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Just purchased a 2010 black cherry FJ, (pictures soon to follow) and I would like to treat my vehicle with a coat of ANTI-RUST sealant.

Has anyone tried this? Is there a "recommended" brand to use?

Thank you in advance.
 

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The dealership should have sprayed undercoating under it. If they didn't, rustoleum makes an undercoating that'll take care of it.
 

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Before you apply something like rustoleum to the underside, what would be the best way to clean the undercarriage of dirt/grease/etc.? Would taking the FJ to a fancy car wash, or using some sort of cleaner at home be better? If at home, what is good for getting such stuff off the underside (preferably as non-toxic as possible)?
 

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Before you apply something like rustoleum to the underside, what would be the best way to clean the undercarriage of dirt/grease/etc.? Would taking the FJ to a fancy car wash, or using some sort of cleaner at home be better? If at home, what is good for getting such stuff off the underside (preferably as non-toxic as possible)?
I used a 5% solution of simple green thru a high pressure steam cleaner...I then used a automotive undercoating. Not a sign of rust in two yrs.
 

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Just purchased a 2010 black cherry FJ,....
There are no 2010 black cherries - that color was discontinued after the 2007 model.
 

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Go to west marine and get corrosion spray. It holds up to regular salt water immersion on my boat, so I'd imagine it will do well on a car
 

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My only suggestion is to NOT use anything that uses the word "sealant". Use something oil based like Rustcheck or maybe Fluid Film. Whatever you use you don't want it to hold moisture in.
 

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Mine got rusted , but i repaint it again :bigthumb:
 

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My only suggestion is to NOT use anything that uses the word "sealant". Use something oil based like Rustcheck or maybe Fluid Film. Whatever you use you don't want it to hold moisture in.
The stuff for marine use dries to a abrasion resistant waxy film.
 

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Hello, I Live in Montreal (lot of snow and LOT of salt).

We use here a mix spacial formulated oil that probably could be available in similar service providers in USA.

I request to apply this product every year:
The MRP Product (Products | Metropolitan Rust Proofing | Rust prevention treatment)

Some people does not like the smell the very first days, and other people says that oil will damage some rubber parts. In 4 years with my FJ, no problem at all and no rust at all.

Regards
Freddy
 

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My FJ is an '08 from Long Island/CT, and has the usual amount of surface rust underneath. Interestingly, the body shell looks like new, only the frame, chassis, suspension and fasteners looked like hell.
I studied all possible options and did the following:

1) flush out frame rails with liberal amounts of hot, soapy water (jack up one end and spray through all of the holes until the water runs completely clear, then repeat going the other way). Get all of the dirt and mud out of there so you can treat/coat the steel.

2) spray Ospho phosphate treatment inside and outside of the rails, and on all surface rust (flood inside the rails through all of the available openings to make sure to contact all inside surfaces).

Ospho is available by the quart at ACE hardware, or by the gallon from your local paint supplier (I got mine from Sherwin Williams). Apply it with a cheap, plastic garden sprayer (if you use a metal spray gun the Ospho will tend to etch away the steel inside its nozzle, so that is not recommended, for the good of your spray gun). Note that phosphate treatment will adversely react with zinc coatings, so don't get it on anything that is zinc coated and is in otherwise good shape. All of my fasteners underneath were in crummy shape so this didn't matter, but two nuts up high in the engine room were and they turned all tarnished and crusty, as did the zinc coating on the handles of my jack stands.

Otherwise, the Ospho treatment turned almost all of the red surface rust (iron oxide) into a hard, black iron phosphate (good!). Some areas needed a second treatment the next day (wherever the surface rust is especially deep), and I used a small hand spritzer filled with Ospho to get at those spots.

The Ospho wouldn't react with painted steel, plastics or rubbers, so I did very minimal masking. Clean up was a simple wash, afterwards. Use a tarp because it will leave white spots on the driveway.

All rust proofing is a series of layers, each one protecting the one beneath. I went over the top of the Ospho treatment with Fluid Film.

3) apply Fluid Film with the simple spray gun they sell in their kit. They say you can use an airless sprayer with a Latex tip, but I found that made way too much of a cloud of mist for my taste, so I used the cheap spray gun they provided and it worked great with minimal overspray.

When applying anything which is oily the brakes MUST be masked. I jacked up, removed the wheels and taped trash bags over the brakes.

As you can see, the results are very encouraging (note the "after" pictures).

When it goes on, it smells like a sheep (lanolin based, so it is not harmful to rubber, plastics, paints, your skin), and it, at first, looks a little like old mayonnaise. But, after a day it will turn clear and the whole underside will look black, and be pretty well protected.


Thoughts: after Fluid Film application, it will drip (especially if you made sure to flood the frame rails through all of the available openings to coat all surfaces inside). This will make oily spots on your garage floor. A fair trade, compared to rust. Over time the film will consolidate, and after a few washes / rain storms the dripping will stop.


I figure that the fluid film will need to be re-applied after about 2 years. It was so easy to do that ought to be a pretty simple matter.

When I do open up the doors, rear quarter trim, for other reasons, I'll also coat inside those areas too, but at first simply getting the whole underside coated should be a solid head start on controlling the rust.
 

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After driving my rig through a couple of more winters I realized that merely applying Ospho and Fluid Film is not enough. Red rust kept coming back in some spots.
So, this advice is based on what I’ve learned from MED over the years, and recently on this project: corrosion protection is a matter of layers: each layer protects the one beneath, and helps the one on top of it to stick.

1) remove as much red rust as possible (wire brush the parts in place, or better yet, remove as many parts as possible and sand blast and re-coat separately before re-installation)
2) apply phosphate wash (Sherwin Williams sells Ospho) with a cheap, disposable garden sprayer (note, phosphate will attack zinc plating, so keep away from any fasteners which are still silver colored). The phosphate wash will convert any remaining, microscopic iron-oxide into an inert iron-phosphate. But note it is still reactive and will not last without some kind of covering protection against oxygen and water.
3) note that paint cannot stick to dirty surfaces, so clean, clean, clean with rubbing alcohol, brake cleaner, etc. until the rag comes back clean. If you have FF already on the frame, clean that off with oven cleaner until the surface is ready to accept paint.
4) paint all surfaces with a good quality top coat (something like POR15, for instance, it is epoxy based (I think) which includes UV protection as well as 02 protection)
5) after the top coat of paint is dry, go over that with body wax, unfortunately this isn’t readily available at most auto parts stores as a consumer product, so I buy Amsoil Metal Protectant, which is sort of like “Cosmoline”, and seems very similar to the body wax Toyota uses on line. It will dry to a semi-hard, non-tacky surface. Use a long straw with a 360deg spray nozzle to tread inside of frame rails, suspension arms, etc.
6) once dry, go over that with a lightweight liquid rust protectant like Fluid Film, it is lanolin based, so is OK to get on anything (on rubber is OK), but don’t get on brakes (obviously), or tires (slippery). FF is great stuff, but it does tend to rinse off, so should be re-applied each fall

Note that FF can be applied with a bulk sprayer, from a gallon can, the first time, then after that first big application each year a single rattle can and some long straws, and about 1 hour of time is enough to re-do the whole underside. For it I don’t even bother to mask or do any cleanup, simply sweep of a comfortable part of the driveway, slide around on a piece of cardboard, wear dirty clothes and then let the weather clean off any overspray/drips from the driveway when done.

Any time anything like this is done, go back and make SURE all of the drain holes are still clear (not clogged with undercoating) to prevent pooled water causing corrosion after all.

Whenever any fastener is removed, use some anti-seize on the threads before re-installation (note, when using it, which is a lubricant, reduce torque -40%, keep a record and re-check at that new torque value after a few 1000 miles just to be sure).

Hope this helps,
Norm
 

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POR 15 is UV sensitive and requires a top coat
POR 15 will not stop/prevent rusting unless it is in direct contact with base material. Painting it over existing paint/treatments is like setting a $100 bill on fire - IMO

I would follow norms details above but sub in Rustoleum for POR-15.
 
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