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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Nothing earth-shattering here but figured I would share how things went for me. Lots of folks have done this one and more are probably in need of replacing the pump and filter. With 196K on my 08 I was way way over due. I went into this thinking it would be a PITA but it really wasnt too difficult.

I had already identified the fuel pump and filter as on the short list of needing preventative maintenance and purchased the UDR kit (DW 255lph pump). I was planning on doing the job next weekend due to a buddy being free to help me. Turns out Murphy decided I needed to do it before then and on my own.

Symptoms leading up to the replacement: I replaced my A/F, O2 and MAF sensors about 6 months ago due to a part throttle hesitation issue. Ever since then the FJ had been running normal until a week or so ago and then nearly the same part throttle hesitation issues came back. This time they were far more consistent, but I still couldn’t really make it happen or make it go away when it did happen. Generally, it would hesitate around 2000RPM and the engine speed and acceleration was not proportional to the amount the gas pedal was pressed. Eventually it would surge up in RPM and build some power – not unlike when the back two barrels of a carb opened up too late. Eventually the revs would shoot up and power would build but it was not the normal power delivery curve at all. Same as my hesitation issue due to A/F and O2 sensors - no codes were generated at all. I really thought the computer kept a closer eye on things.

Troubleshooting steps: I tried using the Bluetooth OBD2 scanner that I bought for the A/F & O2 sensor troubleshooting but nothing obvious jumped out at me. This is most likely because I didn’t know what the readings should be, I really needed a known good baseline and didn’t have one. All the tests came back good/green but there was still an obvious issue with the hesitations. I did find one post that helped me narrow down the most likely culprit.

The fuel pump runs off a lower voltage for normal starting and running and switches to a higher voltage on demand. For troubleshooting, you can unplug the fuel pump resistor, jumper the two pins in the harness then go for a test ride to see if things get better. This bypasses the fuel pump resistor and makes the fuel pump operate at a higher than normal voltage and if the FJ drives better then there may be issues with the pump/filter or fuel pump resistor. Pics of the fuel pump resistor are in the link above. There is a white two pin socketed connection from the wiring harness that plugs into the fuel pump resistor (looks like a heat sink on the driver’s side fender well). When I jumpered the fuel pump resistor my hesitation issues went away almost entirely. Since I already had the UDR fuel pump and in line filter parts in hand, this was enough troubleshooting for me to believe I had found a source of the hesitation problems.

Specialty tools I used:
Harbor freight ATV lift
1500 lb. Capacity ATV/Motorcycle Lift

Strap wrench (mine was a Craftsman but looked just like this one)
https://www.amazon.com/BO13010-Constrictor-Aluminum-Strap-Wrench/dp/B0011E4QU4

Dremel (for the UDR pump housing mods)

Paint pen (to mark the top of the fuel filter housing and ring orientation)

Normal tools I used:
I didn’t keep a comprehensive list but mostly 10-14mm, a short socket extension, couple small screwdrivers, needle nose pliers (for the gas tank pivot pin cotter pins), channel locks, WD40.

Tank removal:
I followed the UDR directions for the most part for the whole procedure. I did also reference the FSM section for fuel tank removal and used their steps for removing the back seats to access the panel under the drivers side rear seat to unplug the harness from the tank before lowering it. I had a quarter tank of gas left and was working alone so I didn’t want to mess with unplugging stuff while the tank was partially suspended. The rest of this is just notes or comments on various parts of those instructions.

There are only 5 hose connections to the tank and a ground strap: 2 fuel lines in front of the tank, the fill line and two vents in the back of the tank. The fill line and the small vent line are easy to unhook. The larger vent line can be unhooked at the tank or at the canister under the cargo area. It was easier for me to unhook the large vent line at the canister than it was at the tank so that’s what I did. It’s an odd connector that you have to squeeze the bottom of, push in and then pull off. Sounds easy but it took me several tries to unlock it and I am still not sure exactly how I did it.

The two fuel lines on the front side of the tank are the high pressure (larger) and low pressure (smaller) lines. Definitely follow the directions to pull the relay and release the line pressure before messing with these. The instructions call these connections “quick connect” fittings. Note that they are not called “quick disconnect” fittings /forums/images/FJCruiser2/smilies/tango_face_grin.png I struggled with these for a long time and wasn’t getting anywhere. I wasn’t even sure if I was attempting to release them properly. I called UDR and they suggested hosing the connectors down with WD40 to loosen them up and that did the trick. After letting the WD40 soak in I was able to squeeze the sides (the black housing not the colored tab) with some channel locks on the middle setting and the colored tab started to pop out some. After the colored tab popped out some I was able to coax it all the way out with a screw driver.

One thing to note is the connectors are color coded blue for high pressure and white for low pressure but the connectors at the top of the pump housing is not the same colors. For me the high pressure line was blue at the connector and green at the tank. The low pressure line was white at the connector and orange at the tank. I have seen other pictures online and I don’t think these are standardized colors at all so you may find different colors. The bigger line connector is high pressure and the fitting at the top of the tank closest to the drive shaft is also the high pressure line.

Once the 5 lines are disconnected, you can slide the ATV jack under the tank and raise it up until it just touches the tank. Removing the two bolts and the two pins holding the tank straps is pretty simple. Lowering the tank and removing it from out under the FJ needs the FJ to be jacked up pretty high. I was able to jack up the rear axle and the drivers side frame rail near the limits of the OEM bottle jack and that was good enough with some moving the ATV jack to get the tank out easy enough.

With the tank out and following the UDR instructions the pump swap is pretty straight forward. Use the strap wrench to loosen the retaining ring. Once its moving you can do it by hand. Be sure to make a visual inspection of the inside of your tank and drain/clean out any crap you find. Pro tip: DO NOT OVERLOOK THE LITTLE METAL CLIP THAT HOLDS THE NEW STRAINER TO THE BOTTOM OF THE NEW PUMP. If you don’t see this part in the bag and misinterpret the UDR instructions, then notice the clip in the unused fuel pump parts during clean up, you will be doing this all over again. Or so I heard….from a friend…..


Tank install:
Once the new pump is in the housing and back in the tank, putting everything back together is straight forward and goes faster than taking it all out. Installing the new inline fuel filter is simple and just requires some routing of the new hose and a couple zip ties to keep everything in place. Don’t forget to plug in the connector on the top of the tank (remember the rear seats you removed when you started) and replace the fuel pump relay before connecting the battery and starting the engine. For the first start I rolled the key to “ON” and let the pump run until it stopped – this was about 2 times longer run time than normal it seemed like. The very first start I let it crank longer than normal and just when I let it stop the engine was starting up. I let the starter cool for about 30 seconds and tried again – she fired up like normal and settled into a faster than normal idle quickly.

I shut it all down and checked for fuel leaks and didn’t find any. I started it back up and watched underneath for several minutes for any signs of leaks. Once I felt like it was good I went for a drive around the block and it was obvious things were much better. I have been driving it daily for three days now and everything has been great. It took a bit for the computer to settle in and optimize everything, but it really runs smooth again and the power delivery is back to normal. Actually, it’s better than normal because it had slowly been degrading due to a clogged filter and I didn’t pickup on the changes until they became dramatic. With the new pump and filter in place now it’s obvious this should have been done much much sooner.

Took me 6 hours total but I wasted a lot of time on the "quick connect" fuel lines and working slow in general. I could do it again in half the time I am pretty sure. It's really not that difficult, just seems like it will be.

Edited to add - Just replaced the fuel pressure regulator (12/19) and it made a noticeable difference in the power delivery. It was ok before but after replacement it is definitely running stronger. If you are swapping out the fuel pump on a high mileage FJ its worth considering I think. You could just measure the line pressure and see if you are in specs for the fuel pressure but I didnt have the gauges to test mine. Knowing what I know now I would have done the pressure regulator about the same time as the new fuel pump.
 

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There is a youtube video of two whacky guys cutting the floor under the back seat. It would have been a good idea to put an access panel there.
 

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Good write up thanks. I wonder what is the recommended timeframe for replacing OEM fuel pump?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good write up thanks. I wonder what is the recommended timeframe for replacing OEM fuel pump?
In my research, I found people that reported clogged fuel filters in as little as 30K. I am pretty sure OEM my pump was still working fine when I pulled it at 196K but the filter was solid black and was the primary factor contributing to the hesitation issues I was seeing. Toyota should have given the US market an inline fuel filter like they did for the other markets instead of a non-serviceable filter buried in the tank as part of an expensive fuel pump~filter~sending unit assembly. Knowing what I know now, I'd have made the UDR replacement/upgrade at 100K and called it good instead of waiting for trouble codes or problems to appear. I am still surprised I have never once seen a code on my FJ for anything, ever.

I like the idea of having a properly sized access panel over the pump so it could be removed from the top but I am not willing to hack up things like in the video above. If someone came out with a kit that had a larger sized access panel w/gasket and a template for cutting then I would have no issues making the mod.

I really don't like those quick connect fuel line connections and would like to determine a way to eliminate them and just use some high-quality hose and clamps instead.
 

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must depend a lot on what gets into the tank, because when I dropped mine at about 90k miles (to adjust the float arm to improve the fuel gauge accuracy - highly recommended), the filter was white like new

Regarding the quick connect clamps: you can cut the hose and use 2 normal hose clamps and a piece of properly sized metal tube to slip inside the two ends, to join the hose ends with. As you'd pointed out above, those OE clamps were really for manufacturing efficiency when new. Just take note of the pressure in some of those hoses and clamp accordingly.


N
 

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Regarding the quick connect clamps: you can cut the hose and use 2 normal hose clamps and a piece of properly sized metal tube to slip inside the two ends, to join the hose ends with. As you'd pointed out above, those OE clamps were really for manufacturing efficiency when new. Just take note of the pressure in some of those hoses and clamp accordingly.N
I highly recommend NOT doing this. The factory connectors are solid and safe. Most manufacturers use these style connections or some form of them and there are very few problems. Worm clamps and steel fuel line and rubber hose are far more dangerous with a pressurized fuel system. If you're worried then get some skid plates to protect the underside of the truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I highly recommend NOT doing this. The factory connectors are solid and safe. Most manufacturers use these style connections or some form of them and there are very few problems. Worm clamps and steel fuel line and rubber hose are far more dangerous with a pressurized fuel system. If you're worried then get some skid plates to protect the underside of the truck.
Thanks for the warning. I think I will hold off on this for now and perhaps investigate safer methods, maybe some aircraft style threaded connectors or something. You are correct about the factory connectors, they work ok once you get used to them and they have some WD40 on them. I'm still not crazy about them but I did have to un hook them again this past weekend and they went a lot faster this time around.

With that said, I have no problems letting my failures serve as a learning point for others so allow me to share a pic :grin



Dont overlook the clip that holds the strainer onto the bottom of the new fuel pump. I did and I had to drop the tank and remove the pump all over again just to resolve my oversight. I did't see the clip in the parts and by the time I found it and realized what had happened it was too late to do anyting about it for a week.

Good news #1 : After a week of in town driving the strainer did not fall off the pump and was still attached when I removed the pump
Good news #2 : I found SS zipties on amazon with fast delivery (you have to cut the old one to remove the pump and need a new one to secure things when done)
Good news #3 : I was able to drop the tank, remove the pump, fix my oversight and put it all back together again right at the 3 hour mark.
Bad news: My GF still hasn't stopped giving me sh!t about this :rofl:

Lesson learned #1 : Inventory all the parts before starting the work
Lesson learned #2 : Having spare SS zipties on hand is a good idea if you ever have to dive into the pump assembly. I gorilla taped a couple to the top of the tank as emergency spares incase I ever have to pull the pump again just to make sure there are always some if needed.
 

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Having spare SS zipties on hand is a good idea if you ever have to dive into the pump assembly. I gorilla taped a couple to the top of the tank as emergency spares incase I ever have to pull the pump again just to make sure there are always some if needed.
That is smart thinking. Someday you're going to get to do a massive I-told-you-so dance (if only to yourself) when you get under there and they're there waiting for you!
 

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So I decided to enlarge the access hole under the seat to access the fuel pump. It was fairly easy with a drill and a sawzall. It took about 3 minutes to remove the seats. The guys in the video had the correct measurements for the whole and the sawzall cut through like butter. I took my time removing the 5 plug wire harness careful not to pull on the wires, you have to push on the plastic release tab and pull from the bottom. I used masking tape to cover all the connecters just to keep any dust away. I was careful with the sawzall on the left hand side to make sure the blade didn't cut the fuel lines. When everything was ready I used a can of compressed air to clean the dust around the tank, on mine there was not a whole lot of loose dirt. It took me less than an hour total with repeated trips into the house.
 

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Update. At 103,000 miles my strainer is black. I also replaced the actual fuel filter with the Beck Arnley Fuel Filter. The problem is the BA Filter attached fuel line is to short and it's a real pain trying to get it off, I ended up cutting it off and I had to cut the factory line off the old filter as it was sealed on. So using the BA Filter you will need another plastic fuel delivery line about 13 inches long to replace the factory one, the BA is only about 9 inches long. I'm glad I did this because I cut the old filter in half with a sawzall and it was extremely dirty.
 

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So I decided to enlarge the access hole under the seat to access the fuel pump. It was fairly easy with a drill and a sawzall. It took about 3 minutes to remove the seats. The guys in the video had the correct measurements for the whole and the sawzall cut through like butter. I took my time removing the 5 plug wire harness careful not to pull on the wires, you have to push on the plastic release tab and pull from the bottom. I used masking tape to cover all the connecters just to keep any dust away. I was careful with the sawzall on the left hand side to make sure the blade didn't cut the fuel lines. When everything was ready I used a can of compressed air to clean the dust around the tank, on mine there was not a whole lot of loose dirt. It took me less than an hour total with repeated trips into the house.
I need to replace my Fuel Pump and I think I am going to go this route. I am not sure if I should buy the pump only or get the entire thing with the housing so I can get a new filter included as well. I appreciate you posting pics, that along with the crazy guys' video makes this seem really doable. I am going to take a day to get the necessary parts and figure out if I need just the pump for $350 or the whole thing for $470.
 

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So before I begin this process of replacing my fuel pump, I think I should make a post to see if I am missing anything super important before I begin. My experience level is intermediate at best. I took a few years of auto shop in H.S. and learned a lot about working on cars in that class. We worked mainly on older hot rods and VW's that were in the shop so my knowledge never really translated to newer cars. I have done a lot of wiring work and replaced the sound systems on several vehicles. I have replaced alternators and belts on my previous F-150's. But this is my first Toyota vehicle and I am not extremely confident. I have a manual transmission 2007 FJ with just under 130K miles on it.

Problem: While approaching a stop sign (in neutral) my engine died and the check engine light came on. I tried starting and the engine just kept turning over but would not start. So I figure wither no gas or no spark. I had a friend come over with a code reader but the engine would not give an error code even though the check engine light was on. Maybe this was because it would not start. So we decided to pull the fuel line just in front of the fuel filter that is under the hood. When we pulled this line and tried to start the engine no gas was coming out. We then used starter spray directly into the intake to see if the engine would start, and it did. Because it started with starter spray and there is no fuel coming out of the fuel line I am assuming it is a bad fuel pump. Please correct me if I am wrong on this or if there is anything else I should check before pulling the fuel pump.

My Solution: I am going to try and use the hack(above) where people cut the floor panel to increase the size of the access hole under the rear seat. It looks fairly simple and I do not really feel like I have the ability to drop the tank on my own without running into major hangups and headaches.

My Questions: Which fuel pump should I buy? Looking online I see two basic variants, one with the plastic housing included and one that appears to be just the pump that I would install into the housing. The difference in price is about $120-$150 so I am not sure what option to get. If it fairly simple to replace the pump inside the original housing then that's what I would prefer, but I don't want to do that if there are complicated procedures or if I will need ti zip tie anything in place. I'm assuming one just has to be installed inside the original housing and the other just replaces everything. Has anyone replaced their fuel filter have any advice about which type of pump or which brand to get that will work best. I am not really interested in getting something top of the line, just a simple replacement that will work as well as the original. Any advice would be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I would do the Underdog Racing replacement pump and filter mod. You end up with a easily replaced fuel filter that's out side the tank on the frame rails and the filter can be sourced from Napa easily.

The OEM setup doesn't really have a filter per se, there is a mesh bag filter at the bottom of the OEM pump and that's it. Yes with the aftermarket solution you end up zip tying an universal style pump to the OEM housing but it's a simple thing to do and as I mentioned above, if you pick up some spare stainless zip ties ahead of
it won't ever be an issue if you need to dive into the pump assembly again.

I like the idea of a larger opening to service things from the top but not at the expense of having a large hole open to the outside though. Don't need another way for bugs and critters to get inside the cabin. Can't imagine the noise, dust, etc. is nice either. If someone was handy with some simple sheet metal fabrication it would probably be pretty easy to craft a new removable panel to cover the larger access opening and that would be something I would want to do if I went that route.

Good luck! Either way you go it's a pretty easy thing to do. Some of the OEM line connections are finicky but a shot of wd40 seems to make them easier to work with.
 

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I would do the Underdog Racing replacement pump and filter mod. You end up with a easily replaced fuel filter that's out side the tank on the frame rails and the filter can be sourced from Napa easily.

The OEM setup doesn't really have a filter per se, there is a mesh bag filter at the bottom of the OEM pump and that's it. Yes with the aftermarket solution you end up zip tying an universal style pump to the OEM housing but it's a simple thing to do and as I mentioned above, if you pick up some spare stainless zip ties ahead of
it won't ever be an issue if you need to dive into the pump assembly again.

I like the idea of a larger opening to service things from the top but not at the expense of having a large hole open to the outside though. Don't need another way for bugs and critters to get inside the cabin. Can't imagine the noise, dust, etc. is nice either. If someone was handy with some simple sheet metal fabrication it would probably be pretty easy to craft a new removable panel to cover the larger access opening and that would be something I would want to do if I went that route.

Good luck! Either way you go it's a pretty easy thing to do. Some of the OEM line connections are finicky but a shot of wd40 seems to make them easier to work with.
Would this option be something I could do without having to open up the tank and remove the old fuel pump? Would I just be attaching an aftermarket electric fuel pump outside the tank on the frame rails with self drilling screws? This sounds much simpler if that is the case, but where would I source power from? Is there a link to that write up you can share with me?
 

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I would do the Underdog Racing replacement pump and filter mod. You end up with a easily replaced fuel filter that's out side the tank on the frame rails and the filter can be sourced from Napa easily.

The OEM setup doesn't really have a filter per se, there is a mesh bag filter at the bottom of the OEM pump and that's it. Yes with the aftermarket solution you end up zip tying an universal style pump to the OEM housing but it's a simple thing to do and as I mentioned above, if you pick up some spare stainless zip ties ahead of
it won't ever be an issue if you need to dive into the pump assembly again.

I like the idea of a larger opening to service things from the top but not at the expense of having a large hole open to the outside though. Don't need another way for bugs and critters to get inside the cabin. Can't imagine the noise, dust, etc. is nice either. If someone was handy with some simple sheet metal fabrication it would probably be pretty easy to craft a new removable panel to cover the larger access opening and that would be something I would want to do if I went that route.

Good luck! Either way you go it's a pretty easy thing to do. Some of the OEM line connections are finicky but a shot of wd40 seems to make them easier to work with.
Sorry, I misread your reply. I see the filter is outside the tank but the pump still sits inside the original housing. I think I will be fine using a couple small zip ties to keep everything secure, especially if it saves me a hundred bucks or more. I really appreciate your original write-up and your reply. I hate giving people money for things I can fix myself, so it's posts like yours that inspire me to get out there and do it myself. Will let you know how it all works out. Probably have to wait a day or two for the pump to arrive, I will check out the UDR option as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
If you're going to try to roll your own replacement pump and filter kit instead of buying the kit from Underdog be sure you are using will the correct high pressure stuff. The fuel lines to install the filter by the frame rails are not cheap nor readily available from my local parts stores. Same with the SS zip ties, they were easily found on Amazon though. I forget how long they need to be but it's longer than you would think.

Be safe and good luck!
 

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If you're going to try to roll your own replacement pump and filter kit instead of buying the kit from Underdog be sure you are using will the correct high pressure stuff. The fuel lines to install the filter by the frame rails are not cheap nor readily available from my local parts stores. Same with the SS zip ties, they were easily found on Amazon though. I forget how long they need to be but it's longer than you would think.

Be safe and good luck!
I just looked at the underdog kit and it looks fantastic. Thank you for sharing. It looks like that kit for $169 comes with a pump and new filter so that is less than half of what they were charging at auto zone for a weaker fuel pump. Will definitely use this one instead, especially if you are saying everything works and fits for you. This is why I love these forums because I can learn from your experience. I used F-150 forums for years before buying my FJ and I was able to fix almost anything that came up. This is just the first time I've had any problems with my FJ since I bought it. Thank you again and I appreciate your replies. It sounds like you were able to pull your tank by yourself just fine, which is so impressive. I don't have a lift or axle stands so I would have to buy all that stuff and then learn the hard parts myself. The cutting a hole hack doesn't really frighten me and I feel that I can pull it off much easier. Although I was going to just drop the tank and buy the required tools if it came down to it.
 

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If you're going to try to roll your own replacement pump and filter kit instead of buying the kit from Underdog be sure you are using will the correct high pressure stuff. The fuel lines to install the filter by the frame rails are not cheap nor readily available from my local parts stores. Same with the SS zip ties, they were easily found on Amazon though. I forget how long they need to be but it's longer than you would think.

Be safe and good luck!
Sorry for asking so many questions but if I get the kit from UDR that will have all the fuel lines I need to install the filter outside the tank without having to buy any additional fuel lines correct? Then I would only need to grab some small stainless steel zip ties from amazon that are fairly long. This is because I the original pump is zip tied in and I will have to cut those zip ties and then restrap the new pump in it's place? The options I see for stainless zip ties are like 4", 6", 8" or 12" any advice on which one is likely correct? I truly appreciate your insight.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The UDR kit has every part you need. You may want some spare zipties in case you ever want to pull the pump out again later. Just measure the ones in the kit and buy the same ones off Amazon. Done. Now you have spares for later.

If the tank is nearly empty when you do your work, you don't really need the lift, especially if you have a buddy to help with that part. Getting it out does need some jack stands but good ones from Northern Tool aren't too expensive, will last a lifetime and if you're going to be doing your own work then you will need them again. It's a good investment
 
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