Toyota FJ Cruiser Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Over 10 years later, I'm at the point where I have to rebuild my old Camburg UCAs.

All went well and good up to the point where the snap ring goes in. The new Uniballs are either too thick or the shoulder angle is preventing the ring from going into the groove. Everything is clean and pressed in as far as it will go, and I've even tried beating the **** out of the ring like in the video, but all that's doing is dinging up the ring. I've resorted to putting the old ones back in (without any issue), but they aren't going to last much longer

Has anyone else had this problem?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,967 Posts
Probably the new snap rings are to thick, you could always touch them with a flapper wheel or leave the old ones in if they are good shape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Probably the new snap rings are to thick, you could always touch them with a flapper wheel or leave the old ones in if they are good shape.
I thought the same thing, and tried the old ones. It looks to be about 0.0020"- 0.0030" before it seats. It's significant.

I wonder if they reengineered these to accommodate a different bearing supplier. These things were bought in 2008. I honestly have no idea how they lasted this long. I guess PTFE dry lube works.

The shoulder is much different and the new one feels a bit bigger (I don't have calipers to check).
1146014
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,967 Posts
I wouldn't lube them until necessary, keeping them clean is the way to go. Quick shot of water when washing the FJ to rinse the road crap off. The uniballs in my TC UCA last over 85k mi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
That's a pretty good run. If I can manage to get these in, I'll keep them clean
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,967 Posts
Do the old snap rings seat themselves in the ring grove?
The good thing is the motion of the (load) suspension is always pushing the uniball to the end of its seat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Both sets of rings fit fine with the old bearings. Neither set works with the new bearings.

I can push the new bearings into the UCAs by hand, so I'm sure they'd work themselves out if the snap rings don't seat
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,967 Posts
Oh.....by hand, eh? That's not good. I would measure both with a caliper ( if you have ) to be sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
It's not like there's a lot of slop. It takes a fair bit of grunting and never seize to do it. The diameter is ok, but the height is what's wonky.
For the record, I did use a press to seat them.

No calipers, so everything is by eyeball and feel. It looks about 20 thousandths too much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Put the snap rings on a belt sander and gently remove the needed amount.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
That was my last resort since I may need to thin it too much. I've reached out to Camburg to see what they say. Part of me hopes it's just a supply or quality issue, but what are the odds that both bearings are janky.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,378 Posts
I would be cautious if you can “push them in by hand”.

Any movement will cause you problems later.
I’m sure they are a interference fit just don't know the specs

I would get specific details from Camburg on what the measurements should be of both pieces, ID of your control arm bore and OD of your joint.

Might be worth a trip to a machine shop to ask them to measure for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,006 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I would be cautious if you can “push them in by hand”.

Any movement will cause you problems later.
I’m sure they are a interference fit just don't know the specs

I would get specific details from Camburg on what the measurements should be of both pieces, ID of your control arm bore and OD of your joint.

Might be worth a trip to a machine shop to ask them to measure for you.
Good point. The old bearings have a much tighter fit, but I'm not sure how much of that is due to corrosion. I wish I could read the part number on the old bearing. I'd jusr order it directly from them
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top