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Within the past weeks, I have been lightly reading about the color of light and its relation to visibility, specifically yellow fog lights. I came across multiple sources that disproved the claim that yellow allows for better visibility in fog than "white" light. I've also noticed that LightForce makes many colored filters for their lights which make me wonder which colors work and which don't.


So basically, what is your experience with different colors of light?
 

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Water droplets (rain, snow, fog) reflect and refract light. Different frequencies of visible light are refracted differently (see the rainbow:bigthumb:). A colored fog light reduces light from frequencies other than that frequency giving a lower range of refraction. Reflection is a function of angle of incidence and won't change (much) regardless of color. This is the theory behind why colored lights help. The research behind why colored lights don't provide much difference is based on the same principles. What they don't go into much is that visibility is a matter of individual perception. The same conditions will be seen differently by different people. I find white light just fine, but I know people who swear by different colored lights. My feeling is go out with some different colored filters in poor visibility and see what works for you.
 

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wow....thanks for the interesting read. welcome to the forum :D

Water droplets (rain, snow, fog) reflect and refract light. Different frequencies of visible light are refracted differently (see the rainbow:bigthumb:). A colored fog light reduces light from frequencies other than that frequency giving a lower range of refraction. Reflection is a function of angle of incidence and won't change (much) regardless of color. This is the theory behind why colored lights help. The research behind why colored lights don't provide much difference is based on the same principles. What they don't go into much is that visibility is a matter of individual perception. The same conditions will be seen differently by different people. I find white light just fine, but I know people who swear by different colored lights. My feeling is go out with some different colored filters in poor visibility and see what works for you.
 

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Water droplets (rain, snow, fog) reflect and refract light. Different frequencies of visible light are refracted differently (see the rainbow:bigthumb:). A colored fog light reduces light from frequencies other than that frequency giving a lower range of refraction. Reflection is a function of angle of incidence and won't change (much) regardless of color. This is the theory behind why colored lights help. The research behind why colored lights don't provide much difference is based on the same principles. What they don't go into much is that visibility is a matter of individual perception. The same conditions will be seen differently by different people. I find white light just fine, but I know people who swear by different colored lights. My feeling is go out with some different colored filters in poor visibility and see what works for you.
Looks like someone else paid attention in physics class. Hey-O
 

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According to Lightforce.

* AMBER - For highlighting contrast in damp or foggy conditions

* BLACK - Opaque protective covers for lights when not in use

* BLUE - For marine applications. Also the greatest filter for driving in the snow.

* CLEAR - Protective cover for the lens, standard with driving lights

* GREEN - Specifically for spotting animals with sensitive eyes

* RED - Most popular for study of nocturnal animals and night hunting of light shy animals. eg. Rabbit, fox and wild boar. (Many animals are unable to see RED due to lack of color vision.) Also popular for Law Enforcement.

* INFRA RED FILTERS: Used with 1st, 2nd and 3rd generation Night Vision Image Intensifiers with an 840-920 nanometer wave length. *

They missed the yellow filter, but I recall reading about it being useful in foggy and dusty conditions. Similar to amber I suppose. It would allow a little more light through then amber.
 

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Short wavelengths scatters more than light with long
wavelengths (short to long: violet, indigo, blue, green, yellow, orange,
red). So, a long wavelength light will be best. :) Tim
 

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Short wavelengths scatters more than light with long
wavelengths (short to long: violet, indigo, blue, green, yellow, orange,
red). So, a long wavelength light will be best. :) Tim
Which is why it befuddles me as to why people buy these rediculous blue bulbs for their vehicles. It's not bright, it's just distracting.
 

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^ because they are uneducated, and think it looks "cool" people are dumb these days.
 
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