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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What camera and lenses are you using to shoot pixs of your FJ and the places you visit? I've got several older EOS (film) bodys and a couple of EOS lenses. We have a couple inexpensive digital cameras (Finepix 3800, Olympus sp-350 and another older one). Thinking about a good digital camera. Don't want to spend lots of cash (want some left for mods) but want a faster shooting digital camera that will allow a little more creativity than the present ones we have. Any suggestions or experiences?
 

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From what I've read, you cannot go wrong with the Canon or Nikon digital SLR cameras. I've been debating it as well so I can use various lenses.
 

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I have both the Canon Rebel and Nikon D200. The Canon feels a little small in my hands. The Nikon is solid (and a wee bit heavy). I will be upgrading to the Nikon D300, as soon as my budget allows. The switch from film to digital has been fun and with incredible results. I highly recommend the digital SLR format. B&H Photo in NYC has great deals and the sales staff are very informative and helpful, once you get past the accent (I'm certain they say the same about mine).Look at the Nikon kit with the 18-200 lens, it is a great combination with either the D200 or D300.
 

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I've got to chime in on this one too!!!

Lets start with the point and shoot options... If you want a small point and shoot that doesn't draw attention, but allows you to be just as creative as with an SLR... I suggest either the Leica/ Panasonic twins... specifically the Leica D-Lux3 or Panasonic LX-2 or the Canon G9. These cameras are small, but they can the fully manual settings that you would find on an SLR. But they have small image sensors so if you keep your ISO speeds down to less than 400, you can get SLR like results. What I like most about these cameras are the retro looks they have & the portability. I have the Leica D-Lux3 and it's been great.

You can also step it up to an SLR... bigger image sensor means less noise when you step up the ISO speeds. Nikon, Canon, Olympus, Pentax are all really nice SLR's.

I just recently got an Olympus E-510 (they just released the E-520). Since the image sensor is a little smaller than the other SLR's (it uses the 4/3rds format) but much larger than a P&S camera it allows for very little noise at higher ISO settings, but allows for a compact lens/ camera system since you don't need a big lens on it. For example the kit lens on my E-510 can extend up to 150mm... but it's equivalent to 300mm on a Canon or Nikon with a lens that's 1/2 the size. Add in built in image stabilization means you don't have to factor the cost of IS into extra lenses + it has live view.

My E-510 costed me roughly $650 with two lenses in comparison the new Canon XSI costs $899 with only one lens which is optically stabilized.

If you want something even smaller... the new Olympus E-420 is the smallest DSLR that you can get... same features as the E-510 but no built in image stabilzation.

On the other hand you can get a Canon and use your older lenses with it too.

You can also look at Digital Camera Reviews and News: Digital Photography Review: Forums, Glossary, FAQ for other advice and suggestions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses. Since I already have a couple EOS lenses (nothing special about them at this point) I'm interested in the Canon XTi and XSi. Does anyone have any experience (good or bad) with them? Can these older lenses be used or will there be problems preventing them from fully functioning?
 

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Your Canon lens "should" work but, depending on their age, some of the functions might not work. I use Canon lenses and digital bodies and had some early Nikon digital cameras.

If you are thinking of going to digital SLR's, the Canons are great. So are the Nikons but they won't work with your existing lenses for sure. I started with the first "Digital Rebel" and have progressed to the 30D. Remember that high megapixels don't necessarily make better pictures.

I agree the NY on-line retailers are very competitive. Also look at Abe's of Maine, I have found a couple great deals from them from time to time.

I would also recommend looking at Steve's Digicams - Main Menu and Digital Camera Reviews and News: Digital Photography Review: Forums, Glossary, FAQ for reviews of most cameras with direct comparisons of each model. Give it a look and see if the feedback you are getting is similar to what these sites say. Good luck...
 

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Unless you are a professional or really plan to get your pictures blown up to poster size, most of today's cameras are overkill. Anything over 6 or 7 is more than you really need for small format shots. I have many excellent, detailed shots of the western landscapes with a 4 mp Canon Elph. I haven't looked lately but it 10 may be about the minimum in the Canon and Nikon SLRs.
 

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My brother has the Canon Rebel Xti and loves it, 10 megapixel. The Xsi is the newer model with 12 megapixel. The Xti is real inexpensive right now ($570.00) as it has been replaced. You can get good quality 16"x20" prints from it. Your EOS lenses should work with with camera as this is an EOS camera.

B&H Photo is a great, reputable online place to buy from:

Canon | EOS Digital Rebel XTi Digital Camera Body | 1239B002
 

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EOS lenses may fit new camera and you may loose some of the automatic features. I have used lenses older than that with newer cameras, the lenses work and you can meter through them, but the settings are all manual. It all depends upon the mount, make sure that they are the same. These days much of the creative parts of digital photography seems to be manipulating the photos on a computer. Less camera may be all that is needed. Though the trend is going the other way: toward DSLR cameras. Olympus E-420 seems to be the latest/greatest camera.
 

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In the 80’s Nikon was the best. Canon had a firm lock on second place and all the other SLR’s (Single Lens Reflex) camera’s followed. Were not talking about Medium format SLR cameras here. The medium format SLR cameras are a whole different animal. With the digital revolution came new Ideas and technology. The choices are many. There are several questions you must answer before deciding which camera is best for the type of pictures you want to take.

How much effort are you willing to put into photography? If your not willing to put forth the effort to learn how to use manual settings then stay away from SLR cameras. You can use and SLR in program (automatic) mode, but why spend the money for something you won’t use? What makes SLR camera’s so good for photography? The ability to control shutter speed, Aperture, and change lenes. To this point we have only talked about the SLR camera body. But without a lens the camera body is useless.

The lens you choose can make or brake any photograph! But the caveat here is that a good lens will cost many hundreds if not thousands of dollars! You can buy cheap lenses, but chromatic aberration and distortion as well as image clarity will degrade the photograph. The lens is an integral part of the camera. When you buy and SLR camera, you are buying into a "system". The camera and lens work together, they are equal in importance. The type of lens you buy will be dictated by what you photograph. Canon publishes a book called "EF lens work III". It’s a good starting point for determining what lens to buy. The SLR camera system is not for everyone. It requires a substantial investment in time and money to reap the rewards of a SLR camera. There is an alternative however, it’s the point and shoot camera (P&S)!

You can’t change lens with a P&S and manual settings are few or nonexistent. What makes P&S cameras desirable is there lightweight, easy to use, and not expensive. The most expensive P&S cameras are around $700 dollars. A good P&S is between $300 to $500. These are not "bad" or "cheap" cameras. There purpose is different from and SLR but you can still get great pictures from a P&S.

I have several Canon cameras (20D, 30D, 40D) their excellent cameras. Nikon is equal to Canon in picture quality but a little more expensive. Remember that the lens you put on either brand of camera will make or brake the photograph.

All of the photographs below were shot with Canon digital cameras. They are included here so you can see what is possible with a good SLR and the right lens.

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I have a Canon, an XTi. I have the 18-55, 10-17 Tokina fisheye, and the 75-100. The glass is the most important thing, and then the body. The question of Canon vs. Nikon will go on forever, so the best thing to do is go to a camera shop and play with the cameras. Even simple things like grip will make or break the camera.

All the pictures I posted here were with my XTi.
 

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Nikon D80 for me. I have several lenses but the one I use 90% of the time is the 18-200 VR. I've really liked it and with the SB600 speedlight it's been my most used camera ever. Next will probably be the D300. Very amazing low light capabilities. So very tempting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the feedback.
 

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gosh all this fancy stuff now i feel bad i just have a HP camera it is 10.5 megapixel though and it takes excellent pictures.
 

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Take a look at the Canon G9 - great camera for the money - I will be getting one soon - I hope - :cheers:

-
 

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As stated before, it depends on what you want from your camera.

I have not used a P&S for a while but one limiting factor was the time lag from pushing the shutter button to when the photo was actually digitized. I like the instantaneous shooting on my SLR Nikon D2x.

I also like the ability to shoot frames as fast as I want, but I don't just hold the shutter button down, but I do like to catch unique action sequences. Plus shooting that way, at speed, I have a higher chance of getting that ONE special shot out of several shot.

As stated before also the quality and speed of the lens makes a huge difference, unfortunately that also means a high cost factor for the good lenses.

It is kind of like 4x4 wheeling, you can't go buy a Rav4 and fix it up to compete with an FJC. If you want to wheel, you have to bite the bullet and get the FJC even though it cost more. Same with photography. Just be sure you want to do. Because I do know several people who became overwhelmed with the controls on a new SLR, and finally quite using it.

One last thing I would say, is buy quality, brand name equipment. B&H is good!
 

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Lots of input from lots of great photographers...some pros, some hobbiests ...
Now IMHO, since you already have EOS lenses and you stated that you don't want to spend a lot, then I would stick with an entry level or mid level Canon DSLR...If you switch to the Nikon camp (and yes I am a Nikon D200 & D70IR shooter myself), then you'll need to spend the money your already spent once on lenses and buy new lenses that will fit the Nikon body. ... good luck with your purchase and show us some pics when you have your new camera.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm still on the fence between Canon and Nikon. I'm leaning more toward Canon XSi since I have had experience with Canon EOS products. I am looking forward to cutting the time lag on our point and shoot cameras.
 
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