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When you performed your "wheels spin freely" test, you removed all four front brake pads, right?

Very rarely do worn & noisy wheel bearings affect the "free-spinning" characteristic of a wheel hub unless the bearing is literally disintegrating.

If the bearing had enough internal friction (with no load on it) to obviously affect wheel drag when spun by hand, the bearing would be literally smoking after an hour on the freeway at 65 MPH.

I think it's unlikely that your front wheel bearing has gone bad at 57K miles unless it has somehow been subjected to extremely severe abuse.

If you didn't pull the pads the first time, I'd remove the wheel again, pull the pads, and repeat your "spins freely/listen for noise & roughness"" test before going through all the effort and expense of replacing the wheel bearing, which is not a trivial job on the FJ. You know that the wheel bearing is press-fitted into the steering knuckle, right?
I don't think the noise I am experiencing is not brake pad related. I will be replacing the entire assembly, so no press fitting needed. Maybe my analysis is wrong, but I will post up if it fixes the issue or not.
 

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I don't think the noise I am experiencing is not brake pad related. I will be replacing the entire assembly, so no press fitting needed. Maybe my analysis is wrong, but I will post up if it fixes the issue or not.
So you did not remove the brake pads when you performed your "spinning wheel drag test", comparing the spin-down rate of the RH and LH front wheels?

I didn't say that brake pads were the source of the noise, I said that the drag of the brake pads (if you didn't remove them) would have likely masked any "friction" originating in the bearings.

Also, in your earlier post you stated that you ordered a new wheel bearing and a "new hub". Is the hub damaged? If not, why replace it? You know that the wheel bearing is in the steering knuckle, and not in the hub, right? And that to replace the wheel bearing you have to remove the entire steering knuckle. Once the steering knuckle is removed from the vehicle it is possible to R&R the bearing, but it does require the use of a 25 or 50 ton hydraulic press to remove the old and install the new bearing.

(I'm assuming that yours is a 4WD model? The 2WD is slightly different.)
 

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So you did not remove the brake pads when you performed your "spinning wheel drag test", comparing the spin-down rate of the RH and LH front wheels?

I didn't say that brake pads were the source of the noise, I said that the drag of the brake pads (if you didn't remove them) would have likely masked any "friction" originating in the bearings.

Also, in your earlier post you stated that you ordered a new wheel bearing and a "new hub". Is the hub damaged? If not, why replace it? You know that the wheel bearing is in the steering knuckle, and not in the hub, right? And that to replace the wheel bearing you have to remove the entire steering knuckle. Once the steering knuckle is removed from the vehicle it is possible to R&R the bearing, but it does require the use of a 25 or 50 ton hydraulic press to remove the old and install the new bearing.

(I'm assuming that yours is a 4WD model? The 2WD is slightly different.)
No I did not remove the pads. The 'test' I did was something I had seen done before on a truck with a bad front bearing.

I am the entire unit with one of these:
Blue Pit Bearings | 2003-2014 TOYOTA & LEXUS 4X4 and 4X2 COMPLETE FRONT HUB WHEEL BEARING ASSEMBLIES

I just want to do everything because my time is limited. This will save me from running around getting stuff pressed. I also don't want to disassemble the unit and find out I need more parts. It costs more to go this route, but makes life easier and frees up my driveway faster.

If the weather cooperates I will have it swapped out this weekend.
 

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No I did not remove the pads. The 'test' I did was something I had seen done before on a truck with a bad front bearing.

I am the entire unit with one of these:
Blue Pit Bearings | 2003-2014 TOYOTA & LEXUS 4X4 and 4X2 COMPLETE FRONT HUB WHEEL BEARING ASSEMBLIES

I just want to do everything because my time is limited. This will save me from running around getting stuff pressed. I also don't want to disassemble the unit and find out I need more parts. It costs more to go this route, but makes life easier and frees up my driveway faster.

If the weather cooperates I will have it swapped out this weekend.
For future reference is this the same thing? Parts - midstatesoffroad

Just making sure I understand, in case I need to replace one of these in the future.
 

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For future reference is this the same thing? Parts - midstatesoffroad

Just making sure I understand, in case I need to replace one of these in the future.
It is the same basic part. The countries of origin of some of the components are different.
 

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check your rear diff seals - see if theres any leakage by your tires

sounds like what mine was doing & a swap (or a rebuild) fixed it :)
 

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Texas TT -

OK, now I see exactly what you intend to do. You're replacing the entire hub/bearing/bearing housing module as a unit, and not just the wheel bearing. You won't need to press anything in or out if you replace the whole module.

I was incorrect in saying that the bearing was pressed into the steering knuckle. There are actually a pair of tapered roller bearings pressed into the hub/bearing/bearing housing module, and that can be replaced as a complete module pretty easily.
 

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My rear diff makes a whirring sound when decelerating around 60mph.
Mine is a a 2013 with 22k miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Interestingly, now that the weather has warmed up about 30 degrees (it is 20F degrees this morning), the noise is nearly non-existent. In fact if I hadn't been listening for it I probably wouldn't have even noticed it today. Trying to figure out what this means...
 

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Replacing the bearing assembly seems to have fixed my issue. I have been driving around for a week or so and all I hear is (normal) tire noise now.

I also had to replace a tie rod on that side as the boot was ruptured. This also required that I get an alignment. It don't remember it, but it could be that I tagged that wheel off pavement in the past.

It was not hard to replace the entire bearing/hub unit. Probably less than an hour if you were just replacing this. The only special tool needed is that giant socket for the spindle nut.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Interesting. Our weather has continued warm (by our standards) and the noise is 95% gone. Still trying to figure out what could be that affected by temp. I wouldn't think a wheel bearing noise would vary much with temp. I am going to keep monitoring it for now.
 

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I guess I spoke too soon, turns out I was wrong. My noise came back the first time I went in and out of 4x4. In 4x4 it made no noise, in 4x2 it was back with a vengeance.

At this point I was pretty sure it is powertrain related, so I took it to the dealer (I have about 1800 miles left on the powertrain warranty). After looking at it for 4 hours, they tried to tell me this bearing nose was due to a bad bushing on the lower control arm. They also found a leak in my Icon strut. I told them (again) to put it on the lift and rotate the wheel by hand and listen. I also reminded them that the wheel bearing had been replaced. 10 minutes later the diagnosis was a bad bearing in the transfer case.

I don’t think they were being deceptive, just a breakdown of communication somewhere.

At this point the service writer got the manual out of my glove box and took it into his manager’s office. I think they may have been looking over the service record for gear oil changes. (The dealer changed it once and I had changed it at least once, thank goodness I made note of that.) I don’t fault them for this, just due diligence on their part.

So the wheel bearing was not the cause of my issue, but if the dealer tried to replace that first (it is a very similar noise) then it probably saved me time and money in the long run.

The transfer case is on national backorder, so I am not sure when this will all get fixed. They still need to get back with me on the cost to fix the suspension stuff. I left the truck with them.

So I have learned: do as much of the work as possible yourself, keep records, take the truck in if it looks like a warranty item.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Thanks for following up. I wish I could hear your hum to see if it is the same as mine.

Can't they replace the bearing without replacing the whole t-case?
 

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Discussion Starter #34
The noise has persisted, so I finally took it in to the dealer today. The services manager went for a test drive with me. I was paranoid they would play dumb and claim they couldn't hear it, but he said he could hear it right away. He did some swerving, more violently than I had tried, and the change in the sound was apparent. He diagnosed it as the left front wheel bearing.

It seems a bit early for a wheel bearing at 50K, even if it is a 2010, but I am just glad it has been diagnosed and wasn't a figment of my imagination.
 
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