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I was going to rotate my tires last night. I jacked up the right rear but couldn't get the wheel off as it's stuck! Any ideas why or how to get it loose?
Thanks,
 

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sometimes crap can get wedged in between the hub of wheel try kicking it or use a 2 by 4 and give it a good wack
 

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If you have a rubber mallet, hit the inside of the rim and turn the wheel to hit it in different spots. It will come off.
 

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LOL... you forgot to remove the lug nuts!:rofl:
Get a dead blow hammer and hit it against the inside on the rim edge or tire and the out side .. Its from the Hub an wheel either slitely rust or oxidizing depending on what wheels yur running
 

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Don't forget to add some anti-sieze compound on the rim where it contacts the rotor after you get it off and before you re-install it. It will prevent this from happening next.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
LOL... you forgot to remove the lug nuts!:rofl:
Yea! After I couldn''t get it off, I actually checked to make sure I didn't leave a lug nut in place!

I tried kicking last night, but I will try the hammer later today. I'm running 17" OEM alloys.

Thanks for your help.:clap:
 

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I was going to rotate my tires last night. I jacked up the right rear but couldn't get the wheel off as it's stuck! Any ideas why or how to get it loose?
Thanks,
Aluminum rims will do that after a while. The steel from the hub seizes to the aluminum. My F-150 does that sometimes. The Best way to break it free is not to beat the sh*t out of it but to loosen all the lugs but don't take them off. Then put the wheel on the ground and turn the steering wheel if it's the front tire, or shake the vehicle if it's the rear wheel. The weight of the vehicle should break it loose. Just don't back the lugs off too much so it damages the studs when it breaks free. Good luck! :bigthumb:
 

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WD 40 or any penetrating oil. Spray where the wheel and the face of the hub meet. Then go have a coffee or a beer (time dependant). Give it 10-20 minutes and it will come off in your hands.
 

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Just a word of advice. I wouldn't recommend ANY kind of anti-seize or penetrating oil on lugs or on the brake rotor. Lubricants will work their way down onto the brake rotor surface and reduce your brakes clamping power. Sometimes to the point of what feels like no brakes! I've seen it happen. On lugs, they will allow the lug to work loose over time. Not a good idea. If you ever had to use something on a rotor or lug, make sure you remove the residue with brake cleaner.
 

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Bang on it.:cheers:

Just a bit of anti-seize during the install will help to get back apart.
 

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Lower the rig back down onto the tire just enough to pop it loose.

DEWFPO
 

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If you're going to bang on it, put a piece of 2x4 in front it and hit the piece of wood instead. Much less likely to cause any damage. DEWFPO's advice is what I would do first. Make sure you have jack stands in case it goes too far.
 

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Just a word of advice. I wouldn't recommend ANY kind of anti-seize or penetrating oil on lugs or on the brake rotor. Lubricants will work their way down onto the brake rotor surface and reduce your brakes clamping power. Sometimes to the point of what feels like no brakes! I've seen it happen. On lugs, they will allow the lug to work loose over time. Not a good idea. If you ever had to use something on a rotor or lug, make sure you remove the residue with brake cleaner.
Not to mention the torque spec for the lug nuts is dry. You add a lubricant to the lug studs and that torque dry actually increases. With all the studs breaking at the dry torque spec. I wouldn't add anything to the studs. A little axle grease on the face of the rotor where the hub of the wheel touchs is okay if you put it on thin. I just rub it on with my fingers and only use enough to put a thin layer on it. Anything else is asking for trouble. I wouldn't put ANY anti-seize on the rotor/hubs/lug studs. That stuff is impossible not to get all over yourself and anything you touch. Your next tire rotation could have your toolbox, hands and bench looking like the silver surfer.
 

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Another quick bit of advice. If you read the back of the bottle, anti-sieze is rated for temperatures of 1600 degress f. It will not run anywhere. Also, I have used all of the methods mentioned above. Usually the dead blow on the inside of the wheel or tire works fine, if it won't then try the loosening the lugnuts method. Once you have the wheels off to rotate them, absolutely apply anti-sieze to the surface where the wheel and rotor come together. Don't get carried away with it, a little bit goes a long way. Also there will be a spot where the rotor fits over the end of the axle. Usually the center opening of the wheel will fit around this as well. This typically is where the corrosion is that prevents the wheel from being removed. Inspect the aluminum wheels when you get them off to see where the hang up was, and make sure you get anti-sieze there. The next time, they will come right off.
 

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I rotated mine yesterday and had the same problem.

Mallet wouldn't do anything. I had to seriously donkey kick them to break them loose.

I was about to lower them back down as someone else mentioned when they finally came off. Never had that happen to any other vehicle I've had.
 
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