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There in lies one of the issues- there arent any decent worth while upgrades to our alternator. Ive been waiting for Mean Green to finally come out with one but I guess this will take forever....

So, What about these:

https://www.dcpowerinc.com/high-output-alternators.html?make=Toyota&model=FJ+Cruiser&year=2007&engine=4.0L+V6+1GR-FE

And these:
http://www.smartbatterycharger.net/Toyota/1/0.html

And even Mean Green:
FJ CRUISER

Did I miss something in terms of decent upgrades being available??
 

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As far as I know, the battery in a car is only needed to start the engine. Once the engine starts, the power needed to run the radio, speakers, and all fancy electrical components, are all powered by the alternator.

To me it seems if one needs more power (due to added equipments that need more power), one needs a better alternator.

Could someone tell me what's going on?
Bingo!
Unless you want to apply your electrical loads with the off, then battery storage is what you want. If that's the way the loads are applied then you should use a disconnect in the circuit so you still have a battery to start the engine. Resistance type battery isolators are really a waste of time, they turn a lot of amperage into heat and the charge rates in vehicles nowadays are a little much for them. Diode type are OK but still kind of funny. The relay type or "smart" voltage sensing type are what you want. You will get full amperage through them and when your voltage drops too far they will open the circuit.
If you can run the engine that is the way to go. Your battery/batteries is just a reference point so your alternator knows what to do.

If you have...
150 amps charging,
A 500 amp load,
6 batteries,
You are still discharging.

For a small or normal case alternator dcpowerinc makes some nice alternators that I have used and have tested before. Premier power (the onboard welder guys) makes some tough ones, again that I have used and have tested under load.
For the larger size cases either leece-neville or neihoff is what you want.


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Discussion Starter #43
Do they work with FJ 2010?

The 1st one is only 2007-2008. The 2nd one doesn't say anything about FJ from
what I could see.

The 3rd one uses marquee in their HTML code and that's not very professional
and scares me of what they might do to my car (i.e. if they use marquee in
their HTML [which I understand], what could they possibly put in my alternator
[which I don't understand]).
 

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Any thoughts on how much HP is lost upon installing a higher Amp alternator?
1hp = 746w
746w @ 12vdc = 62a
270a = 4.35hp
That is not a constant pull. The amperage only comes up under load. No load at high rpm there is no difference.

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My take on dual batteries:


Not worth it unless a single 2150 battery wont be enough for your reserve capacity needs (IE your running electronics for a long time with the engine off). Most peoples dual battery setups amount to putting a 140hp 4 banger (stock battery) and a 300hp V8 (one bigger then stock aftermarket battery in one car to get 440hp, when they could have just put a single 440hp motor (big battery) for less money and less complexity.

A single 2150 battery can run a winch (with the truck running) for a very long time, I have never gone below 50% charge and I have had some tough stuck in mud pulls with my 12,500 superwinch. I have used my winch over 17 times now (4 times in a single night recently) and my 2150 battery and stock alt is enough to handle a 12.5 winch (but I don't have enough lighting put on the truck to absolutely need a bigger alt).

The only real 2 benefits to a dual battery setup is 1) if the primary battery has a failure, you can still start your truck without having to get a jump, replace the battery, or get out of your truck. If I was going to be out in the middle of nowhere by myself, miles from anything, a second battery would be a good thing to have. So would 2 spare tires, a spare CV axel, a ham radio, a full tool kit, and all sorts of other things similar if you want that "prepared" setup. The second benefit is increased reserve capacity, however like I said previous your not going to gain much throwing another stock like battery in the mix.

Does it make sense to spend 300$ (plus another battery) to have a fully setup dual battery kit? Well for most people I would say no. If you want to run things for days on end like fridges, it would make sense. Just remember Murphy's law, anything that can go wrong will go wrong. A single big battery has a lot lower chance of failure then two batteries and a bunch of wiring that most people will likely install incorrectly. Also runing duals with most setups will reduce the lifespan of each battery (mostly if they are different batteries and depending on how they are wired). Keep that in mind too.
 

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Hey while on the subject of AGM batteries I found this in a recent Crawl Magazine

How to recharge Deeply discharged AGM batteries

To bring them back to life, wire in parallel, a fully charged standard battery (non AGM), the discharged AGM and a battery charger. Once the AGM is up to 10.5 volts, charge it directly.

From the photo, it looks like the hooked up the battery and charger to the AGM using the jumper leads. So the AGM is actually hooked up to both at the same time.

Pretty cool considering I was always told they are scrap it they fall below 10.5
 

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Hey while on the subject of AGM batteries I found this in a recent Crawl Magazine

How to recharge Deeply discharged AGM batteries

To bring them back to life, wire in parallel, a fully charged standard battery (non AGM), the discharged AGM and a battery charger. Once the AGM is up to 10.5 volts, charge it directly.

From the photo, it looks like the hooked up the battery and charger to the AGM using the jumper leads. So the AGM is actually hooked up to both at the same time.

Pretty cool considering I was always told they are scrap it they fall below 10.5
You can do that with any battery if they are completely discharged. They need to know their polarity before they will take a charge. I wouldn't take it to 10.5 though, just enough to give it something. You should also do that through a load the problem is most people don't have a load big enough to handle that. Its hard on both batteries to do that. AGMs don't like a high amp rate or a high charging voltage.
I shock a battery like that at least once a month.

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