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Discussion Starter #1
Not just Toyota, but every other automaker out there! Why can't anyone make a fuel gauge that actually shows the amount that is REALLY in the tank!:thinkerg: I mean it seems like I can drive for 100 miles without hardly budging the needle when I'm arount 3/4 of a tank. Then when I'm around a 1/2 tank, the darn thing seems to lose a 1/8 of a tank in 30 miles!:cowfrown: I know I'm a picky SOB, but c'mon-we can send a man to the moon...:lol:
 

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welcome to computers and programing. It's all perceptual programing to make people think they are getting good mileage. GM did this back in the early 90s i think with the digital dash boards the were all LCD displays. They had to reduce the accuracy of the gas gauge cause people thought they were getting poor mileage when the gauge dropped from full to one gallon less in a short amount of time.
 

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I hate how it does that. And then the low-fuel light comes on and I fill up....yet I still had 4-5 gallons in the tank. I've just gotten used to it. :lol:
 

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Everything so far accurately describes my gauge. Once I hit about 1/2 tank, look out, it'll be falling fast. I get the fuel light with 4-5 gallons left, but my mileage has gotten so low that I really do start looking for a station. What we really need are tanks bigger than 19 gallons. 30 would be more like it.
 

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this happens because of design limitations actually.

if you were to take the pump housing/sending unit assembly out you'd see that the arm on the unit is not long enough to ride an arc that would cover the entire height of the fuel tank. thus in order to show the "important" part of the fuel info, namely the end of the tank, they mount the assembly low in the tank and sacrifice the high volume accuracy for the low.

if they were to try to make the arm long enough to exactly detail the entire amount of fuel from full to empty, there's a good chance the assemblies wouldn't fit in the tanks or at the very least won't be serviceable without removing the tank
 

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Everything so far accurately describes my gauge. Once I hit about 1/2 tank, look out, it'll be falling fast. I get the fuel light with 4-5 gallons left, but my mileage has gotten so low that I really do start looking for a station. What we really need are tanks bigger than 19 gallons. 30 would be more like it.
Check out this link: http://www.fjcruiserforums.com/forums/misc-technical-discussion/127417-w5wis-auxillary-fuel-tank.html

Doesn't help your fuel mileage, but lets you go further... :cheers:

cheers,

dale
 

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Discussion Starter #7
this happens because of design limitations actually.

if you were to take the pump housing/sending unit assembly out you'd see that the arm on the unit is not long enough to ride an arc that would cover the entire height of the fuel tank. thus in order to show the "important" part of the fuel info, namely the end of the tank, they mount the assembly low in the tank and sacrifice the high volume accuracy for the low.

if they were to try to make the arm long enough to exactly detail the entire amount of fuel from full to empty, there's a good chance the assemblies wouldn't fit in the tanks or at the very least won't be serviceable without removing the tank
Exactally! Design flaws are what I'm talking about. I bet a B747 does not use a 'float guage", my guess is that there are diferent ways to get the job done, but the auto industry is standing by antiquated, out of date crap, due to costs I'm sure!
 

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Many aircraft do use float gauges. I tell you what, I have turned wrenches on some pretty advanced acft, and you know what the most common problem across the board is? Fuel indication. It's not just the automotive industry. It's just a hard system to keep working right. In fact most of the time, the automotive industry has the most advanced technology when it comes to indication. The thing about aircraft production is you only want to put the tried and true technology into the macine, because if you use new technology that no one knowd the sensitivities of, and it stops working, you cant just pull over to the side of the road. Automotive industry takes advantage of the fact that cars (should be) are grounded, and can implement the new technologies. Many aircraft you think would have that super advanced technology actually are still useing technologies from around the 60's or even 50's, in some form or another. Some times even older.

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Discussion Starter #9
Many aircraft do use float gauges. I tell you what, I have turned wrenches on some pretty advanced acft, and you know what the most common problem across the board is? Fuel indication. It's not just the automotive industry. It's just a hard system to keep working right.

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WOW! I di not know that! My mind is now thinking: To hell with the "better mouse trap", I'm gonna be rich when I invent a gauge that REALLY works!:rofl:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Its not a "flaw" if its work as designed.
Ok, so it's designed to be a peice of crap??? Then they need a NEW design!!!That's what I have been trying to say. I understand why the current system does not work as it should-so a new design is in order.
 
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