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I am going to sub to this thread, as I first heard about this from Wayne after having my duel battery setup installed.

I am using the Painless solenoid that came with the kit.

 

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Great info guys, I will be getting a Hell Roaring isolators with the Optima batteries. I plan on adding a winch also this winter. I'm going to write Santa a letter right now.
 

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If I do the 2 optima batteries has anyone considered trying to make them fit side by side whhere the current battery sits? Only I think they would have to be turned with a custom tray what do ya think?
 

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Well, I will start by saying I am biased because I use and sell solenoid-based systems. And there is good reason for that - Mil-spec solenoids don't fail in the field - I have not had one fail, out of the 1,500-2,000+ units we'veinstalled over the last 24 years. I cannot say the same regarding diode-based isolator systems. I am not aware of any high-vibration / extreme environment systems that relay on isolators, despite the fact they are solid state. As you can see by the finned housings, they need to dissapate heat, and heat related failures are more likely with an isolator than a solenoid.

I have no experience with the isolator / combiner mentioned in this thread - it is probably a fine product, and my commentary is not directed at that company or it's stuff. Just that the comparison chart on their site is also biased, as they are most likely using a standard Ford-type stater solenoid to compare to, as opposed to a much tougher, longer duty cycle Mil-Spec solenoid used in better systems...For example, there are solenoids that automatically protect the secondary battery from discharging in the event of an alternator failure, and it's easy to set up a non-auto solenoid to be switchable for the same protection manually, avoiding the diode-based circuits completely.
 

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Thanks for that link That is exactly what I was talking about I thought his description said the right side, but it was right in front of the fuse box. I wanted to save the passenger side for an onboard welder and my CAI
thanks again
Don
 

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Looks like he had to cut away a piece of the front support to fit dual batteries. I wonder if there are smaller batteries that could be used in that location.
 

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Well, I will start by saying I am biased because I use and sell solenoid-based systems. And there is good reason for that - Mil-spec solenoids don't fail in the field - I have not had one fail, out of the 1,500-2,000+ units we'veinstalled over the last 24 years. I cannot say the same regarding diode-based isolator systems. I am not aware of any high-vibration / extreme environment systems that relay on isolators, despite the fact they are solid state. As you can see by the finned housings, they need to dissapate heat, and heat related failures are more likely with an isolator than a solenoid.

I have no experience with the isolator / combiner mentioned in this thread - it is probably a fine product, and my commentary is not directed at that company or it's stuff. Just that the comparison chart on their site is also biased, as they are most likely using a standard Ford-type stater solenoid to compare to, as opposed to a much tougher, longer duty cycle Mil-Spec solenoid used in better systems...For example, there are solenoids that automatically protect the secondary battery from discharging in the event of an alternator failure, and it's easy to set up a non-auto solenoid to be switchable for the same protection manually, avoiding the diode-based circuits completely.

Larry, I'd venture to say you're basing your opinion on silicon rectifier technology which does get hot and requires large heatsinks. Newer MOSFET technology can handle upwards of 1,000 amps, no moving parts, and no heatsinks. We've been selling devices to the military that REPLACE mil-spec mechanical relays specifically because they aren't as reliable when switching high current in a high vibration environment. I agree with your suggestion that specs can be grossly biased and self serving, however I can tell you having designed, patented, and building high-current solid-state isolators and relays, in various applications, solid-state methods of switching and controlling power have evolved dramatically. If you go stricly by the laws of probability, losing the moving parts in a high-current, high-vibration environment has HUGE advantages over their mechanical counterparts....and as prices come down and they become used in a wider variety of applications, I think you may slowly change your opinion about solid-state isolators/relays.
 

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Larry, I'd venture to say you're basing your opinion on silicon rectifier technology which does get hot and requires large heatsinks. Newer MOSFET technology can handle upwards of 1,000 amps, no moving parts, and no heatsinks. We've been selling devices to the military that REPLACE mil-spec mechanical relays specifically because they aren't as reliable when switching high current in a high vibration environment. I agree with your suggestion that specs can be grossly biased and self serving, however I can tell you having designed, patented, and building high-current solid-state isolators and relays, in various applications, solid-state methods of switching and controlling power have evolved dramatically. If you go stricly by the laws of probability, losing the moving parts in a high-current, high-vibration environment has HUGE advantages over their mechanical counterparts....and as prices come down and they become used in a wider variety of applications, I think you may slowly change your opinion about solid-state isolators/relays.
Thank you for the info - I would definitely be interested in testing the unit. We use mos-fet controllers for other electronic systems with good results, and no reason to think it would be any different on a moving vehicle... While I feel the comparison on the site wasn't completely fair, I do stand corrected on the unit itself, as I didn't notice any reference to MosFet technology on the chart (probably my old, biased eyesight :huh: ).
 
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