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Hello All!

I'm a new FJ owner (new to me, just got a 2008!) and a first-time 4x4 off-road driver. For the last 4 days straight I drove around the Kofa Mountains (I'm a landscape photographer and looking for locations). I went further and further into areas that seemed "dangerous" to me (deep sand, over huge rocks, over smaller sharp rocks, holes, etc...). Every day I tackled something a little more extreme and I was amazed that I never popped a tire. My luck came to an end yesterday and I got my first flat. Fortunately it happened on the freeway after I had exited the mountain range.

I had trouble using the bottle jack on the freeway and realized I would have truly been screwed had I popped the tire out on the non-level, alternating hard and soft surface of the terrain out there. (Not to mention the 108 degree heat of the mountains and the fact that in 4 solid days of driving I did not see a single human being...)

So this afternoon I spent a very unsuccessful 2 hours trying to figure out what kind of jack I should carry with me in case I pop a tire in an offroad setting. The easiest solution (even if its pricier) would be best for me. Thanks for any advice you can offer!

:smile
 

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one of these:



I recently bought one from Tractor supply. I also have a 4" high solid base for loose soil/sand, so in your instance if you are not lifted, carry a 12x12 piece of 1/2 or 3/4 plywood...
 

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Thankfully I have not had to change a tire in years either on-road or off-road but I'm always prepared. I have a Hi-lift jack, rock rail adapter, wheel adapter, tire repair kit, and off course a very good compressor. Before and after each trail run I check out the vehicle to ensure everything is in order. I also do a walk around my truck at the beginning and end of each day even while not hitting the trails. Some think it is overkill but again there is a reason why I haven't had to change a tire in years.

I have tested and practiced for various situations but the one that bothers me the most is off-camber situations especially since I have a high COG with my RTT. Each situation is unique and the best thing you can do, depending on your situation, is to stop and assess. Taking a breather and not letting adrenaline guide your judgements is the best thing to do.

If in an off-camber situation the best thing you can do is to try to get to a level area if possible. If the tire is still holding air you can use your compressor to air up and move to a safer location. If it is not holding air you can try to repair the tire using plugs. Unfortunately this is limited as plugs are only effective in the center of the tread and no closer than one inch from the edge of the tread. The reason is sidewall flex will keep the plug from holding. The last resort is to use your Hi-Lift to jack the vehicle up and change it out. There are several videos online on how to do this but it is dangerous and the risk we all take while off-roading.

Keep in mind that a Hi-Lift jack is only effective on metal bumpers with areas to hold the jaw or on rock rails. If you don't have either of those then you may need to look for a floor jack or larger bottle jack to handle the situation. You can also use something like the X-Jack which uses exhaust gases or your compressor to lift the vehicle. The X-Jack is like airbags used for lifting houses or during extrication by SAR units.

Hopefully this will guide you a little on changing out a tire on the trail.
 

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Lots use a hilift jack in conjunction with the hilift base which stabilizes it.
This is assuming you have a place to lift the FJ with it of course (steel bumper, hitch with d shackle and receiver, straps to attach to rims, etc)

That's what I use.
I can lift with the following :
Front bumper
Either slider (with attachment)
Rear hitch with d shackle (dangerous) I'll get a rear bumper next year.

I just got the hilift base. The last time I was in a pickle (broke front axle) a friend lent me his base, wow what a difference!
 

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If you have a hi-lift, these aren't mandatory but sure make life easier.

I can't remember if the forum was still publicly shaming Wabfab or not. Either way, getting the adapter and wabbit foot are cheap piece of mind.
 

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I always carry a Hi-Lift jack. I have the all steel model. It's pretty much THE jack to carry if you go offroad. Not too expensive either. Although there are lots of optional accessories that can run up the cost. A must is finding a way to mount the jack safely so it doesn't become a missile in an accident. I use mounts made by Demello offroad to mount the jack to my roof rack. Solid as a rock. Although while I'm driving on pavement, I'll keep the jack on the back seat floor. It's to prevent rust from rain more than anything else. The stock jacking points won't work so you will need rock sliders or aftermarket bumpers with a jacking points. Like any jack, misuse is dangerous so you should always be careful when using a Hi-Lift. There are instructional videos on youtube that are very helpful.

Hi-Lift company web site:
Hi-Lift Jack Company - Highest quality equipment at a reasonable price
How to use the High-Lift jack video:
 

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I bought a jack/stand just like the one in the picture and from the same store. Worked great when I first tried it. Carried it for about a year then took it on a trip out to the desert. When I had a flat tire 50 miles from the nearest paved road, the jack/stand failed miserably. Gushed out oil instead of lifting my car. It was my bad for not checking my equipment before going to a remote place. But I would never buy another one.
 

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Trdparts4u.toyotaofdallas.com has the rock rail adapters.
 

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Hi lift off road base(~$40) also works as a boost base for your stock bottle jack. Between the bottle jack, the hi lift with ORB and lift adapters you should be able to tackle it... But make sure you have practice with the hi lift and that it is well maintained.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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I've used the stock bottle jack with a couple of pieces of 2"x6" about 1ft long for a base on my FJ, well really all of my Toyota trucks, on and off road. The FJ was lifted the most of the 3. Did you screw out the end of the jack? A lot of people don't realize that the end of the shaft on the jack screws out several inches. If needed I've also used a piece of wood on the top of too.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I don`t see where he says his Rig is stock or modded...
It's a stock 2008, so if I use the Hi-Lift, it looks like I'll have to mod the vehicle to have a place for it to hook into. Maybe in the longrun I could do that. But I'm in Vegas now and hoping to find a jack I can buy somewhere so I can get back on the road!
 

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I've used the stock bottle jack with a couple of pieces of 2"x6" about 1ft long for a base on my FJ, well really all of my Toyota trucks, on and off road. The FJ was lifted the most of the 3. Did you screw out the end of the jack? A lot of people don't realize that the end of the shaft on the jack screws out several inches. If needed I've also used a piece of wood on the top of too.
Hi, when I tried to use the bottle jack, I couldn't even find where to slot it under the axle. The FJ manual had 3 different illustrations and all looked different. When I got under the vehicle in the dark, I couldn't see a place hole / place for it to go!
 

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It's a stock 2008, so if I use the Hi-Lift, it looks like I'll have to mod the vehicle to have a place for it to hook into. Maybe in the longrun I could do that. But I'm in Vegas now and hoping to find a jack I can buy somewhere so I can get back on the road!
yes, you would need to have an aftermarket bumper that accepts the high lift junk as you would also need a good set of sliders and the adapter as well to use the high junk.

so while you are stock sort thru what you need and what works for you, doesn`t hurt to carry, blocks, 12x12 plywood whatever makess it easier for you to use the jack in soft soil...

On beaches you are required to have a means to change a tire or unstuck yourself before calling in the big boy wreckers.

Good luck!:bigthumb:

Power built 3 ton all in one> http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/store/powerbuiltreg;-3-ton-jack-amp;-jack-stand


as mentioned just make sure periodically the jack works... any one of them can fail at any time regardless of brand or price...
 

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Wanderlust
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Hello All!

I'm a new FJ owner (new to me, just got a 2008!) and a first-time 4x4 off-road driver. For the last 4 days straight I drove around the Kofa Mountains (I'm a landscape photographer and looking for locations). I went further and further into areas that seemed "dangerous" to me (deep sand, over huge rocks, over smaller sharp rocks, holes, etc...). Every day I tackled something a little more extreme and I was amazed that I never popped a tire. My luck came to an end yesterday and I got my first flat. Fortunately it happened on the freeway after I had exited the mountain range.

I had trouble using the bottle jack on the freeway and realized I would have truly been screwed had I popped the tire out on the non-level, alternating hard and soft surface of the terrain out there. (Not to mention the 108 degree heat of the mountains and the fact that in 4 solid days of driving I did not see a single human being...)

So this afternoon I spent a very unsuccessful 2 hours trying to figure out what kind of jack I should carry with me in case I pop a tire in an offroad setting. The easiest solution (even if its pricier) would be best for me. Thanks for any advice you can offer!

:smile
Welcome! I've spent time out in the Kofa Mtns and somewhat familiar with the terrain there. There are a few abandoned mines there so exercise caution so you won't drive into one. :smile You haven't mentioned what tires your 2008 FJC came with; I suspect it may have passenger tires. Going to offroad tires will help reduce the chance of punctures and flats plus you can air down a little for more comfort offroading (20 to 25 psi). The OE bottle jack is fine for tire change but I also carry a Bushranger X-Jack. The X-Jack is more expensive but much safer than a Hi Lift. You also do not need to add aftermarket bumpers or sliders to use an X-Jack. I carry a few tarps in case I need to use the X-Jack on rocky soils to minimize the chance of puncturing the X-Jack.





The X-Jack can be purchased with a discount from some of our supporting vendors such as Wilson/Toyota of Dallas. I also carry a tire repair kit and an air compressor (I like ARB but Viair is also good). Sometimes it's easier to plug and air up versus doing a tire change. HTH

Edit: Found my old thread on Castle Dome Mines. Enjoy.
 

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Hi, when I tried to use the bottle jack, I couldn't even find where to slot it under the axle. The FJ manual had 3 different illustrations and all looked different. When I got under the vehicle in the dark, I couldn't see a place hole / place for it to go!
There's no "hole" for it to go... just put it under the axle or if it's at the back put it under the differential (my preferred place).

As stated previously, the stock jack should be just fine under normal circumstances (on road).

:cheers:
 

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Xjack airbag is good,
Hilift with offroad base & liftmate attachment allows you to lift by the wheel. Use the bottle jack with a 12" square plywood base to hold the car once lifted with the hilift to change the tyre.
 

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one of these:



I recently bought one from Tractor supply. I also have a 4" high solid base for loose soil/sand, so in your instance if you are not lifted, carry a 12x12 piece of 1/2 or 3/4 plywood...
I carry one of these too. Worked great a couple times I have used it on trails.

Was less than $50 at Pep Boys. Powerbuilt Unijack 6000
 
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