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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #1
OK, here is a draft emergency equipment checklist. Chime in and hopefully we can make it a sticky. This list is assuming that all of the listed equipment is preped to deploy. The last thing you need in an emergency situation is an equipment-themed Easter egg hunt!


Deployment Kit

Level 1 - Daily Personal Inventory
Level 2 - Extended Personal Inventory
Level 3 - Daily Vehicle Inventory
Level 4 - Extended Vehicle Inventory
Level 5 - BUG OUT!

Each level contains the gear listed above it. Example: Level 3 has all of the gear listed in Levels 1 & 2.

Level 1 (On Person)
Knife and/or Multi-Tool
Wallet
Keys
Sturdy Belt

Level 2 (In Cary Bag)
Personal Medication for 1 Day
Flashlight
Eyeglasses or Safety Glasses
Log Book and Pens
Water Bottle
Bandanas
Lightweight Goves
Exam Gloves
Hand Sanitizer
Phone Charger
Altoids
Snacks
Government ID Card

Level 3
ARES/RACES Door Decals
Vehicle First Aid Kit
Rope/Twine
Water
Dog Food
MREs
Toiletries
Flash Lights
Zip Lock Bags
Trash Bags
HD Gloves
Ham/CB/FRS Radio(s)
Camp Towels
Eating Utensils
Chemical Ice Packs
Extra Batteries
Maps
Go Kit
Boots
Personal FIrst Aid Kit
Hardhat
Socks
Reflective Vest (CERT)
CERT Multi-Tool
Survival Knife
Exam Gloves
Work Gloves
Camelback
Sunscreen
Mosquito Repellent

Level 4
Hi-Lift
Shovel/Axe
Large First Aid Kit
Water Filtration System
Weapons/Ammo
Water Containers
Mess Kit
Handheld Radio w/ Extra Battery and/or Charger
Blankets
Awning w/ Sides
Multi-Purpose Soap
Rope Tensioners
Tie Down Straps
Fuel Cans (Full)
Water Canisters (Full)

Level 5
Utility Trailer
Generator
Table
Folding Chairs
Cooler
Wash bucket (Oil Drain Pan)
Stove
Stove Fuel
Cookware
Table Cover
Roof Box(es)
 

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Catalyst
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Is this checklist of levels (Kramer: It's all about the levels) your idea, or did you get it from somewhere else? I'm just trying to figure out if this is a distilation of all of the other 'checklist' threads in this section (again), or if it's really something new and helpful that we could put to work here.
 

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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I like to think I came up with it. Problem is with escalation. People get overwhelmed with one gigantic list and there are different levels of preparedness that people are comfortable with. None of my CERT/FEMA/ARES-RACES training had preparedness levels. They just addressed the 'kit' as a whole. This may be better fed back up through the aforementioned orgs.

Good point on getting information from previous posts. I'll dig around and see if I can add anything from them.
 

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Premium Member
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I think its a great starting point for anyone to design their kit after. Of course not everyone will have a generator or fema training but to me having some of these classes as well I see exactly why you go where your going here.
I dont have all the items youve listed but I like to think Im prepared for my area.I keep a BOB in the FJ my EDC backpack goes with me if im away from the FJ or home in the 4runner or at work. My home supplies are seperate marked organized and expiration dates kept track of. When I started my prepping I took a lot from a guy on youtube ex special forces medic channel name is AnalyticalSurvival. I will post up a link.
I like this I think if you help one person get ready that wouldnt have been youve done good! I will go through FJ in morning get a good list of my kit post it up see what you think.
 

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I Have a V-8!! Moderator
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A general list for people to at least look at and get started from, then they can modify it as they need for their areas and conditions. I.E. I don't have kids so I don't need to plan for them like others with kids would. Weather: Here in WY the weather can be brutal compared to other places as we can get really cold temperatures and high winds. Throw in some snow and it can kill easily in many ways. Gear: Say a chainsaw. Wouldn't do me a bit of good in my immediate area. Someone in say Oregon would probably consider it high priority because of fallen trees in a storm or fuel for the house/cooking etc.
 

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Catalyst
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I like to think I came up with it. Problem is with escalation. People get overwhelmed with one gigantic list and there are different levels of preparedness that people are comfortable with. None of my CERT/FEMA/ARES-RACES training had preparedness levels. They just addressed the 'kit' as a whole. This may be better fed back up through the aforementioned orgs.

Good point on getting information from previous posts. I'll dig around and see if I can add anything from them.
I definitely like the idea of the levels for the purpose of progressively working toward a goal. It helps those of us who are less prepared, and who have very little resources to work with, but have a desire to be more prepared.

We can work on just the essentials for the minimalistic type of event first, and once we have something pretty well established for that 'level', we can begin to branch out and work on more serious and complex and extended scenarios.

Perhaps one aspect of the 'levels' should be some sort of sense of how long the preparation is for, and/or what the nature of the 'event' is.

...My home supplies are seperate marked organized and expiration dates kept track of...
This is a VERY valuable concept, especially for those more shoter-term types of 'events'. I've thought about this a lot, but haven't actually landed on any solid system yet. Some of my friends have quite the inventory of goods, and I know they all keep track of dates, etc to some degree, but I'm not sure if they have a consistent system or what.

So, what sort of system do you use for this?

This video is called preparedness or paranoia sums it up for me. this will also lead you where you can check out his other vids.

Preparedness or Paranoia? - YouTube
Very good, simple message. I just had my wife sit and watch it together with me, and it's exactly the thing needed to help those that aren't quite as turned on to the idea of prepping get a little spark. It's an intellectual solution tot he emotional baggage that has been packaged up with 'prepping' generally in our society.

Thanks for sharing.

A general list for people to at least look at and get started from, then they can modify it as they need for their areas and conditions. I.E. I don't have kids so I don't need to plan for them like others with kids would. Weather: Here in WY the weather can be brutal compared to other places as we can get really cold temperatures and high winds. Throw in some snow and it can kill easily in many ways. Gear: Say a chainsaw. Wouldn't do me a bit of good in my immediate area. Someone in say Oregon would probably consider it high priority because of fallen trees in a storm or fuel for the house/cooking etc.
Good point. No kids here either, but perhaps a chainsaw would be a bit more relevant for us since we do actually have some of those things they call trees around these parts. Very good point. Prepping for your geographical area...
 

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Premium Member
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Quote OCR14A: I just had my wife sit and watch it together with me, and it's exactly the thing needed to help those that aren't quite as turned on to the idea of prepping get a little spark. It's an intellectual solution tot he emotional baggage that has been packaged up with 'prepping' generally in our society.

Thanks for sharing.


Im glad you like it. Thats what I love about his videos very no bs approach to survival of you and your love ones. On the storage for home. I bought a stackable metal rack/bench from lowes. I try to keep a months supply of food for my family. Some rice,noodles,mre's,mountain house meals,water,snacks. On the food items I just put a notebook right with it when I put something new in I label it and write it in the notebook.Now this is not to mention whats in your house that you keep around for daily or weekly meals. I think when people look at whats in there home they would be suprised how long it could be rationed out. Just like water people forget that they have either a 40 gallon or 55 gallon clean storage tank of water usually right in the pantry hot water tank. Just needs shut off so its not wasted if the water stops. Plus I will admit I just enjoy doing it.
 

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Catalyst
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...Im glad you like it. Thats what I love about his videos very no bs approach to survival of you and your love ones. On the storage for home. I bought a stackable metal rack/bench from lowes. I try to keep a months supply of food for my family. Some rice,noodles,mre's,mountain house meals,water,snacks. On the food items I just put a notebook right with it when I put something new in I label it and write it in the notebook.Now this is not to mention whats in your house that you keep around for daily or weekly meals. I think when people look at whats in there home they would be suprised how long it could be rationed out. Just like water people forget that they have either a 40 gallon or 55 gallon clean storage tank of water usually right in the pantry hot water tank. Just needs shut off so its not wasted if the water stops. Plus I will admit I just enjoy doing it.
Ya, more-so what I meant was your system for this...

...expiration dates kept track of.
So, you just write them in the notebook. How do you maintain the store? Do you just kick stuff out when you notice that it's expired, or do you have a schedule for checking things individually, or as a whole, or what?

Some of my friends that keep a lot of stuff in their prepper warehouse simply use it as an extension of their pantry. When they need something in the pantry or cupboards in the kitchen, they take it from the warehouse, and then when they go shopping, they replenish the warehouse, not the kitchen directly.

This isn't their only mechanism for rotating the expired stuff out, of course, but it works pretty well, and makes better use of stuff than simply holding onto it until it gets old and has to be tossed.
 

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Premium Member
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Ya, more-so what I meant was your system for this...



So, you just write them in the notebook. How do you maintain the store? Do you just kick stuff out when you notice that it's expired, or do you have a schedule for checking things individually, or as a whole, or what?

Some of my friends that keep a lot of stuff in their prepper warehouse simply use it as an extension of their pantry. When they need something in the pantry or cupboards in the kitchen, they take it from the warehouse, and then when they go shopping, they replenish the warehouse, not the kitchen directly.

This isn't their only mechanism for rotating the expired stuff out, of course, but it works pretty well, and makes better use of stuff than simply holding onto it until it gets old and has to be tossed.
I check it usually at least once a month. Almost all of my stuff expires in years not months. I just take the food thats closing in on expiring to the station and the guys will eat it up! the wife wont :lol:What I do I stole from the video I posted second.Say I put in a case of MRE's I will number it with a sharpie on the box write its number and contents in the note book and its expiration date.That way at a quick glance at the notebook you know weither to rotate something out and replace it.
 

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Catalyst
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What if the number of items being 'tracked' fills a few pages of the notebook (which some of my friends' clearly do). It seems like it could get unruly after a while.

What would "a quick glance at the notebook" look like in this kind of scenario?
 

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I Have a V-8!! Moderator
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Ya, more-so what I meant was your system for this...



So, you just write them in the notebook. How do you maintain the store? Do you just kick stuff out when you notice that it's expired, or do you have a schedule for checking things individually, or as a whole, or what?

Some of my friends that keep a lot of stuff in their prepper warehouse simply use it as an extension of their pantry. When they need something in the pantry or cupboards in the kitchen, they take it from the warehouse, and then when they go shopping, they replenish the warehouse, not the kitchen directly.

This isn't their only mechanism for rotating the expired stuff out, of course, but it works pretty well, and makes better use of stuff than simply holding onto it until it gets old and has to be tossed.

This is what a lot of people do and recommend. Store stuff and use it with everyday meals and replace as used just like normal pantry stuff. It keeps the stuff rotated and fresh, and it helps make sure your body can handle some of the different foods and not cause you problems. You could have 5 years of food stored with a mix of dehydrated, freeze dried, MREs, etc. but if eating a couple of meals from this food causes you to be bound up for days or just the opposite and purging constantly in one way or another it isn't going to do you any good.

It also gives you a chance to find out what stuff you do or don't like. You may find something that you wouldn't feed to the neighbors dog because it tastes nasty. Would you rather find this out now with one can of it, or a few months or years down the road when you have 10 cases and things are bad?

There are also several ways that you can build up a food storage and several types of food too.

You can go out and buy the big 1 year supplies of freeze dried foods or MREs if you have the money, but they are expensive, limited in serving size, and like I mentioned above, your body may not like a steady diet of them right away or if at all. The biggest advantage of these types of food are that they are ready to eat with just hot water or in the case of MREs, just open the pouch. They are basically the fast food of food storage.

Another way to build storage is with bulk items. This is a great way if you like to cook and make things from scratch. Bulk buckets of grain that you grind to make your own flour. Buckets of beans, rice, pasta, etc. Protein would come from beans but also small amounts of dehydrated, canned, freeze dried, or froze (while there is power) meats. Dehydrated stuff like butter, milk, cheese, etc. will be added to the buckets too. This type of stuff is great, but can be labor intensive as you are doing a lot of work grinding stuff or whatever before you even get to making something for dinner. Basically this is the way things were done before convenience foods that were packaged.

Buying a little more of what you normally would is another way. When you go to the store for groceries, add an extra few cans of veggies, fruit, meat etc. Put the extras on the shelf and keep going to the store like normal. Soon these few extra cans will multiply and you will have a good start on storage. Buy from sales too to add extra for the same money. For a few dollars extra here and there it won't be as big of a financial burden. This way lets you eat the same foods you always do and all that is different is instead of buying two cans of something your are buying 3 or 4 at a time and just putting the new on the shelf and using the old.

One last way is to buy a mixture of stuff. Doing this will give you flexibility when preparing things and will let you get used to eating a variety of different types of foods so your body won't give you trouble too. You can grind your own flour and make bread or if it's been a long day, you can use a mix and just add water. Pull some meat from the freezer, some beans from the bucket, and grind up the corn into cornmeal for corn bread and have chili with it for dinner. A bad day? Open a can of chili and have some crackers. This way lets you pick up a few things as money allows. You can purchase foods that you like and not be stuck with what comes in the big plan packages. You can have a mix of fresh, frozen, canned, and others to eat one way or to mix and match.
 
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