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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know what they do, but how do they do it?

Here's a picture to use if you want to mspaint an illustration:
 

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All it is is a pulley. I'm not sure how much more clear that can be. What is it exactly you want to know?

You use them to change direction of pull or to double the line back to the vehicle in order to increase the pulling power of the winch (but it also slows the speed down to half as much as a single line pull).

HTH,
Sean
 

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Alot of women use them:rofl:sorry couldn't resist.
 

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I hate to quote myself, but I did a write up on my build-up thread.

Snatch block usage.


If you're going to take the road less traveled, a snatch block is a nice tool to have (better to have and not need than need and not have).
 

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the snatch blocks are the clear circles.
 

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The only thing different about a snatch block and a pulley block that you'd buy at a marine supply or use for industrial rigging is that the snatch block can be put on the MIDDLE of the line without having to reeve the rope in, starting it from the end.

The snatch block rotates open and allows you to wrap the middle of the wire rope or synthetic line from your winch around the pulley, and then you rotate it closed again, and attach the ends together with a shackle. You can attach the shackled snatch block to a tree or a rock or a vehicle, using chain or straps. You can use this system to control the direction of pull on the winch line or you can make the winch into a block-and-tackle, increasing it's mechanical advantage. By folding a winch line in half through a pulley, for example, as shown in the illustration in the above post, you double it's pulling force while decreasing the rate of movement in half. This is the "rope equivalent" of using a lever with a 2:1 ratio of effort arm to load arm length.
 

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The only thing different about a snatch block and a pulley block that you'd buy at a marine supply or use for industrial rigging is that the snatch block can be put on the MIDDLE of the line without having to reeve the rope in, starting it from the end.

The snatch block rotates open and allows you to wrap the middle of the wire rope or synthetic line from your winch around the pulley, and then you rotate it closed again, and attach the ends together with a shackle. You can attach the shackled snatch block to a tree or a rock or a vehicle, using chain or straps. You can use this system to control the direction of pull on the winch line or you can make the winch into a block-and-tackle, increasing it's mechanical advantage. By folding a winch line in half through a pulley, for example, as shown in the illustration in the above post, you double it's pulling force while decreasing the rate of movement in half. This is the "rope equivalent" of using a lever with a 2:1 ratio of effort arm to load arm length.
Right on.

The only thing I'd add is: practice rigging your snatchblock at home/in your driveway/at a local school parking lot when school is not in session, etc. ---> BEFORE you are in a situation off-road when things are dire and you need to rig it there.

There have been situations (not fronting anyone off on the Forum) when people were out in the bush and had some issues only to find that they'd never practiced with their recovery gear.

One more time -- Practice with it before you need to use it for real.

(There are only two kinds of people: :bigthumb: Trained and :( Untrained)
 

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:grinbiginvert:This is a good time to discuss safety lines.:D

You're out there on the trail and something happens where you need to use a winch - maybe a snatchblock too. You throw out the snatch strap around a rock a tree or whatever.

However you're also off-camber on the trail and it's muddy or there are loose rocks or whatever and your rig is also sliding down the hill sideways.:scared:

Time to throw out a safety line!

What?

You don't have one?:slant:

So you'll winch forward and the truck will slide sideways down the hill.

:boohoo:

Time to walk out and file the insurance claim when/if you make it to civilization?

________________

Do yourself a favor, bring extra line by way of a strap or maybe that steel winch cable sitting in your garage from when it was replaced by your new synthetic winch line.

Sling that out uphill and either put a couple of wraps around a tree or if you have a pull pal, you can dig it in.

"But UPHILL, there isn't anything to hook it to. No trees, I don't have a pull pal and I don't want to loose my FJ!

You have a spare tire. I hope you have a shovel. Take the spare up the hill along with your safety line and dig it in so that it's in the hole at a 90 degree angle to your rig. Fill the hole so the spare is completely buried. Tie off the safety line to the rear of your fj (maybe to the shackle in your hitch receiver -- assuming you've thought ahead and have one.)

That will anchor you while you winch yourself out of trouble. (hint) the line doesn't have to be TAUNT, it only has to be there in case your FJ starts sideways down the hill.

Yes it's a mess, yes it's a hassle but when you are in that sort of situation (and mark my words it will happen if you wheel your rig for any period of time), you just have to solve the problem. When you have tools and have practiced, and extra line, etc. you are ahead of the game.
 

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:grinbiginvert:This is a good time to discuss safety lines.:D

You're out there on the trail and something happens where you need to use a winch - maybe a snatchblock too. You throw out the snatch strap around a rock a tree or whatever.

However you're also off-camber on the trail and it's muddy or there are loose rocks or whatever and your rig is also sliding down the hill sideways

Yes it's a mess, yes it's a hassle but when you are in that sort of situation (and mark my words it will happen if you wheel your rig for any period of time), you just have to solve the problem. When you have tools and have practiced, and extra line, etc. you are ahead of the game.
Larry,
Always good to hear from the voice of reason and experience!!

Especially the : "better to have and not need than need and not have".
Like the boy scouts - always be prepared.
 

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Holy Crap, I never had a clue what a snatch block was! To me, that's a swing-side pulley we use in rescue training, when building mechanical advantage in the form of a Z-rig or block & tackle system. Totally the same concept. I've been enlightened!:clap:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The snatch block rotates open and allows you to wrap the middle of the wire rope or synthetic line from your winch around the pulley, and then you rotate it closed again, and attach the ends together with a shackle. You can attach the shackled snatch block to a tree or a rock or a vehicle, using chain or straps. You can use this system to control the direction of pull on the winch line or you can make the winch into a block-and-tackle, increasing it's mechanical advantage. By folding a winch line in half through a pulley, for example, as shown in the illustration in the above post, you double it's pulling force while decreasing the rate of movement in half. This is the "rope equivalent" of using a lever with a 2:1 ratio of effort arm to load arm length.

Thank, this is what I didn't understand. I didn't know there was a pulley in between the 2 pieces of metal.
 

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The snatch block rotates open and allows you to wrap the middle of the wire rope or synthetic line from your winch around the pulley, and then you rotate it closed again, and attach the ends together with a shackle. You can attach the shackled snatch block to a tree or a rock or a vehicle, using chain or straps. You can use this system to control the direction of pull on the winch line or you can make the winch into a block-and-tackle, increasing it's mechanical advantage. By folding a winch line in half through a pulley, for example, as shown in the illustration in the above post, you double it's pulling force while decreasing the rate of movement in half. This is the "rope equivalent" of using a lever with a 2:1 ratio of effort arm to load arm length.
Right on.

The only thing I'd add is: practice rigging your snatchblock at home/in your driveway/at a local school parking lot when school is not in session, etc. ---> BEFORE you are in a situation off-road when things are dire and you need to rig it there.

There have been situations (not fronting anyone off on the Forum) when people were out in the bush and had some issues only to find that they'd never practiced with their recovery gear.

One more time -- Practice with it before you need to use it for real.

(There are only two kinds of people: :bigthumb: Trained and :( Untrained)
Jon and Larry, both great posts. If you never need a snatch block, I'd say you were beyond lucky. And/or maybe wheeling beneath your abilities! :)

Getting your hands dirty in a parking lot rather than on the trail when your adrenaline is cursing through your veins (and possibly hampering your thinking) is always a smart way to practice. When you're under pressure or your FJ is sitting precariously, you should know what to do.

Pull out that winch line, set up a snatch block to a line attached to a tree or another vehicle, and get comfortable with how it feels to spool in the winch line under load.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
:grinbiginvert:This is a good time to discuss safety lines.:D

You're out there on the trail and something happens where you need to use a winch - maybe a snatchblock too. You throw out the snatch strap around a rock a tree or whatever.

However you're also off-camber on the trail and it's muddy or there are loose rocks or whatever and your rig is also sliding down the hill sideways.:scared:

Time to throw out a safety line!

What?

You don't have one?:slant:

So you'll winch forward and the truck will slide sideways down the hill.

:boohoo:

Time to walk out and file the insurance claim when/if you make it to civilization?

________________

Do yourself a favor, bring extra line by way of a strap or maybe that steel winch cable sitting in your garage from when it was replaced by your new synthetic winch line.

Sling that out uphill and either put a couple of wraps around a tree or if you have a pull pal, you can dig it in.

"But UPHILL, there isn't anything to hook it to. No trees, I don't have a pull pal and I don't want to loose my FJ!

You have a spare tire. I hope you have a shovel. Take the spare up the hill along with your safety line and dig it in so that it's in the hole at a 90 degree angle to your rig. Fill the hole so the spare is completely buried. Tie off the safety line to the rear of your fj (maybe to the shackle in your hitch receiver -- assuming you've thought ahead and have one.)

That will anchor you while you winch yourself out of trouble. (hint) the line doesn't have to be TAUNT, it only has to be there in case your FJ starts sideways down the hill.

Yes it's a mess, yes it's a hassle but when you are in that sort of situation (and mark my words it will happen if you wheel your rig for any period of time), you just have to solve the problem. When you have tools and have practiced, and extra line, etc. you are ahead of the game.

You mean like if there is a hill on the right you will slide down into, safety line the opposite side of the vehicle? Am I understanding this.

Wheeling is pretty new to me. Thanks for being patient.
 

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You mean like if there is a hill on the right you will slide down into, safety line the opposite side of the vehicle? Am I understanding this.

Wheeling is pretty new to me. Thanks for being patient.
Yes, pretty much. But he was referring to the vehicle being part-way down said hill! :) The safety line keeps the truck from further sliding down. That's a fairly scary place to be!

Don't be afraid to ask real questions! There's no other way to learn! We were all new to this at some point!
Even the venerable Bill Burke starts his clinics by saying, "I don't know everything." :)

M
 

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You mean like if there is a hill on the right you will slide down into, safety line the opposite side of the vehicle? Am I understanding this.

Wheeling is pretty new to me. Thanks for being patient.
Something like this.



The "safety" line



Rescue Teaser
 

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Tony, as usual, a picture is worth a thousand words! :D
 

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Tony, as usual, a picture is worth a thousand words! :D
Thanks. I'm not sure if the owner of the vehicle was happy about me snapping pics at a time like that though. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·

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Thanks. That helped explain it.
No, that's not what I was talking about. The safety line should be fastened on the uphill slope or in the case of Tony's photo, maybe up on the high side of the road. You want the safety strap anchored higher than your rig so it will tend to support your FJ and keep it from falling into the abyss.

Fastening the strap behind is ok to pull the FJ out, but there is nothing to keep it from falling over the side.

Maybe we should do a very short mini-class on this in conjunction with the winching class at the Summit. We can ask the person putting on the demonstration to cover this as well.
 

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Larry, the link that I've provided (Rescue Teaser) detailed the process. We did indeed increase the angle of the "safety" line by having the rear vehicle as close to the mountain as possible. The picture just didn't show the process.
 
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