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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
It's 3AM and I should be sleeping but I'm on a mission. I just received a pair of stock links from Singha and it got me thinking and googling. (Thank you Siri!)

I tore the boot on one of mine, and the grease got out! Singha had the same problem with one of his. The way Toyota assembled these we have no way to replace the boots either! Otherwise I would be all over these guys: PRODUCT LINE-UP: Tie Rod & Balljoint Boots

If you look at the following pics, you might be able to figure out how Toyota assembled these. Here is my theory (next post):









 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
I think Toyota presses in the spherical end shaft from the backside first (washer not yet there), puts the cap with little reverse dimple in, and swags over the back flange to hold it together. They then put on the boot, wire wrap it, and then press the washer on.

Nice design, but if you rip a boot you are screwed and have to replace the whole thing essentially. Not really necessary for a torn boot I guess, but I think of grease like a prisoner that shouldn't get out! We also know that these links are a little weak in the midsection. Sway bar collars help to prevent breakages but I still want my links reinforced.

So I am hoping to design a set for myself and am looking for a little input. I like working with aluminum for a bunch of reasons, and it seems to like me, so the body of my links are going to be billet 6061 T6. Thought about 7050 or 7075, but 6061 is cheaper and easier to come buy and the added hardness is not really necessary here. Might just make it more prone to breaking...

Think Icon lower links. That is close to what I have planned for my swaybar links. The Icon lower links are VERY well designed and I plan to purchase those when money permits.



Moving forward, I found these!



HAB-T-500 High Misalignment Series Spherical Bearings on Aurora Bearing Company

They allow 20 degrees of misalignment from the centre, for the ones I have planned due to design sizes. That's 40 degress overall. Is this overkill? The other ones on the market appear to have way less room for movement, judging by the spherical bearing design incoporated into the rod end. I know more travel is not going to hurt anything, but the stock ones seem to be able to provide closer to this amount if not more, which has me questioning the ability of a standard rod end to hold up to the abuse.

These would be pressed in, with a loctite press fit locker just to be safe. Loctite is not a substitute for a good press fit, but it does help.

From there, I could machine a ring into/out of the housing for those boots I linked to above, making them replaceable (and much more HD compared to the Toyota rubbers). I planned to use an M12 bolt, high grade (same as Toyota) from the back (back seal to be determined... possibly another one of those above boots held in place by the head of the bolt and a spacer to prevent collapse) with a machined flanged bushing that would complete the 12.7mm bore and act as the pressed on washer does on the OEM links. I might need to step up the inside bore of the spherical rod end now that I think about it. 0.7 mm is not going to make much of a bushing... :lol:

That limits the travel another degree or two... whatever. :rofl:

So what do you experts think? Does this sound viable? I want the angle built into the housing and NO threads anywhere except to bolt the link in. The Toyota ones are great, minus the flimsy rod, and I think threads add a weak point. Not what I am after.

Thanks,

Joel
 

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You've no doubt seen the ones from All Pro. Are yours going to be like those, or with longer connecting shafts, like the stock ones?
 

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Joel:

The front swaybar links do not need to be adjustable in length so I like your idea of machining the link body out of AL6061-T6 and press in the spherical bearings to allow for angular misalignment. I think it's possible to use smaller grade 10.9 metric bolts or grade 8 standard bolts for the spherical bearings similar to the ICON UCAs (another great design by Dylan Evans) and have the Energy Suspension polyurethane dustcaps on one side and aluminum caps on the other side. Here are a few photos of the DR UCAs installed on FJ#8's FJC:



(photos courtesy of anumeric)

I look forward to see photos of your prototype front swaybar links. BTW, the rear swaybar links would be even simpler with just one spherical bearing at the bottom end and a threaded rod on top. :bigthumb:

Thong

...

So I am hoping to design a set for myself and am looking for a little input. I like working with aluminum for a bunch of reasons, and it seems to like me, so the body of my links are going to be billet 6061 T6. Thought about 7050 or 7075, but 6061 is cheaper and easier to come buy and the added hardness is not really necessary here. Might just make it more prone to breaking...

Think Icon lower links. That is close to what I have planned for my swaybar links. The Icon lower links are VERY well designed and I plan to purchase those when money permits.



Moving forward, I found these!



HAB-T-500 High Misalignment Series Spherical Bearings on Aurora Bearing Company

They allow 20 degrees of misalignment from the centre, for the ones I have planned due to design sizes. That's 40 degress overall. Is this overkill? The other ones on the market appear to have way less room for movement, judging by the spherical bearing design incoporated into the rod end. I know more travel is not going to hurt anything, but the stock ones seem to be able to provide closer to this amount if not more, which has me questioning the ability of a standard rod end to hold up to the abuse.

These would be pressed in, with a loctite press fit locker just to be safe. Loctite is not a substitute for a good press fit, but it does help.

From there, I could machine a ring into/out of the housing for those boots I linked to above, making them replaceable (and much more HD compared to the Toyota rubbers). I planned to use an M12 bolt, high grade (same as Toyota) from the back (back seal to be determined... possibly another one of those above boots held in place by the head of the bolt and a spacer to prevent collapse) with a machined flanged bushing that would complete the 12.7mm bore and act as the pressed on washer does on the OEM links. I might need to step up the inside bore of the spherical rod end now that I think about it. 0.7 mm is not going to make much of a bushing... :lol:

That limits the travel another degree or two... whatever. :rofl:

So what do you experts think? Does this sound viable? I want the angle built into the housing and NO threads anywhere except to bolt the link in. The Toyota ones are great, minus the flimsy rod, and I think threads add a weak point. Not what I am after.

Thanks,

Joel
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sounds great when can I have mine.
Hahaha. I'd have to test the crap out of them first of course.

I look forward to seeing what you come up with
Thanks.

Will your design have a boot?
Yup. Better than stock. And replaceable too! That was just dumb on Toyota's part, but they are effective and cheap to produce that way. Too bad they aren't cheap to replace! :flame:

You've no doubt seen the ones from All Pro. Are yours going to be like those, or with longer connecting shafts, like the stock ones?
Essentially when I am done the link will be one piece plus bolts. Much stronger and it will have boots for sure!

Thanks TCao. I especially like the aluminum cap idea. I hope to hear back from Aurora bearing on Monday. I have a feeling those spherical bearings will be pricey as they are mil spec...

I was worried about the smaller bolts floating around in the hole but I am sure I could make up something to aid proper alignment.

:cheers:
 

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Joel-

When you get to the point of selling your links I recommend adding some type of disclaimer or recommendation: "In order to gain optimum performance and longevity of your new links a set of after-market sway-bar clamps is highly recommended to keep your new aligned". Maybe sell your own clamps and links as a set? Regardless of how stout you build the links they will break under the wrong circumstances but at least keeping the sway bar and links centered will avoid many of the failures we have seen in the past.

I look forward to seeing the final product. Happy R&Ding. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Joel-

When you get to the point of selling your links I recommend adding some type of disclaimer or recommendation: "In order to gain optimum performance and longevity of your new links a set of after-market sway-bar clamps is highly recommended to keep your new aligned". Maybe sell your own clamps and links as a set? Regardless of how stout you build the links they will break under the wrong circumstances but at least keeping the sway bar and links centered will avoid many of the failures we have seen in the past.

I look forward to seeing the final product. Happy R&Ding. :)
Good idea. I am making myself some clamps too, but I think I am going to chuck those and remake them. I decided I want to put in some relief so they actually reinforce the stock ones instead of replace them. Don't worry Layton, I haven't forgotten about you!

Joel you never stop do ya?!





Good luck with this! Looks you got another winner.
Thanks Dominic!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·


Fully aligned.



20 degree misalignment. Head of bolt clears wall of bore! Sorry if I get a little too excited but I can't wait to try these out.

Note, I only moved the bolt 20 degrees. In real life that bushing and the spherical bearing would move as well, but this was too much work to attempt for my solid modeling skills. The bolt was rotated about the centre of the bearing so it should be very accurate to real life, even though the bearing and sleeve stayed put in the rendering.

Now I just need a cap to hold the grease in the backside with an O-ring and to wait for the parts to arrive.

Each assembly will need 2 bolts (80 and 90mm), 2 energy suspension boots, 2 high misalingment spherical bearings, 2 flanged bushings, one billet housing, two caps with seal, and a bunch of grease.

Flange thickness will be adjusted to suit boots when they arrive to provide maximum seal. I've already ordered the boots, just waiting for the mailman.

Design note: the centre of rotation of each spherical bearing is aligned with the center of the shaft. Toyota's were not designed this way, which may explain a potential to twist at the welds.

So what do you think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Anyone know of any good semi-permanent sealants? I am thinking a nice push fit with a little sealant should hold the backside caps in place. There will be a provision to pry them out if you need to service the link.

Thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Looks great Joel. A 12-point grade 10.9 bolt may give slightly more clearance. How about using a nylon locking snap-in plug? The plugs should keep out dirt (but not moisture).
I ordered some caps. Got some nickel plated steel and some plastic ones. For $10 a pack or less you can't go wrong.

Looking for new bolts...
 
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