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Discussion Starter #1
I know a lot of people use a CB Radio but I am having a hard time justifying purchasing/installing one for the Summit. I have never needed one and have always been able to get away with 2-way radios. I s a CB necessary or will 2- way radios work just fine?
 

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I only had the GMRS last year at the summit. It was not a problem - they just stuck me in the middle of the group. If I remember right one group I was in only had two CBs total. They were the leader and tail gunner. That's all that was needed.
 

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You'll be able to participate in a lot more banter during the boring parts with a CB.

You could always look into a handheld
 

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CBs are fare more prevalent than 2 way radios are out there on the trails. You will be better informed about what obsticles lie ahead etc if you are in touch with the rigs in your group.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You'll be able to participate in a lot more banter during the boring parts with a CB.

You could always look into a handheld
From what I understand, handhelds suck. Is there a good handheld that will give as much range as a good two way radio?
 

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CBs are also good for contacting the ranger station lets say for some reason you are stuck alone somewhere. You can also put a flag on your CB antenna depending on what type it is so that when you are in a more open off roading area, people can see you better on other sides of the hills.
 

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You could easily get a cheap CB setup for under a $100 if you go with a cobra and a little antenna. They are probably #1 on my mod list for offroad. Besides the obvious colorful banter benefit, I almost consider the lack of a CB dangerous offroad. On many runs where we had folks without CB's, they had a much harder time nagigating and keeping safe (not at Ouray). With CB you can hear when obstacles lie ahead, when other trucks are coming the other way, when you need to brake suddenly, amongst others.

Get a CB, it will be a great investment. Go here to buy online: Walcott CB - CB Radios & Amateur Radios Superstore & Repair -
 

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only folks that speak reasonably intelligent should get HAMs :)

but to answer the OP, it is certainly not required, i didnt have anything the first year, this year i will have HAM and FRS (your two way)
 

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Why is it CB vs. 2-way radios (CBs are 2-way radios by the way). Just like carrying an air jack and a Hi-Lift, is is a good idea to have more than one type of communication method. While CBs are the most popular, Ham radios has much better range and clarity, and GMRS / FRS radios fall somewhere in the middle. Most government agencies now monitor 2 meter ham frequencies as well as CB channels. And while getting a license doesn't preclude someone from being an idiot, those who have worked for their "ticket" generally have more respect for the amateur radio hobby and those in it, using radio communications in a proper manner.

With the price of amateur radio equipment becoming much more affordable, I think it is a good idea for anyone involved in an outdoor hobby to consider getting their ham radio license, in addition to having a CB and FRS / GMRS on board...
 

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There is lots of amusing and interesting conversation on the trails to be missed. I can't stand the CB on the highway, with the sophomoric banter going on all the time. But the CB is great on the trail. A handheld works fine in a group when range is not a problem.

I have a Cobra 75WXST Weatherband CB Radio works great for me..
 

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But the CB is great on the trail. A handheld works fine in a group when range is not a problem.
X2. As primitive (and poor quality) as the CB radio is compared to HAM, GMRS/FRS, etc., the biggest regret so many of Summit attendees had last year was not having a CB radio to hear what was going on during the trail runs.

(Us with multiple 2-way radio formats were only able to do so much "translating" and relaying of messages for everyone else.)

Unfortunately, it still is the official communications device of off-roaders. So, ya gotta go with the masses.
 

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Did anyone realize you are supposed to get a license for the GMRS radios?

FCC: Wireless Services: General Mobile Radio Service: GMRS Home

So if you stay on just the FRS stations, channels 8-14, then you are OK.

If you want to comm on channels 1-7 or 15-22 then you are supposed to have an $85 / 5 year license.

FWIW - I paid the $85 and got mine since I plan on a HAM / Amateur license soon anyway.
 

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Yay! I’m resurrecting a dead thread!

I’m going on my 1st REAL offroading (and it still isn’t “real”) trip with my works 4x4 club. They will have a mix of CBs, Ham, and 2-ways.

Anyway – I have none of the above. I’m looking at the Motorola MS350R:

Cabela's: Motorola MS350R Radio Pack

35 mile range (yeah, right), and waterproof.

Anyway – I don’t offroad in groups often, and when I do it will probably be with these guys. Is there any advantage to a CB? Can I communicate with a CB through my Motorola?

BTW – they are all Jeepers, but still cool... :lol:
 

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I have a CB but prefer my ICOM Ham radio and because I have worked in communications all my life I will have a handheld FRS/GMRS/GPS in the truck as well.
I will be monitoring CH-7 on CB and 146.52Mhz on my Ham radio. If there is anyone who needs a relay on FRS/GMRS during a run, I will be happy to coordinate that and provide the relay.
Brian
 

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I carry both a CB and 2 FRS radio's the CB for the trail and FRS for hikes or trail if everyone has one.... no static
 
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