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WD 40 will attract dust and fine dirt, making it all that much harder to clean, and it will get dirty faster. When you wash your truck, lift the hood and wipe the motor and engine bay down with a damp cloth. Keep it clean, and that's all you'll have to do. When I had my Mach, and with my 65 Mustang, I detail the rubber parts like hoses, vacuum lines, etc. But I use 303 Protectant, a product that doesn't attract dirt like WD does.
 

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siegelreptiles, Since you said the A/C was getting a little warm as well, I would suggest you consider using your newly acquired Thruxton on the A/C condensor as well when you are cleaning the radiator.

DEWFPO
 

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Does anyone have a link for that Thuxton wand?
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
seems to be running like it used to--as a matter of fact they did the alignment really well. Definately gonna tear it up with the thruxton when I get it-Ben
 

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you think spraying everything down with wd40 after a good cleaning will make it easier to clean in the future?-is that safe for pretty much anything under the hood?--I am a big fan of the WD-that **** will even kill ants!!
:cheers:

WD-40 - Water Displacement #40





The product began from a search for a rust preventative solvent and

degreaser to protect missile parts.

WD-40 was created in 1953 by three technicians at the San Diego Rocket

Chemical Company. Its name comes from the project that was to find a

"water displacement" compound. They were successful with the fortieth

formulation, thus WD-40. The Corvair Company bought it in bulk to

protect their atlas missile parts.

The workers were so pleased with the product, they began smuggling

(also known as "shrinkage" or "stealing") it out to use at home. The

executives decided there might be a consumer market for it and put it

in aerosol cans. The rest, as they say, is history.

It is a carefully guarded recipe known only to four people. Only one

of them is the "brew master." There are about 2.5 million gallons of the

stuff manufactured each year. It gets its distinctive smell from a

fragrance

that is added to the brew.

Ken East (one of the original founders) says there is nothing in WD-40

that would hurt you.

When you read the "shower door" part, try it. It's the first thing

that has ever cleaned that spotty shower door. If yours is plastic, it

works just as well as glass. It's a miracle!

Then try it on your stove top...Voila! It's now shinier than it's ever

been.

You'll be amazed.

Here are some of the uses:

Protects silver from tarnishing.

Cleans and lubricates guitar strings.

Gives floors that 'just-waxed' sheen without making it slippery.

Keeps flies off cows.

Restores and cleans chalkboards.

Removes lipstick stains.

Loosens stubborn zippers.

Untangles jewelry chains.

Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.



Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.

Keeps ceramic/terra cotta garden pots from oxidizing.



Removes tomato stains from clothing.



Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.



Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.



Keeps scissors working smoothly.

Lubricates noisy door hinges on vehicles and doors in homes.



Gives a children's play gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.


Lubricates gear shift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on

riding mowers.


Rids kids rocking chairs and swings of squeaky noises.



Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to

open.



Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.



Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as

vinyl bumpers .



Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.



Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.



Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons, and bicycles for easy

handling.

Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running

smoothly.

Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.



Removes splattered grease on stove.



Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.



Lubricates prosthetic limbs.



Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).



Removes all traces of duct tape.



Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and kn! ees to relieve

arthritis

pain.



Florida's favorite use is: "cleans and removes love bugs from grills

and bumpers."



The favorite use in the state of New York--WD-40 protects the Statue

of Liberty from the elements.


WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a LITTLE on live bait or lures and you will

be catching the big one in no time. Also, it's a lot cheaper than the
chemical attractants that are made for just that purpose. Keep in mind

though, using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not

allowed in some states.



Use it for fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops

the itch.


WD-40 is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray on the mark and

wipe with a clean rag.


Also, if you've discovered that your teenage daughter has washed and

dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the lipstick

spots with WD-40 and re-wash. Presto! Lipstick is gone!



If you sprayed WD-40 on the distributor cap, it would displace the

moisture and allow the car to start.


It removes black scuff marks from the kitchen floor!



Use WD-40 for those nasty tar and scuff marks on flooring. It doesn't

seem to harm the finish and you won't have to scrub nearly as hard

to get them off. Just remember to open some windows if you have a lot

of marks.



Bug guts will eat away the finish on your car if not removed quickly!

Use WD-40!



P.S. The basic ingredient is FISH OIL!

 

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Posted by Siegel Reptiles:
"question--should my radiator overflow be filled with red fluid? never noticed either way before. "

Thats the clue. They purged the air out of the cooling system and they needed to add "Toyota Long Life Radiator Coolant" or antifreeze, which is red/pink.

1. The Thermostats in new Toyotas as so highly QCeed they never stick open or closed, atleast in the first 20K miles. Not like things were 20 years back.

2. Even with the radiator clogged up 25%, it is plenty large and over designed for the temperatures you ran into. These radiators are designed to to pull a 6000 lb trailer up a 6% slope at 70 miles an hour in 100 degrees F weather. Trust me!

They purged air out of the cooling system, and hosed out some mud, not all of it.

Once the cooling system malfunctions, because of air in there instead of fluid to take the heat out, the ECU tells the A/C to hold off, hence no A/C too!

The free alignment was because they wanted you to be a happy customer.

What I can't figure out is why air gets in there? I've had the exact same thing happen on an '86 Cressida (at 45K miles) and a 05 Corolla at 15K miles about 6 months back.
 

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Or your thermostat simply stuck. Sometimes you can tap on the housing a bit and it will let loose - at least in other vehicles I've done that.

Always look for the simplest solution first. Occam's Razor. It's bitten me many times over the last few decades.

"The principle states that the explanation of any phenomenon should make as few assumptions as possible, eliminating those that make no difference in the observable predictions of the explanatory hypothesis or theory."
 

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Thanks, I've been looking for such a product for a LONG time now. On order

I never go "offroad" in the classic sense, but did pull the little trim cover off. I was VERY surprised to find my rad at least 25% coated with a dirty film. I'm wondering if the salt/sand used on the roads here in winter, when it finally melts, tends to plug up rads?

Never had an issue with other vehicles. No overheating but the temps have only been +40 F. I'm looking forward to getting that wand and properly cleaning the rad and condenser

One thing I will do is apply a product intended for cleaning evaporator coils and condenser coils in the HVAC industry. They're made by Nu Calgon, one product is called Special HD CalClean. It's intended for cleaning heavily soiled outdoor condensers, I do know it readily dissolves dirt from the outdoor A/C condenser at my hobby farm

http://www.nucalgon.com/nucalgon/nu...7B89AFF3734FEE078625643A006B4D8C?OpenDocument

NuCalgon claims the product is safe to use around plastics. Never tried it on a car but for the intended use it works great

NuCalgon also makes a Teflon spray that is intended to protect the coil after cleaning. I've used this on the outside A/C condenser at my hobby farm, it does stay clean much longer and I only have to clean at the start of the cooling season, instead of every month

http://www.nucalgon.com/nucalgon/nu...C53AFFA082356E33862564C6006482A4?OpenDocument

I don't think I have to worry about cleaning just yet, might as well wait until April or even early May. I don't anticipate A/C use at least until May
 

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Hey OneManBanned, just reading all your WD-40 uses, nice, but I got a question...
"Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell)."
How do you sneek up to them to spray them?
I've been at it all day, and still have not hit one.:)
 

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Made my own rad wand.

1 3' pieces of aluminium tude from Lowes/HD/Menards ($3.56), sealed end over with hammer and vice. Drilled 30 small holes in a line. Attached 4' of water hose and connector to my garden hose (.99C).

Removed top black cover and voila!

I also had the bottom 3rd of the rad blocked, this must have been since March07, and have been running at 186F constantly, even while towing. I washed out the rad a week ago and my temperature still gets to 186F and sometimes dips to 182F. There is more than enough cooling capacity!
 

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Made my own rad wand.

1 3' pieces of aluminium tude from Lowes/HD/Menards ($3.56), sealed end over with hammer and vice. Drilled 30 small holes in a line. Attached 4' of water hose and connector to my garden hose (.99C).

Removed top black cover and voila!

I also had the bottom 3rd of the rad blocked, this must have been since March07, and have been running at 186F constantly, even while towing. I washed out the rad a week ago and my temperature still gets to 186F and sometimes dips to 182F. There is more than enough cooling capacity!
I've been running 186F since I I bought it last year. The past two months I've been seeing it range from 186-192F. Not really a big deal right now, but not exactly a trend that I want to continue. Radiator's clean, coolant's good, and the ambient temperature has been low compared to last year. Any idea what's causing this?
 

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I've been running 186F since I I bought it last year. The past two months I've been seeing it range from 186-192F. Not really a big deal right now, but not exactly a trend that I want to continue. Radiator's clean, coolant's good, and the ambient temperature has been low compared to last year. Any idea what's causing this?
I have seen that also, it goes away though. I don't understand why it happens, but it seemed to do it more when the outside temp was cooler? I just wonder if the engine changes some parameters to compensate, maybe timing etc.
 

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I have seen that also, it goes away though. I don't understand why it happens, but it seemed to do it more when the outside temp was cooler? I just wonder if the engine changes some parameters to compensate, maybe timing etc.
I was thinking either mixture or timing. It is something I'm watching pretty closely, though.
 
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