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Discussion Starter #1
On my way back from lunch break today I had my brake light come on followed by a pulsating feel in the brake pedal at a stop. Then the abs light came on and a few others lights which I can't remember. As I'm pulling into work a hear an odd sound from under the hood, the master cylinder I assume. The brakes are gone at this point and I had to mash the pedal to come at a stop. I pulled into a parking spot and pulled the emergency brake. I get out and there's a trail of brake fluid left behind. I trace it down to the right differential area as it's still pouring out. I got a better look after work but had to leave the FJ in the parking lot for the night. Going to try and fix it tomorrow. I believe the hard line rusted through.


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Dang, looks rough. Glad you made it safe.
 
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Brake fluid devolves paint! I prefer foaming engine cleaner and a good power washing. It will also make the environment you are making repairs in more hospitable.

Of corse, as per FJ custom, now is a good time for upgrades!

Glad you are safe.
 

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Crikey!
That ended about as well as it could!
Maybe a goo time for all of us to check our brake lines.

Glad you & the FJ are OK - make sure you give it a good clean under there and re-do all your anti-corrosion treatment once you've repaired & checked the rest of the lines!
 

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For what it is it ended very well. I`m going to look at mine now just because. Thanks for posting up :)
 

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Jesus, Mary, and Joseph!...that must have been scary. As others have stated, glad you escaped with only a scare.

Out of curiosity, have you had the brakes serviced recently? That's a fairly catastrophic failure to suddenly manifest itself.
 

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Below is a quick schematic of your brake system (2007 Factory Manual).

1146121


In that the braking system has independent control of front and rear wheels, it seems odd both would fail at the same time. Glad you are safe. Good luck with the repairs.
 

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Jesus, Mary, and Joseph!...that must have been scary. As others have stated, glad you escaped with only a scare.

Out of curiosity, have you had the brakes serviced recently? That's a fairly catastrophic failure to suddenly manifest itself.
Not necessarily. I had a similar incident about 18 months ago. Dang underbody rust got the better of one of the lines in the back. Gave out in the middle of afternoon rush hour traffic but thankfully I was close to home. Nearby mechanic buddy helped replace it that night.
 

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FJVDB,
I certainly would not want to be in your situation. If you discover that the problem is simply a failed brake line due to rust, I would replace all the lines.

This could have been a total disaster if driving high speed in traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Everybody definitely take a look at your brake lines! It rusted through on the hard line on the rear axle.
My father has a brake line flare tool & bender and all that so he fab'd up a line that pretty well matches the factory. I'll end up buying new factory brake lines for the rear axle just to be safe. The rust is the worst on my FJ above and around the rear axle area so everyone watch out for this if you've got a rusty FJ. I was considering buying the man-a-fre stainless steel brake lines this past summer so I'll go ahead and get those ordered for my brake fresh as well. I've been looking for a project on the FJ so this is my ticket!

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Only problem with SS brake lines is when tightening fittings , make sure they are centered perfectly while tightening . They don't crush as well as standard fittings and will leak .
I bought SS lines for my 76 Corvette and had lots of problems getting them to stop leaking .
 

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Whenever I have to replace a steel brake line I use copper-nickel, because of all the reasons stated by redboat above:

cu-ni will never rust, is strong as the original steel in this application, is more ductile so the joints are easier to seal and also easier to take apart and reuse later, and is possible to form by hand reducing the need for special tools to bend to shape

Fedhill USA is a great source for the materials to make pipes like that with.
 

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My front wheel brake line came loose a yr ago. Brakes went out while driving around town at a low speed. If it would have been an hour later I would have been on the freeway 65+. 😲
 

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FWIW you should have brakes on the other axle even if you have a leak, due to the split system that is pretty standard in modern vehicles, so you will still have some ability to stop, but not nearly as good as normal.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The master cylinder was completely empty so I would think the lack of fluid would severely compromise the amount of pressure on each brake caliper. I definitely had to mash the brake to get anything out of the brakes.

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Discussion Starter #17
I found the part #s for the rear hard brake lines but having a hard time finding part numbers for the brackets that hold the fittings between the body and rear axle. My brackets are toast from rust. I had to support the bracket with a crow bar to prevent them from breaking when removing the fittings.

Hard line part #s

47327-60210
47326-60360

If anybody knows the numbers for those brackets it'd be appreciated.

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Discussion Starter #18
Whenever I have to replace a steel brake line I use copper-nickel, because of all the reasons stated by redboat above:

cu-ni will never rust, is strong as the original steel in this application, is more ductile so the joints are easier to seal and also easier to take apart and reuse later, and is possible to form by hand reducing the need for special tools to bend to shape

Fedhill USA is a great source for the materials to make pipes like that with.
Are the fittings for those copper-nickel as well? The brake lines I saw at advance that were copper-nickel just had standard steel fittings. I'd like to keep it factory but open to other options.

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Those 5 little brackets are 90461-08690, though there are also common aftermarket brake line and wire clamp brackets which will also work in their place.

In answer to your other question: the threaded fittings used with cu-ni are still steel (zinc plated). Fedhill USA sells them, their part number is M1-3

The pre-made brake pipes you can buy from the dealer are so low price (typically around $20 each) that it is hard to justify the added expense of cu-ni unless corrosion is a big concern (in your case that does seem to be a big factor), or to go through the trouble of buying straight pipe at the parts store and making one's own.

Generally what I do is use the cu-ni when I cannot buy the OEM pipe, or when I have to re-do an entire car (restoration). When doing that much, buying the stuff in bulk from Fedhill is cheaper than any of the other alternatives. To prevent rust of factory steel pipe: coat its entire length with a very liberal amount of 3M Cavity Wax, and apply some anti-seize onto the threads and between the pipe and fitting. When torquing a brake line fitting, often people overdo it and damage the steel nut, making it very difficult to remove later. The factory torque was only 15Nm, which I reduce to 9Nm when using anti-seize.
When using cu-ni, the torque is by angle: finger tight + 1/6 turn (one flat). Their technical help page is very good.

Norm
 
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