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Howdy, I recently purchased a 2007 FJcruiser TRD package with 152k on it, the truck is very clean and in really good shape all around. I am gonna be moving to Oregon to continue my education as well as be with my partner who lives there. I have a 1980mi (ish) drive ahead of me and I was wondering what should I do to my FJ to prep? I am a college student so I cant go about replacing my OME shocks or anything like that. what do you guys think? also any tips for improving gas mileage? My FJ must be getting about 15 on the highway, its only got a 3in lift with street tires so I dont know what could be sapping my mileage.
 

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That's not that long of a drive. Just check your fluids and change the oil if needed . Make sure your tire pressure is where it should be so the mpg doesn`t suffer.....enjoy the trip :)
 
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Howdy, I recently purchased a 2007 FJcruiser TRD package with 152k on it, the truck is very clean and in really good shape all around. I am gonna be moving to Oregon to continue my education as well as be with my partner who lives there. I have a 1980mi (ish) drive ahead of me and I was wondering what should I do to my FJ to prep? I am a college student so I cant go about replacing my OME shocks or anything like that. what do you guys think? also any tips for improving gas mileage? My FJ must be getting about 15 on the highway, its only got a 3in lift with street tires so I dont know what could be sapping my mileage.
To start I run an app to track my MPG and am very OCD when it comes to keeping track of that information. These are some things I found over the last 9 months or so. When I want to improve gas mileage I have to do a few things. I run the tires a lot harder than normal, around 40-44 psi. I think the biggest factor is speed. The faster you go then worse your mileage will be. I ran 55 mph for about 200 miles coming back from the Oregon coast and got 18.5 MPG. When I kicked my speed up to 80 it dropped to about 16.7. On longer trips I found running 91 or higher octane improves gas mileage enough to justify cost. However in stop and go it does not. I just did a 991 mile push and was getting 13.0 MPG driving about 70-80 with AC on.
I figured I would give you information to consider when driving that far in late July early August.
 

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I just drove from California to Virginia for college (2700 miles). Just need a courtesy maintenance to check all the fluids and brake pads. I did that at a local shop for free. but I don't think it would cost too much at a dealer, since a 10k maintenance is around $70. BTW make sure that windshield washer fluid is full, cause a lots of bugs will die on your windshield :p.
 
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I get 10 mpg if I'm lucky on the highway, but I drive very fast and have a bit of extra weight.
If you're worried about the mpg stick to the low end of the speedometer.
Check your rear diff date btw, early models seem to be prone to failures. I change my fluid often as a precaution.
Scope the other fluids, in an 07 particularly trans if you don't know when it was last serviced. 07 trans shudder. Fun stuff.
 

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sounds like a great road trip.
I would track down the service record and try to find what has not been done.
As noted before, these are not gas misers, so take lots of money for fuel.
I would def check the basics, hoses, belt, fluid levels, brakes, and tires.
Enjoy the ride.
 
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I hope y'all don't mind if I do a little math here.

First, the higher the temperature the lower your gas mileage will be especially if you have a lead foot. You've been driving in Texas and even though it has been a mild summer so far there have been more than a few 99 degree days

Second, you have a 3 inch lift which will reduce your gas mileage.

Third, forget about all that since it's a sunk cost and focus on speed.

If you are going 80 MPH v 60 MPH on a 2000 mile journey you will also reduce your arrival time by over 13 hours (it would take you about 33.3 hours at 60 mph and 25 hours at 80 MPH).

Just for the sake of making the math simple, say you are getting 200 miles per tank at 60 MPH (very pessimistic) and 160 miles per tank (insanely pessimistic) at 80 MPH.

At 60 MPH fuel costs would be about $440 (10 tanks x $2.20 per gallon). At 80 MPH your fuel cost would be an additional $110 (12.5 tanks) absolute worst case scenario (more like $75 in my vehicle).

The minimum wage is over $7/hr.

It ultimately depends on how much you value your time.

I am very lucky these days to be able to drive over 17 hours a day but 13 hours is a piece of cake, so at the lower speed I would factor in the cost of a motel room for one extra night and a few extra meals.

I'm doing these calculations in a head filled with Tito's Vodka right now so somebody please correct me if I am wrong but monetarily it's close to a wash as far as I can tell and in my experience 80 MPH makes for a somewhat cheaper trip monetarily given how many 2000 mile road trips I've been on, not to mention the "personal" factor when you're travelling on an extended road trip with another person.

In short, I can think of many people who I would spend $10/hr. to not have to spend time around so that boosts my bill by over $130 for the low speed road trip, depending on who I am traveling with.

You also end up with an extra 13.3 hours of your life that you will never get back. At my age, that could make all the difference.:smile

YMMV (pun obviously intended)!

The moral of the story is drive 80 MPH on the highway, take all side trips that look interesting, and travel with somebody who you would pay to be around rather than NOT be around.

Have fun!:smile:
 

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I should have emphasized the point made above about bugs on the windshield. I would also carry a bottle of Windex and a dozen microfiber towels.

And what the heck are you doing going from Texas to Oregon in the first place?I hope you got a big scholarship.

Any state whose flagship school has a duck as their mascot is highly suspect in my book:grin

If you were my son we'd be sitting down to have "The Talk."
 

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well, Im actually taking the cash in my bank account and the basic stuff and moving out there with what I can fit in my FJ. I am gonna be continuing college in Bend Oregon at COCC. I am also going to be with my significant other who lives there. Im really gonna have to penny pinch already so I think Im just gonna take the 60mph route. I actually have gotten almost 400 to a tank before which was at highway speed going about an average of 70 so I dont know. I was thinking for spending the night somewhere I am gonna stop at a campground and pitch one of my tents for the night. going from a 2010 camry hybrid which gets about 500 to a tank to my FJ is pretty stressful gas and money wise lol.
 

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I have made a couple of Austin - Out West runs this year and have a couple of observations. 1) The faster you go, the more gas it sucks and I usually set the cruise on around 65-68 mph. Having said that, (pulling a small camping trailer) I do not use cruise control in the mountains (that includes the more gentle run-up to the actual steeper peak portions) so as to prevent the cruise control kicking the tranny into a lower gear than desired and leave it in 4th (as opposed to D) going uphill so that I can control my speed with my foot rather than the tranny. If I need to drop down to 3rd, I do so. Lower gear equals lower gas mileage. 2) The lowest priced fuel on the gas pumps out west normally only show an 85-86 octane rating and I believe that is too low for the FJ to perform as well as it can. 3) The closest place from Texas (heading to Oregon) that you can sleep in a tent overnight without sweating away is in the lower end of the national forest that is located just to the east of Santa Fe. From that point on, if you run west on a line that does not drop too low (south), you can sleep in one of many national forests or BLM land for low cost as opposed to motels without worrying about the hellish heat we associate with in Texas summertime. 4) Watch your fuel gauge when running across northern New Mexico because the Indian reservations are not loaded with gas stops. I start looking at 1/2 tank because 1/4 tank may be too low if something out of the ordinary (vis a vis fuel purchasing) comes along. No, it isn't Big Bend scarce, but still, pay attention. 5) You will see some beautiful terrain, have fun because it may not be a trip you are able to repeat anytime soon.
 

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For fuel economy t 60 to 65 mph I have gotten up to 21 mpg and that is with 100lb bumper, 60lb winch, rock rails,33 A/T's, and full 5 gallon jerry can.That is with just 89 octane on my 2008 with 122000 miles. Though as soon as I hit 70-75 it instantly drops to 16.5 mpg.
 

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Welcome! Not gonna lie, a little envious you are moving to Oregon! ;) I'm hoping to take residence there one of these years.
 

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I hope y'all don't mind if I do a little math here.

First, the higher the temperature the lower your gas mileage will be especially if you have a lead foot. You've been driving in Texas and even though it has been a mild summer so far there have been more than a few 99 degree days

Second, you have a 3 inch lift which will reduce your gas mileage.

Third, forget about all that since it's a sunk cost and focus on speed.

If you are going 80 MPH v 60 MPH on a 2000 mile journey you will also reduce your arrival time by over 13 hours (it would take you about 33.3 hours at 60 mph and 25 hours at 80 MPH).

Just for the sake of making the math simple, say you are getting 200 miles per tank at 60 MPH (very pessimistic) and 160 miles per tank (insanely pessimistic) at 80 MPH.

At 60 MPH fuel costs would be about $440 (10 tanks x $2.20 per gallon). At 80 MPH your fuel cost would be an additional $110 (12.5 tanks) absolute worst case scenario (more like $75 in my vehicle).

The minimum wage is over $7/hr.

It ultimately depends on how much you value your time.

I am very lucky these days to be able to drive over 17 hours a day but 13 hours is a piece of cake, so at the lower speed I would factor in the cost of a motel room for one extra night and a few extra meals.

I'm doing these calculations in a head filled with Tito's Vodka right now so somebody please correct me if I am wrong but monetarily it's close to a wash as far as I can tell and in my experience 80 MPH makes for a somewhat cheaper trip monetarily given how many 2000 mile road trips I've been on, not to mention the "personal" factor when you're travelling on an extended road trip with another person.

In short, I can think of many people who I would spend $10/hr. to not have to spend time around so that boosts my bill by over $130 for the low speed road trip, depending on who I am traveling with.

You also end up with an extra 13.3 hours of your life that you will never get back. At my age, that could make all the difference.:smile

YMMV (pun obviously intended)!

The moral of the story is drive 80 MPH on the highway, take all side trips that look interesting, and travel with somebody who you would pay to be around rather than NOT be around.

Have fun!:smile:
You do better with Tito's in your head than I do without it!

Cheers!
 

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There is a great community of FJ people here. Everyone is open minded here and the FJ is the perfect fit for the Pacific Northwest. Safe travels and WELCOME!
 

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Shouldn't have any problems with the FJ. I did a 15k trip in April and didn't have any problems. Change fluids and slow down. I got up to 21mpg on a 3 inch lifted rig with BFG ATs.
 

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I just finished a 2,500 mile drive from Montana to Connecticut. This is a Toyota, there's not much at all you need to "prep" for a long drive:
-Fill tank with gas
-Check tire air pressure (including spare!)
-Change oil/fluids if it's time
-Fill windshield wiper reservoir

I do have a few tips for you, the driver though:
-Load up plenty of tunes for the drive
-Pack water, trail mix/snacks, and some baby wipes in case nature calls and you're in the middle of nowhere.

-As mentioned already, you're going to kill THOUSANDS of bugs. I packed about 10 microfiber cloths for the trip and found a self-service car wash every morning to wash all of the previous day's bugs off. I don't like to let bugs dry on the paint or windshield, as it's very hard to remove later.

-As for MPGs go, I wasn't in any rush on my drive and wanted to truly enjoy the trip, so I set the cruise control around 70, even when the posted speed limit was higher. I got around 18.5-20 MPGs doing this (depending on the terrain), but if you keep it around 65 or lower you'll get even better MPGs. I wasn't too concerned about gas mileage, but kept track as I was more curious than anything. Don't worry too much about MPGs - instead, focus on and enjoy the beautiful terrain you're going to encounter. The only thing I did make sure of was to never let the tank get below 1/2 empty, because there are long stretches of NOTHING, and you never know how far the next gas station will be.

Enjoy the drive!
 
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