Toyota FJ Cruiser Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Picked up a set of predator step bars to mount on each side of the FJ and I notice that the body bolt holes is all rusted and strip. What are my option to be able to get these step bars mounted? Do I have to drill holes up into the body and bolt it inside my door panels?
1128580
1128581
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,319 Posts
Anyway you can run a tap in there and clean out the threads? If not drill it out and use the next size thread bigger to rethread the hole. Hope this helps :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
What is the size bolt for the body mount? If I drill the holes and rethread will it be strong enough to hold the step bar?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,639 Posts
Original thread size is M8X1.25 (8mm diameter X 1.25 thread pitch).

The best approach would be to try to clean out as much corrosion as possible using a .38 or 9mm caliber brass or stainless steel bore brush (gun cleaning), then using a new 8X1.25 tap to 'find' the original thread start and chase the threads, using plenty of lubricant and backing the tap out every 1/2 turn.

The nuts you are trying to re-tap are 'weld-nuts', spot welded to the inner face of the frame rails. If you apply too much force during thread-chasing (or during drilling and re-tapping), you will break them free from the frame and then you have a far more difficult problem to deal with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
992 Posts
Those look like chicken [email protected] weld nuts or whatever they are called. There isn’t much meat on those things. Those things are a Toyota curse. The ones that hold on my skid plates I welded some 1/4” flat stock and threatened that. You can buy the tool and inserts and pop new ones back in but looking at that rust it looks like whatever you do is not going to be simple to do right


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
The above comments are all worth a shot. I would spend some time cleaning / rust removal of that frame.There are plenty of products that will help. Rust never sleeps Neil Young
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,960 Posts
sadly that rust looks pretty terminal (if the whole rocker is that bad), putting on side steps would be the least of your worries at that point

By the way, there are some side steps that mount directly to the frame rails (not Toyota accessory, but aftermarket). I've seen them (no idea who the maker is/was, though).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Original thread size is M8X1.25 (8mm diameter X 1.25 thread pitch).

The best approach would be to try to clean out as much corrosion as possible using a .38 or 9mm caliber brass or stainless steel bore brush (gun cleaning), then using a new 8X1.25 tap to 'find' the original thread start and chase the threads, using plenty of lubricant and backing the tap out every 1/2 turn.

The nuts you are trying to re-tap are 'weld-nuts', spot welded to the inner face of the frame rails. If you apply too much force during thread-chasing (or during drilling and re-tapping), you will break them free from the frame and then you have a far more difficult problem to deal with.
Thanks, I try the tap method and was able to rethread the bolt hole. It's still hold up strong. What type bolt should I use stainless steel and washer + washer lock?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,639 Posts
Thanks, I try the tap method and was able to rethread the bolt hole. It's still hold up strong. What type bolt should I use stainless steel and washer + washer lock?
If you are only mounting step bars (not rock rails or sliders), then you can use 300-series (18-8) stainless-steel fasteners or carbon-steel bolts. In either case, use plenty of antiseize paste in the threads to prevent further corrosion of the nuts, and to protect the bolts if you use carbon-steel fasteners. Flatwashers + lockwashers would be recommended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
If you are only mounting step bars (not rock rails or sliders), then you can use 300-series (18-8) stainless-steel fasteners or carbon-steel bolts. In either case, use plenty of antiseize paste in the threads to prevent further corrosion of the nuts, and to protect the bolts if you use carbon-steel fasteners. Flatwashers + lockwashers would be recommended.
Thanks for your help.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top