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UGH !! Not happy, I took my FJ in for an oil change. Once I returned home I decided to check oil level to make sure it was good and while looking over the engine I noticed oil on my front skid. I crawled under and noticed oil was dripping from the filter housing. I turned the wheel so I could wipe the housing and it has continued to leak.
It appears the tech may have over tighten the housing, it looks like it's a good 1.5" past the alignment notches.

I've called the dealership and raised holy hell and have a meeting with the service manager in the morning.

I figured I would have all my maintenance done by a dealership, never again.

Man I'm pissed.:rawr::soapbox::soapbox::soapbox:
 

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sometimes stuff happens, if you can do it yourself, do it! no matter how much you believe mechanics are ripping you off, ... bring it back or have them tow it they will cover it, some times the seal leaks and it does not show up right away, seen it before...
 

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oil changes are done by the lowest of the lowly techs.
 

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The lowest of the lowly techs decided not to screw my oil filter on the last time I paid the dealer to have my oil changed...that was 7 years ago. I'm the only one who touches her now.
 

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BucNtears

Did you determine what the root cause of the oil leak was?
Missing or damaged O-ring(s)?
Insufficiently tightened oil filter housing cap or cap drain plug?
Cracked plastic oil filter housing cap?
Cross-threaded oil filter housing cap?
Missing oil filter housing cap drain plug?
Something else?

There are a number of errors that can be made when servicing the new cartridge-type filters that were impossible with the old spin-on filters.
 

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oil changes are done by the lowest of the lowly techs.
Got to start them out somewhere....

BucNtears


There are a number of errors that can be made when servicing the new cartridge-type filters that were impossible with the old spin-on filters.
I disagree, nothing is foolproof for a talented fool....
 

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fabricgator -

The statement I made was that there are specific types of errors that can be made with the new cartridge-type filter that could not be made with the spin-on filters. This is a true statement. Nowhere did I say (or imply) that spin-on filters were "foolproof".

Here are some of the common errors that "could" be made with spin-on filters:

1. Wrong filter PN used (usually not immediately fatal to the engine as long as there is no external oil leakage).

2. O-ring/seal from old filter left on filter seating surface on engine block. New filter housing never properly seats against the block, the "leftover" O-ring can blow out under pressure and dump all oil in <60 seconds, O-ring blowout may not occur until engine is hot and at high RPM.

3. O-ring/seal somehow omitted from new filter; slow oil leakage is usually (but not always) noticeable as soon as engine is started.

4. New filter not adequately tightened; usual result is oil seepage after engine is hot, but can result in total loss of oil if filter "unscrews" under vibration.


And here are some of the common errors that "could" be made with the new cartridge filter:

1. Filter housing re-assembled with no filter cartridge installed (no external leakage, but no oil filtering taking place).

2. Wrong length filter cartridge installed (Toyota has several nearly-identical-looking filter cartridges that differ only by length). No external leakage, but oil not being properly filtered.

3. O-ring omitted from filter housing cap where it seals against the filter housing (slow oil leakage).

4. O-ring omitted from drain plug on filter housing cap (slow oil leakage).

5. Filter housing cap not tightened to proper torque value (too little may leak or allow cap to unscrew under vibration, too much may crack cap).

6. Filter housing cap drain plug not tightened to proper torque value (too little may leak or allow plug to unscrew under vibration).

This is all part of "FMEA", Failure Modes and Affects Analysis, where the design engineer tries to forsee all possible failure modes (both mechanical and human error), and incorporate design features that prevent or minimize the effects of these failures. Although there are some benefits to the new oil filter design on the 2010+ 1GR-FE engines, there are also some completely new failure modes.
 
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