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During a brake job, I encountered what seems to be the famous broken wheel stud. I'm counting my blessings that I don't have a stuck lug nut that's just spinning and spinning, I just don't have a lug nut on that stud. I'm not a mechanical person, so just to make it easier I took it to a local garage who quoted me close to $300 (and wouldn't even use the new stud I have already, wanted me to pay $15 for their marked up stud). That seemed quite outrageous. As I said, I'm not mechanically inclined. I'm only 28 years old and this is the first truck I've owned. I know how to change a tire, oil, battery. I was involved in helping a friend replace my front pads, rotors and calipers. But I've never attempted to do any work myself. But I've read quite a few articles on here, watched quite a few videos. I have all the tools and equipment. I got a proper jack and heavy duty jack stands. I feel fairly confident. My big question that I can't seem to get answered involves the front brakes. From my understanding, I'll be using it up and putting her on stands, removing the lug nuts, removing the wheel, unbolting the caliper, sliding the caliper off, securing the caliper, removing the rotor, sliding in the new stud, tightening it to a flush level with a spare lug nut and some washers, replacing the rotor, replacing and rebolting the caliper, replacing the wheel, and securing all 6 lug nuts. My question is, if I'm keeping the same rotor on the wheel (they were just replaced about 6 months ago), is there any reason I would and/or should have to bleed the brake line? That is 1 thing I'm not familiar with, and if so, I'd probably leave it up to the professionals. Thank you for your answers, and any tips or suggestions would be appreciated!
 

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if you keep the caliper hose attached, and merely move it out of position (and support it so the hose isn't stretched / stressed), then, no, you won't have to bleed the brakes when done!

:)

It sounds like you've done your research well, the description you posted above sounds right.

When pulling the new stud "home", make sure it is fully seated against the back of the hub (any gap will allow that nut to come loose, later).

If one stud is broken, there is a risk they are all yielded and weak (possibly from a previous mechanic who massively over-tightened them, it happens all too frequently). I wonder if the garage who quoted you $300 was planning to replace all 20 studs, just to be sure?


Norm
 

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You've missed the hardest part of the job, and that's removing the broken stud from the hub.

Directly under the 'head' of the stud is a splined section about 10mm long. This splined section is press-fitted into the hub, and takes somewhere around 1,000 pounds of force to press it out. You're going to need a specialized tool (C-clamp style ball joint remover) to remove. You may see some YouTube hackers beating the stud out with a BFH, but that WILL damage the wheel bearing.

You can probably rent the ball joint tool from your local auto parts store. With the special tool, removing and replacing the stud shouldn't take more than about 15 - 20 minutes, start to finish.

(Was there a typo in your first post? You said you were "only 28 years old". Did you mean to write that you were "only 18 years old"?)

Ball joint tool.jpg
 

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Once the rotor is off there will be some stud still exposed. Take a hammer and tap it flush to the hub. Then just a punch and a hammer. I've done it plenty of times no issues.

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Once the rotor is off there will be some stud still exposed. Take a hammer and tap it flush to the hub. Then just a punch and a hammer. I've done it plenty of times no issues.

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Not the dinky little claw hammer your wife keeps in the junk drawer in the kitchen. 4# minimum. If you off road any leave it in the car for trail repair.
 

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Guys, you NEVER want to subject any rolling element bearing (ball, tapered roller, etc.) to any type of sharp. high-intensity shock loads like pounding out a wheel stud with a BFH. The reason is that the bearing balls or rollers are slightly harder than the bearing races, and subjecting the bearing to shock loads leave tiny indentations in the races. This causes bearing noise, and accelerates eventual bearing failure.

Folks will chime in that "I done it many times, and never had a problem, the wheel never fell off". The effect may be subtle, and failure won't be immediate, it primarily affects long-term bearing life. e.g. the bearing may only survive 120K miles rather than 250K miles.

If you have doubts, look up 'bearing brinelling': every bearing manufacturer on the planet specifically warns against shock loads that may cause brinelling.
 

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Come on. In your lifetime alone, how many studs have been changed out on this planet by knocking them out while on the car with no long term consequences. Or set on two pieces of wood and smacked. Let alone the last 100 years.


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Come on. In your lifetime alone, how many studs have been changed out on this planet by knocking them out while on the car with no long term consequences. Or set on two pieces of wood and smacked. Let alone the last 100 years.


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Undoubtedly thousands have been beaten out with a BFH, but I don't have any hard data on how many wheel bearings developed noise immediately after the BFH was applied, or how many subsequently failed well before they should have.

But of those who chose the BFH route, what percentage of them were astute enough to track wheel bearing life or noise levels over the next 50K or 100K miles?

Bottom line from a reliability standpoint is that you NEVER subject a rolling element bearing to extreme shock loads.

SAE published a paper on wheel bearing brinelling caused by shock loads from curb and pothole impact, and these impacts were thousands of time less severe than a direct hammer blow to the wheel hub because they were cushioned by 6"+ of rubber tire acting as a very soft snubber.

2017-09-17
Wheel Bearing Brinelling and a Vehicle Curb Impact DOE to Understand Factors Affecting Bearing Loads 2017-01-2526
As material cleanliness and bearing lubrication have improved, wheel bearings are experiencing less raceway spalling failures from rotating fatigue. Warranty part reviews have shown that two of the larger failure modes for wheel bearings are contaminant ingress and Brinell damage from curb and pothole impacts.

Or a very good write-up regarding bearing reliability and Brinelling, and how bearings become Brinelled:
Brinelling of Bearings - Maintenance World

The world's largest ball and roller bearing manufacturers like SKF, Timken, Koyo, NSK, NTN, etc. all have online bearing handling and installation guides that go into great detail about the need to protect any rolling element bearing from shock loads.

Most people don't realize that simply dropping a ball bearing on a concrete surface will inevitable cause some level of Brinell damage. Beating on a wheel hub 2 inches from the bearing with a 5 lb steel hammer applies a MUCH more severe shock load.
 

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Being new to the forum..... we are looking for accurate advice and repair options as 'best practices'. There are different repair options between; OEM recommended repair (OEM service / repair manual) and a temporary field fix to get you off the trail and back home. Short cuts have never benefited me. With tool rentals being offered through automotive parts houses why use a hammer? ...unless being broke down on the trail.

FJtest consistently submits best practices to the forum. Having had a career in heavy equipment service and failure analysis he is right on. I always look forward to his and others input/recommendations.
 

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Before you start, check your hubs for looseness, If your going to spend time on a hub, with over 80k miles on it, consider replacing both hubs. You will reset the clock on all the studs and tighten up the steering response and beat the other lugs to the punch. I had no idea how loose the hubs had become until I replaced them. Respect your time.
 

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I like the version that FJTest suggested in post #3, same tool, but that version of it comes with a bunch of adaptors to help with various tasks.
However, I just noticed that wasn't a link, just a photo.
Scrolling down Kaiju's link there are kits which include all of those adaptors ($85 ~ 130).
 

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Undoubtedly thousands have been beaten out with a BFH, but I don't have any hard data on how many wheel bearings developed noise immediately after the BFH was applied, or how many subsequently failed well before they should have.

But of those who chose the BFH route, what percentage of them were astute enough to track wheel bearing life or noise levels over the next 50K or 100K miles?

Bottom line from a reliability standpoint is that you NEVER subject a rolling element bearing to extreme shock loads.

SAE published a paper on wheel bearing brinelling caused by shock loads from curb and pothole impact, and these impacts were thousands of time less severe than a direct hammer blow to the wheel hub because they were cushioned by 6"+ of rubber tire acting as a very soft snubber.

2017-09-17
Wheel Bearing Brinelling and a Vehicle Curb Impact DOE to Understand Factors Affecting Bearing Loads 2017-01-2526
As material cleanliness and bearing lubrication have improved, wheel bearings are experiencing less raceway spalling failures from rotating fatigue. Warranty part reviews have shown that two of the larger failure modes for wheel bearings are contaminant ingress and Brinell damage from curb and pothole impacts.

Or a very good write-up regarding bearing reliability and Brinelling, and how bearings become Brinelled:
Brinelling of Bearings - Maintenance World

The world's largest ball and roller bearing manufacturers like SKF, Timken, Koyo, NSK, NTN, etc. all have online bearing handling and installation guides that go into great detail about the need to protect any rolling element bearing from shock loads.

Most people don't realize that simply dropping a ball bearing on a concrete surface will inevitable cause some level of Brinell damage. Beating on a wheel hub 2 inches from the bearing with a 5 lb steel hammer applies a MUCH more severe shock load.
Application of the force is from 2 separate directions on the bearing assembly ( curb and stud removal )so not really the most relevant data.
 

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As to the question of them not wanting to install your parts - They are assuming that you bought something cheap and they do not want to be liable for your choice.
 
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