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What about performing a vacuum bleeding procedure? Anyone done it that way? If you have, did you have to turn on the key to get it done?
 

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I just bled my brakes this last weekend. I had my son pump the brake pedal while I used a 10 mm wrench to open the bleeder valve. Flushed out all the old fluid. Brakes work a lot better now :)
 

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Anyone got anything to comment on about the vacuum bleeding method?

Something I also noticed in my 2011 FJ manual about bleeding the brakes. They said that only when bleeding the rear brakes does the motor come on during the procedure and that the pedal doesn't need to be pumped then, only held down so that the motor will run and push out the old fluid and to not let the motor run for more than 100 seconds at a time. According the the manual, the motor apparently doesn't activate while doing the front set, and they also warn about having to reset any trouble codes that get thrown. Has anyone noticed this while doing their brake bleeding using the 2 person pedal method and have you had any TDC's been thrown?
 

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Anyone got anything to comment on about the vacuum bleeding method?

Something I also noticed in my 2011 FJ manual about bleeding the brakes. They said that only when bleeding the rear brakes does the motor come on during the procedure and that the pedal doesn't need to be pumped then, only held down so that the motor will run and push out the old fluid and to not let the motor run for more than 100 seconds at a time. According the the manual, the motor apparently doesn't activate while doing the front set, and they also warn about having to reset any trouble codes that get thrown. Has anyone noticed this while doing their brake bleeding using the 2 person pedal method and have you had any TDC's been thrown?
I`ve never had a code thrown for bleeding the brakes. This is the simplest project in the world to do. It takes a total of 10 minutes to do all 4 brake lines. I think some people over think these procedures. Just do it :)
 

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Just bleed the farthest line first and work your way to the shortest, replenish the fluid in the reservoir before it drains it's cavity (there is a cavity for front and rear divided in the single reservoir). This way you wont get air introduced into the circuit, which could be much more difficult to remove. This method is safe and plenty effective and can be done all by your lonesome. You can hang a small 1 quart bottle or so at each caliper as I make my rounds and use clear tubing to fit tightly over the bleeder screw. Place the hose down in the bottle with about an inch of fluid. Open the bleeder and then slowly push the brake pedal down until it stops, let off slowly and repeat. With the hose in the fluid it will not suck air back into the system. Cycle 5 or so times, tighten the bleeder, refill the reservoir and move on. It will take 15 minutes and your done. I generally drain most of each circuits fluid (one front, one rear) on the first cycle, that keeps the new fluid from being contaminated by the old. Alternatively you could pump the fluid from the reservoir, full with fresh and then begin the bleed cycle. The only time you should have to bleed a master cylinder is if you replace it. GL
 

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Anyone got anything to comment on about the vacuum bleeding method?

Something I also noticed in my 2011 FJ manual about bleeding the brakes. They said that only when bleeding the rear brakes does the motor come on during the procedure and that the pedal doesn't need to be pumped then, only held down so that the motor will run and push out the old fluid and to not let the motor run for more than 100 seconds at a time. According the the manual, the motor apparently doesn't activate while doing the front set, and they also warn about having to reset any trouble codes that get thrown. Has anyone noticed this while doing their brake bleeding using the 2 person pedal method and have you had any TDC's been thrown?
This is what I've used for years making it a one man job.
https://www.amazon.com/Mityvac-MV8000-Automotive-Test-Bleeding/dp/B00265M9SS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1466141260&sr=8-1&keywords=mitty+vac
 

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I don't have that unit, just a high quality hand vacuum pump and a large jar with fittings for the hoses. It's worked fine for all my other cars, but only one of them had anti-lock brakes, and it worked great for that car too. I guess if I can't get my spouse slave to pump the brakes when I want to do the job, I'll use my vacuum pump setup. By the way, what do you use the seal the threads on the bleeders so that air won't be pulled in around the threads when they are under a vacuum RomaBoy? I've tried thread tape and really thick silicone grease, but I tend to still get a few bubbles being pulled around the threads during the bleeding process.
 

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Kaiju,

I never put anything on the bleeder threads myself. I know what you're referring to but that only happens if you opened the bleeder too much. In the end to be sure you have all the air out you can crack the bleeder slightly until it drips brake fluid which is known as "gravity bleed". :cheers:
 

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Kaiju,

I never put anything on the bleeder threads myself. I know what you're referring to but that only happens if you opened the bleeder too much. In the end to be sure you have all the air out you can crack the bleeder slightly until it drips brake fluid which is known as "gravity bleed". :cheers:
Thanks. I just wondered if anyone else using this method had a better solution. I've experimented around because those little bubbles always bothered me and found that putting a particularly thick silicone plumber's grease spread around the top of the thread area really helps cut that issue down. The darn stuff has the consistency of molasses which keeps it around the threads. A small amount of it will get drawn into the thread area, which then blocks any air from being in. On the plus side, once it's worked it's way into the threads, it helps to keep corrosion of the threads at bay since it's waterproof.
 
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