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Before the biblical rains clear and I get some time to work on my system, I wanted to pass this by all y'all to see if it makes sense.

Am installing a dual parts battery kit. I run a Bulldog 9500 winch. I have a bunch of lights. I do not run a fridge in the fj, the fridge and accessories are on my trailer which has its own power system. My goal is to have a dual battery setup for those "just in case" times, as some of my travels will be far from civilization.

I have 2 options I'm considering:

OPTION 1: Swap the stock battery into the aux battery spot, and put a Diehard Platinum in the main spot. Run everything off the Diehard Plat. Stock battery remains isolated just as a backup in case Diehard dies.

OPTION 2: Since it won't be used for accessories, only for starting the engine, do I really need a Platinum? I can save 40 lbs and at least $100 if I leave the stock battery where it is, run everything off of it, then put another standard battery in the aux battery spot as a backup. There are many threads on this forum where folks swear by their stock battery being plenty fine for running their winch.

Option 2 seems to make more sense, opinions?
 

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Option two sounds like what I have done for myself. I run my accesories off an aux fuse block I installed, but the power is coming from the stock battery in the stock position.

My winch is the only thing connected to my secondary battery (Optima red top), and it is only used when the two batteries are linked.

Other then that the secondary battery is always isolated unless I'm charging it or using it to jump the primary battery.
 

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Since it won't be used for accessories, only for starting the engine, do I really need a Platinum? I can save 40 lbs and at least $100 if I leave the stock battery where it is, run everything off of it, then put another standard battery in the aux battery spot as a backup. There are many threads on this forum where folks swear by their stock battery being plenty fine for running their winch.
The stock battery is fine for running your winch, as long as you don't discharge it too far. The stock Panasonic battery is a starting battery not a deep-cycle.

The reasons that AGM batteries like the Sears Diehard Platinum are so much better for most any application are these, in no particular order:

1. AGM batteries function well as both a starting battery and a deep-cycle; they hold up to repeated discharge/charge cycles much better than a conventional lead plate battery.

2. They are truly no-maintenance; never need water, and the terminals never get sulfate or corrosion on them.

3. Even though they cost twice what a regular battery does, they last at least 3X as long so they are in fact more economical, as long as you are going to keep your truck for many years.
 

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1911: I can't see running the winch with the engine off. I'd think the chance of discharging it too far would be very rare, if at all given my use.

1. I plan to sell my fj in 2016, 6 years. (This is the 1st vehicle that I did a comprehensive analysis on, time will tell...) If a regular battery costs about $120, and I kill one once in the next 6 years, that's still less than an AGM @ $260.

2. There really is no monetary value on this, but I suppose convenience can factor in.

3. So the gold standard is 6 years. Based on this does a heavier more expensive AGM still make sense?
 

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1911: I can't see running the winch with the engine off. I'd think the chance of discharging it too far would be very rare, if at all given my use.
I would never winch with the engine off by choice, but there are certainly circumstances where you would have no other choice but to do so. Even with the engine running at decent rpm the alternator is only putting out 100 amps max and a Warn M8000 (for example) will draw 435 amps when used at it's top-rated capacity (pulling 8,000 lbs.). Edit: Your Bulldog 9500 winch draws 380 amps at full load.

Expensive AGM batteries are not for everyone, but are exceptionally good batteries nevertheless.


Sears Diehard Platinum or optima yellow/red which is better?
Word on the interwebs is that the quality of Optimas has fallen greatly in recent times; take it FWIW. Diehard Platinums are just re-badged Odysseys, which are pretty well-recognized as a top-tier battery.
 

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I think you're good no matter what you do... get out on the trail and enjoy your FJ. There isn't anything wrong with an occasional winch pull on your factory Toyota battery. The Toyota (Panasonic) battery really isn't a bad battery to begin with. Stock battery specs, at least posted by another forum member.

An ideal, long term situation (especially if you're planning on using your winch even somewhat regularly) calls for a deep cycle battery, of which an Optima/DieHard Platinum/Odyssey are the best you can get.

In my mind I've figured it this way, take with every grain of salt you can find:

A DieHard Platinum/Odyssey has rectangular cells, which given the space you're working with under the hood of an FJ is more efficient because the battery tray is rectangular, or cube-ular, however you want to call that. You'll fill more of the battery area with battery with a rectangular battery than anything else.

An Optima, which uses a cylindrical cell, gives you weight savings, but doesn't use all the space available. Take a look at the casing of the battery and you'll pretty plainly see that.

To sum up, an Optima will give you better than factory performance while keeping weight down while a DieHard Platinum/Odyssey will give you the most capacity for it's size you can get, they're heavy though.

Again, I don't think you can go wrong.
 

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1911: I can't see running the winch with the engine off. I'd think the chance of discharging it too far would be very rare, if at all given my use.
The stock alternator puts out a MAX of 140 amps (or maybe 100) It is not putting this out at idle (what you'd be at winching), it is much less.

A winch can easily draw close to 400 amps while running.

You can very easily drain the stock panasonic battery while winching. Draining non-deep cycle batteries and then recharging severely reduces their ability to hold a charge and "kills" them.

I run a Diehard Platinum Marine battery (34 series i believe) in my stock location on the Land Cruiser, and a Yellow top Optima on the passenger side for the lights, CB, etc.

To me, there is no point in running a dual battery setup only to install a non-deepcycle battery just to save some cash. Youre already spending money on the dual battery setup, do it right and get the battery designed for this.

The cheapest and best option is to keep the stock battery and do not attach anything auxiliary to it.
Attach all of your accessories to the secondary auxiliary battery using an aux fuse block, so that if it drains, no big deal, vehicle still starts.
 

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Antarctican said:
I have 2 options I'm considering:

OPTION 1: Swap the stock battery into the aux battery spot, and put a Diehard Platinum in the main spot. Run everything off the Diehard Plat. Stock battery remains isolated just as a backup in case Diehard dies.

OPTION 2: Since it won't be used for accessories, only for starting the engine, do I really need a Platinum? I can save 40 lbs and at least $100 if I leave the stock battery where it is, run everything off of it, then put another standard battery in the aux battery spot as a backup. There are many threads on this forum where folks swear by their stock battery being plenty fine for running their winch.

Option 2 seems to make more sense, opinions?
Leave the stock battery where it is, and invest in a good AGM (i.e. Platinum, Odyssey, etc..) battery as the auxiliary battery. When the stock battery finally goes bad, replace it with an AGM battery, too.

The stock battery is a free acid style, and can create corrosion, leak, and does not hold a charge as well as an AGM (Advanced Glass Mat) battery. Since you are already installing a dual batt system for protection and reserve capacity, use it to it's full potential. The system can't help if the battery is no good :). AGMs have more reserve capacity, longer life, no corrosion, no leakage, and less stress on the charging system.

And an AGM battery is only about 5-10 lbs heavier (not 40 lbs) than a free acid style (due to additional lead plates for increased charge capacity), so the weight issue is negligible, IMO...

Good luck :bigthumb:
 

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Good advice right there^. And just wondering why anyone with one of the pigs we own would worry about 40 pounds anyway? ;D
 

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Leave the stock battery where it is, and invest in a good AGM (i.e. Platinum, Odyssey, etc..) battery as the auxiliary battery. When the stock battery finally goes bad, replace it with an AGM battery, too.

The stock battery is a free acid style, and can create corrosion, leak, and does not hold a charge as well as an AGM (Advanced Glass Mat) battery. Since you are already installing a dual batt system for protection and reserve capacity, use it to it's full potential. The system can't help if the battery is no good :). AGMs have more reserve capacity, longer life, no corrosion, no leakage, and less stress on the charging system.

And an AGM battery is only about 5-10 lbs heavier (not 40 lbs) than a free acid style (due to additional lead plates for increased charge capacity), so the weight issue is negligible, IMO...

Good luck :bigthumb:
And, just for clarification Larry, the winch should be connected to which battery?
 

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And, just for clarification Larry, the winch should be connected to which battery?
The secondary, deep cycle battery is what you should attach the winch too.

Its designed to be drained, and then filled back up with charge many times. The stock battery is not.
 

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The secondary, deep cycle battery is what you should attach the winch too.

Its designed to be drained, and then filled back up with charge many times. The stock battery is not.
Ya I think so too. But there was another opinion (unless I have it backward) that there was an issue with the poximity to the alternator.
 
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