in Moab during the summer. After a hot day on the trails his hose would melt and the dual compressor would shut down early. Thats why I mounted mine in the cargo area.
 

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On the older trucks such a compressor typically replaces the air conditioner compressor. And in some cases I think people even use the AC compressor as the air compressor. I doubt that too many of us would be willing to give up AC to get a belt-driven air compressor.

The main issue with the ARBs mounted under-hood is heat soak from the engine. They're already hot from a day of wheeling when you go to use them. They're fine for short bursts to force an air locker but I wouldn't rely on them for using a lot of air over a long period of time unless the engine was cold.



My advice, if you aren't needing a compressor for a front locking diff: buy a good portable air compressor and a 1-gallon reservoir tank. When you're airing up tires, just use the compressor. When you're running air tools, put the air tank in-line. Let's be honest, "run air tools continuously needed" is highly highly unlikely to happen on the trail. You're not out there rotating tires, breaking / tightening 24 lugs. Do you carry an air drill, or just an impact gun?

I have a wall-mounted air compressor at home, 2HP oil-less motor, big tank. Ever since buying a 1/2-inch DeWalt impact, the only time I use my air is to fill tires. The electric impact handles everything else. Rather than spend a lot of money on a big complex air setup to occasionally run an impact gun on a few nuts on the trail, I'd just take a couple of batteries off the charger before each trip.
Agreed, these new electric impacts really are a game changer. And with all the accessories that go with it, really a game changer. (The leaf blower works great as a mattress or air inflator)
 
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