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FoodSaver® Vacuum Sealer, America's #1 Selling Brand of Home Vacuum Packaging Systems

Friend of mine bought two a year back from Costco.
His is an older model, a horizontal one, not the newer upright versions.
It could be this one.
FoodSaver® Vacuum Sealer, America's #1 Selling Brand of Home Vacuum Packaging Systems

What are the advantages to one of these for camping?
I have never used one, but would like to pick up his extra one of get a newer vertical style.

I imagine I could precook some stuff at home and then throw the bags into the ARB fridge?
Can you boil with these type of bags too to heat up your dinner?

Lets say you want to cook up a stroganoff dish at home, then you can bag it, freeze it, then take them camping and simply drop the bag into a pot of water to warm it up?

I am trying to justify the need for one of these for the upcoming camping season next year.

They have a recipe area on the website, and indeed it looks like you can do pasta to boil in the bag later.
FoodSaver® Vacuum Sealer, America's #1 Selling Brand of Home Vacuum Packaging Systems
Pasta Dinner Recipe
Print Recipes

Cooked Pasta – With out sauce.

Cooked spaghetti, angel hair, linguine, noodles, and other flat pastas can be vacuum packaged with FoodSaver® Vacuum Packaging Systems.

Tubular shapes, corkscrews and similar shapes flatten out and are not recommended for vacuum packaging.
Directions:

1. Cook pasta according to package directions.
2. Drain.
3. Rinse thoroughly with cold water and drain very well.
4. For leftover pasta, rinse and drain very well.
5. Loosely fill FoodSaver® Bag so that pasta is no more than 2 inches thick for easier stacking in freezer and faster thawing.
6. Label, vacuum package and freeze for up to 2 years.

Thawing:
Place FoodSaver® Bag on dish and thaw in refrigerator overnight or until thawed.

Reheating Suggestions:
Use thawed pasta, cold, in salads such as Asian noodle salad and pasta primavera salad.
Or, for hot dishes, reheat frozen or thawed pasta using one of the methods below.

Stovetop Directions:

1. Immerse sealed bag of frozen or thawed pasta in boiling water.
2. Turn bag several times while heating.
3. Boil until pasta is soft and hot.
4. Or, remove pasta from bag and place directly into boiling water for 2-3 minutes.
5. Drain and serve with your favorite sauce.
This looks like a good model here, the one featured in their index page.
FoodSaver® Vacuum Sealing System with Exclusive SmartSeal? Technology - T000-18004-001

 

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Corey,
Not really an expert on the subject - the real advantage is being able to vacuum seal food. so that it can be preserved longer (especially good against freezer burn).
It is fairly thick material that is heat resistant, so that you could re-heat a meal/portion in boiling water. Never tried it on the road - but does work at home.
Other advantage is that make the portion sizes easy to pack - compact for the fridge.
 

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Yes you can boil in the bags. I have had one for years and love it.
You can also marinate, season before hand, and that cuts down on the things you need to take along.
Ratfink
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info guys.

I think one of these would do it then for prepacking food ahead of time, then just drop it on the camp stove in some boiling water.

Less space and wastes with taking boxes of pasta or other food along.
 

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Hey Corey......ask FJDave who is always voting down everyone's threads.......
 

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Discussion Starter #6

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I have one of these. I use it to freeze stuff with. Works great for home storage of food items. It is a great machine to have. Just don't microwave plastic bags. Things can go a little toxic on ya. LOL
 

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These are great for saving leftovers, marinating steaks/chops/whatever, freezing ready-made meals for rainy days. I sometimes make extra omelets and freeze them this way for boil-in-bag breakfasts in a pinch.

Bags are dishwasher safe and reusable as well!
 

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Thats how we pack our meals when we are on a dog sledding or snow shoeing trips. The food stays frozen. Just boil up a pot of water reheat, make coffee, tea, whatever with the boild water. Eat right of the bag.
 

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I have one of these vacuum sealers. Not the upright one, I bought it about a year ago. It works great!

The local store had a great sale on Porterhouse steaks on labor day weekend. $3.99 per pound. I bought up a bunch and cut them into smaller steaks and then sealed them with the vacuum sealer.

The problem with freezing meat is that as the meat slowly gets cold from the freezer, large ice crystals form in the meat that puncture the cell walls. When you thaw the meat, you see a lot of juice come out. The trick is, the faster you freeze it, the smaller the ice crystals will be, and the jucier your steak will be. So.....I went into work and brought home a dewar of liquid nitrogen. Flash froze the steaks and all is good!

Then I made instant ice cream with the rest of the liquid nitrogen. Then I froze various things around the apartment and eneded up hammering in a nail with a frozen banana. weeeeee!!!!!

RH
 

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Lets say you want to cook up a stroganoff dish at home, then you can bag it, freeze it, then take them camping and simply drop the bag into a pot of water to warm it up?
Yes.

I'm lazy and don't have a camp frig yet, so I just bring along freeze dried backpacker food, instant oatmeal and instant beverages (coffee, tea, Tang and Kool Aid) and soups, which only requires the addition of boiling water. Actually, even after I get my frig, I'm only planning to carry beer & Coke in it. You can get 10 six packs in an Engle MT45, which should last me at leat a week or 2. :rofl:

But, if you MUST have "real" food while camping, the Food Saver is the best way to package it. You can precook dishes and just boil to reheat. Certain recipes work better than others, so some pretesting at home is required.

Braised or slow cooked dishes like stroganoff, tuna cassarole, and stews, as well as precooked ham, sausages, scrambled eggs, chicken, pasta, tomatoes, mac & cheese, beans, soups, rice, potatos & slightly cooked fresh veggies (or canned) reheat well in boiling water. However, steaks & chops tend to overcook when reheated, so you may have to seal & freeze and/or frig them raw and grill them on site instead.
 

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I've also got a Food Saver. Great device!

I buy a side of beef every year, and vacuum pack the meat to store in the freezer. Removing the oxygen from the package prevents freezer burn, and assists in freezing the meat solidly. When I'm ready to cook, I can take a package of meat from the freezer, soak it in warm water for twenty minutes or so, and the meat is just as fresh as when it was initially frozen.

Here's a tip for liquids and/or soft foods (like spaghetti, stroganoff, soups, etc.): Use a small tupperware-type storage container (one that will fit within the freezer bag), or use a zip-lock freezer bag, and slightly pre-freeze the food. Once the liquidy food is somewhat frozen, you can then dump the contents into a Food Saver vacuum bag and seal it without a massive liquid mess.

Edit: Same technique works for breads, too. Slightly freezing keeps the bread from crushing when activating the vacuum. Plus, you can control when to seal the bag, so right at the crush point hit the Seal button to prevent crushing...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Great tips folk's!
Some food I will want to cook up "live" on the camp stove such as eggs, nothing like the smell of cooking breakfast when camping.

But a lot of the time consuming dinner stuff sounds great.
Pre-cook at home, freeze, then put in the ARB fridge to slowly thaw.
 

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Another idea is put some matches along with other survival stuff vacume seal them and put them in your pack.

My wife and I use ours alot for the Costco runs.... As much as I love steaks I just cant eat 12 and one sitting.
 

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I just saw the Food Saver at Costco yesterday.

I'm going to go back today and buy one but I'm going to keep in it the box until I actually decide to use it and, if I don't, I can just return it for a refund. ;)

Update 10/23/08:

I went back to Costco today, but the cost of the FoodSaver plus an extra box of bags was going to cost about $200! :eek: Decided I didn't "need" it enough to pay that price, especially since I don't have a frig yet. I'll reconsider the purchase when I actually get a frig.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My friend also tells me they have plastic containers too that you hook a hose to from the machine to suck out air.
That would work too for food for the trail you want to carry in your fridge or cooler.
 

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I guess my thoughts are I am not on the road that long to worry about it so freezer bags work for me :)

also part of my camping is the cooking outdoors and over fires if I can or making a fun breakfast on the griddle

I can see how they can be handy but I also have a hard time swallowing the price :)
 
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