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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a week ago I took the plunge. Typically I'm a tent man. I prefer the smaller 1-2 person tents, basically mini bomb shelters. However, after my last tent tanked, I did a little research and I came across a few tents. One of which was a hammock/tent made by Hennessey that I ended up purchasing.

I was a bit reluctant at first to be honest. I've never had good luck with hammocks, whether it be me flipping out of them, the awkward way to get in/out of them. The "Midnight Sag", my knots slipping, the binding of the knots, the bugs, the rain ... ect. However, after two solid nights of bug free, the best sleep I've ever had in a tent/air mattress I'm happy to report I give the hammock two thumbs up!:bigthumb::bigthumb:

Like I said, it kept the bugs out. It was a great night's rest. Quick quick setup(make sure to buy the snakeskins), it's super light to travel with if your a back packer,. The build quality is excellent. In warmer weather it's cool and comfy, and with a good pad and a good sleeping bag I can see how it could be used in much colder temperatures. It's kind of a pain getting in and out given once your in your somewhat sealed in, but it's just something to get used of. It's got hooks and a ridgeline up top to keep the bug net out of your face(pretty ingenious). The hooks are ideal for hanging a light, maybe hooking your backpack on one, a book ... ect. It's incredibly sturdy, I had a bit of wind one night and actually the gentle rocking motion put me to sleep ....

I guess what I'm saying is if you haven't ever looked at a hammock to camp in, I'd recommend it, especially in the rocky mountains where I tested it :)




The neat thing, is you are suppose to lay a different way than you would originally in a hammock, and thus you can sleep straight, or with a slight curve, on your stomach ... in a fetal position ... ect ...



Anyways, I'm not associated with them in any way, but figured I'd share a great experience/product with the rest of you ...
 

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Formerly FJ_Marine
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Very cool!

I'm planning an long hiking trip in a few years and have been thinking about the best/lightest possiblility for shelter. My original idea was to just pack my bivy sack but after looking at this I may reconsider.

A couple of Q's:

1. How much (if you dont mind saying)
2. Weight and size packed
 

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I've messed with those a bit. I didn't find it as comfortable as you but it was pretty dang good for a 'hammock'. The idea and execution are pretty good and I appreciate the utility for some people. I'm not one to like confinement so I prefer a bigger tent (I'm not a backpacker...by a longshot!). I don't even like the small one or 'two' person backpacking tents. The swaying in the breeze aspect is very cool, though. Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Very cool!

I'm planning an long hiking trip in a few years and have been thinking about the best/lightest possiblility for shelter. My original idea was to just pack my bivy sack but after looking at this I may reconsider.

A couple of Q's:

1. How much (if you dont mind saying)
2. Weight and size packed
Hey FJ_MARINE! I saw you won member of the month. Congrats. I'll be around here shortly to give you props:bigthumb:

It was 130$ Which, isn't bad when considering size, and function and practically all the goodies you get with it(It's a shelter, it's a chair ect ...). If you order through the hennessey website it comes with free snakeskins which will run another 20 bucks. Absolutely worth it in my opinion.

As far as the weight and size packed. I bought the expedition, however, they have an ultralight backpackers version that the weight is 1 lb. 15 oz according to their website. It rangers from 1-3 pounds packed though depending on model. Regards to size packed, it comes in a small drawstring bag, and it's rather small. I'll see if I can post the size of the bag a little later, but it's small, and designed for, backpackers.

Here is some more info:
HENNESSY HAMMOCKS: Model Comparison Chart: sizes, weights, prices, fabrics, and features

Very cool I would never have never thought of this !! great Idea.. What is the weight limit??? I only ask cuz I am a large person..

(ok ok some peole say I am fat):)
hehe. Depends on the model. The version I got supports up to 250lbs, which is way more than enough for me. However, they have models that go up to 300+ lbs, and also, that's just the recommended weight. I think I was reading somewhere that the material used is rated up to 6000lbs per square inch or some other ridiculous figure(don't quote me on that, but it's pretty sturdy).
 

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I have one and have been using it for cycle touring as a quick shelter. It's the bomb......get one if you don't have one. Super easy set up and ya don't have to sleep in a tent with your buddy, unless of course she's your sweetie! :bandit:
 

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I've looked at these in the past and my biggest problem is that I backpack in a lot of areas (such as the deserts of southern Utah) that don't have trees, and you really need trees to makes this work... I guess if there are no trees it sort of becomes a bivy sack...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've looked at these in the past and my biggest problem is that I backpack in a lot of areas (such as the deserts of southern Utah) that don't have trees, and you really need trees to makes this work... I guess if there are no trees it sort of becomes a bivy sack...
I'm sure you could set it up though, whether it between rocks(using rock climbing equipment) ect ...

But your right, it is campsite specific I'd imagine ...
 

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looked at some of these but sometimes you end up in an area where the trees are either to far apart, to small, or not present in the area. I would go with a light Mountain Hardwear one person tent. I have one and love it and its the perfect size and weight. Plus it doesnt require trees :p But I would def. rock the hammock in the right area!
 
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I tried the Hennessy ULTRALITE BACKPACKER A-SYM with skins about 4 years ago and felt it was waaay more pleasant to sleep in than in a traditional tent with sleeping pad and bag. Back support is great. I put a total of about 10 nights in it and returned it as a few problems cropped up. It caused some knee pain to sleep in the slight banana position because it just slightly overextends the knee joint. This would likely not be a problem for those who haven't had knee problems in the past. Also, I'm not claustrophobic but I felt a bit vulnerable in it (more so when solo bp'ing in bear country). If the fly's on, there's no way to easily look out if you hear a noise without actually getting out first. As another poster stated, they are just a bivy when used above treeline or where trees are few and far between. Lastly, they can feel really cold on your backside in windy or cool conditions if there's no insulating pad between you and the silnylon.
Nowadays for backpacking, I use a poncho-tarp that's significantly lighter and doubles as a waterproof poncho:
Six Moon Designs - Ultralight Backpacking Gear

Still, the Hennessey products are great and have a place in the gear arsenal.
 
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