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Wild Bill, kudos on the post. He nailed it, the only thing I would add is most mountable commercial fire extinguishers for vehicles are designed to allow you to create more time for egress. A good vehicle far will cough for a few seconds at 5 lb'er allowing you time to get out. And just to add to other's credit call the fire dept, then the Insurance Co and order your new FJ.

Be safe

:flamed:
 

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WildBillKelso said:
Here's some more knowledge. There are different types of extinguishers A,B,C,D,K,Halon, Wet.
Class A Fire= ancipiant, woods, papers
Class B Fire= Flammable Liquids
Class C Fire= Electrical Fires
Class D Fire= Flammable Metal
Class K Fire ext.= For grease fires, you'll see these in Hood systems in Kitchens
Halon=Stay Away From Them YOU CAN DIE FROM ASORBTION OF HALON! They're mainly used in big computer rooms for servers and in plants but are being phased out due to the dangers of it's use.
Wet extinguishers= "Pump Cans" or water extinguishers really self explanitory.

I'd mount a 5lb. ABC ext. if needed. But remember even though it has a "C" on it for electrical fire it will still carry a charge. It uses a "broken" pattern of dry powder type ABC Chemical (which is also HIGHLY corrosive too!) but the problem is that is discharges so fast it will give you a little jolt. It won't hurt to bad, just enough to let you know it's there and you stop. But you can kick it back up again.

Stay at least 5 ft away and sweep DO NOT GOUGE ANY FUEL and be mindfull of people around you.

Also I'm with the other guy on here. LET THAT SUCKER BURN! Call the FD and your insurance company, that's why you've got it! But for now if you want to have one the best to buy is called a "Purple K". It's best on vehicle fires.http://www.smokesign.com/purkfirex.html

That's the one's the military carries in all of they're vehicles, even tanks and choppers.

Oh yeah forgot about Co2 Extinguishers, but don't worry about those in a vehicle. WAAAAaaayy TO HEAVY!
Great guidance and important info. I now know which one to buy...Thank You!
 

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Thanks,


Hope it can help the unlucky few that may have this happen to them in the future. Was dead serious about that Halon stuff though. It can hurt you just as much as the fire will. Good luck guys and I hope ya'll never have to use it!
 

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WildBillKelso said:
Thanks,


Hope it can help the unlucky few that may have this happen to them in the future. Was dead serious about that Halon stuff though. It can hurt you just as much as the fire will. Good luck guys and I hope ya'll never have to use it!
DUDE!! You Rock!!:rocker:
 

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Good post WildBill:)
I had to use my extinguisher once on a guys truck that had an engine fire. Turned out to be an electrical fire (battery cables). That was about 15 years ago. Haven't had to use one since and hopefully that was the last time! But just in case I have a extinguisher in the back of the FJ and my 4runner.
 

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Well,

I'm just glad I'm not having to show you guys this.



Way to hot for that now. But we'll kick it up agian in Sept.

I'm the guy in the yellow hat.
 

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WildBillKelso said:
Thanks,


Hope it can help the unlucky few that may have this happen to them in the future. Was dead serious about that Halon stuff though. It can hurt you just as much as the fire will. Good luck guys and I hope ya'll never have to use it!

Isn't Halon being used extensively in race cars? I've recently heard of someone who races a 4Runner in timed events (closed road) and they were saying everyone uses Halon, both inside the cabin and in the engine bay.

I know I used to have Halon in the engine bay of my 911 and that was mainly to avoid the mess of cleanup if a fire was to occur leading to the use of a suppression system.

Your thoughts appreciated.
 

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Huckleberry said:
I would rant about this thread but why even bother!!!!! A freakin fire extinguisher...sheeeesh give me a friggin break!!!!!
A) That is a rant, so make up your mind.
B) Oregon requires an extinguisher in a Class II vehicle while in OHV areas.

--Bill
 

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Huckleberry said:
I would rant about this thread but why even bother!!!!! A freakin fire extinguisher...sheeeesh give me a friggin break!!!!!

What do you mean? Your point (if there is one) is unclear. If you don't like the subject why are you posting into it?
 

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Well I can't say much about the racing. As racing isn't subject to the same laws as to what goes into street legal machines.

Halons are far less mess to clean. But I can't tell you enough to use caution if using one of these. If I have a fire in a small area and it's either use the Halon or burn up. The Halon will definitly serve it's prupose. I'll worry about the other stuff later. But if you've got a choice before purchasing one, grab a purple K.

As far as the rant goes. . .that was your rant. But if you feel the need to continue. . .do so. . .I'm mean it's just a fire extinguisher.

Can't tell you how many people I've seen wish they had one at the time. Cause they were trapped and that fire doesn't care what you think.
IT'S COMING FOR YOU! & it'll win everytime. But if you want feel free to prove me wrong. :flame:
 

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Ah,

A camping/trail use fire tip sticky.

I'd have to get my brother-in-law on for that though. He's a Helitach. Firefighter.

Just like a smokejumper cept he gets to ride and chopper and doesn't worry about the 1000ft decent.

I could go on and on about fire safety, but the fact still remains.

USE COMMON SENCE.
 

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Wildbill is dead on in his posts. Race cars run different regs, different fuels and fires, and also have hundreds of thousands of dollars in a single vehicle. (It's also an industry run by rednecks!) Be cautious of following that example. Computer labs may still use Halon, due to it's cleanliness but there are dozens of cases of security and employee deaths from them going and people getting caught in areas where halon is used. Halon actually displaces the oxygen to extinguish the fire. In offices or smaller spaces like cars, and boats they create an extreme life-safety hazard. Once very popular in the boating world, almost all have been replaced to date. They also wreak havoc depleting the ozone layer. Because of this, an international agreement (The Montreal Protocol on Substances thet Deplete the Ozone) was attempted to phase out the production of Halogens by 2000, and the US stopped producing halogens at the end of 1993.

Use it if you want, they can still be found and they work great on internal combustion engines, but it's dangerous and Ma Nature thinks your a jerk. :bandit:
Isn't Halon being used extensively in race cars? I've recently heard of someone who races a 4Runner in timed events (closed road) and they were saying everyone uses Halon, both inside the cabin and in the engine bay.

I know I used to have Halon in the engine bay of my 911 and that was mainly to avoid the mess of cleanup if a fire was to occur leading to the use of a suppression system.

Your thoughts appreciated.
 

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I read somewhere that an amazing number of vehicles catch fire in the US every day... the number was in the hundreds of vehicles per day.
 

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I was picking up a load of books in the company car (a Pacifica), and because we're a gov't entity all our vehicles have extinguishers mounted by our motorpool. The Pacifica had it mounted in the trunk in the drivers side. While exiting the freeway, I guess the boxes shifted and somehow caused the extinguisher to discharge, being a hot day I had the AC on and the windows closed. Luckily I was off the fwy, pushed the drivers side window button open was able to get out before the yellow cloud engulfed the interior. So here I am on the side of the road coughing exiting a vehicle emitting yellow smoke. After a few more seconds it stopped, the entire inside of the car was covered in yellow powder, it sticks very well to the inside of the windshield and windows. Had to call work for a tow. Despite this I'd rather have an extinguisher in case I need it. The extinguisher was all metal with a metal pin and a plastic tie-wrap holding the pin in place, so I still can't figure why it discharged.
 

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Check the pin.

If the pin that was in the extinguisher is missing or has been sheared, than more than likely; Yes, the load shift set off the unit. This acctually has happened to me and cause over $1500.00 in damages.

While working for the F/D for the past 10 years I use to deliver and service extinguishers part time for Farerra Fire Inc. part time a few years back. While hauling over 200 in the back of my F150 (w/electric bedcover) some idiot didn't place a pin in a few of the units. The load shifted and 3 went off. 3 5lb. ABC's. The powder is highly corrosive and got into the gear of the bedcover and binded it up.

Asked the manager to at least pick up 1/2 the bill for a new bedcover, was told some sarcastic thing by him. Handed in my resignation and started at LSU FETI teaching industrial firefighting the next day.


So just watch where you mount these things. Besides that if you've got one your safe.
 

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I read somewhere that an amazing number of vehicles catch fire in the US every day... the number was in the hundreds of vehicles per day.
Taken from Aug. 2005 NFPA Study.

Last year, 19 percent of the 1.55 million reported fires were vehicle fires, according to NFPA. An estimated 550 people died and 1,500 were injured in 297,000 vehicle fires, at a cost of more than $1.3 billion in property damage.

On average, 31 such fires were reported every hour and one person died every day as a result of these fires.

NFPA offers the following safety tips to avoid vehicle fires:

Maintain your car. Follow manufacturer's recommendations for scheduled maintenance. Have any mechanical or electrical problems repaired promptly.
If a fire starts in a vehicle you are driving, pull over to the side of the road if possible, stop the vehicle, turn off the engine, get out of the vehicle and move away quickly.
Call the fire department. Do not attempt to open the hood or fight an engine compartment fire on your own.
On a better note. . .the double edged sword of the fireservice for guys like me can be summed up with 2 words. JOB SECURITY
 

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One additional thing I was always taught about powder type fire extinguishers is the powder can/will “pack”. Purple K is like a very fine face powder, when the extinguisher sets in one position for an extended period of time, and then add the bounce of the moving vehicle, the powder will pack down to the bottom and form a very solid clot. This is also true if even lying on its side. When this happens, you can lose quite a bit of efficiency of the extinguisher, or possibly have it reduced to a single puff.

To keep the powder as loose as practical, periodically invert the extinguisher. This will allow the powder to unpack and flow the other direction. If it cannot be temporarily inverted, at least take it out of its holder and physically shack it, turn it upside down, roll it on the ground, but get the powder to move/flow around inside of the extinguisher.

Jerry D.
 
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