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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
OK, I just finished my first 2011 FJ oil change at just over 1,200 miles. Not being familiar with the FJ or its cartridge-style oil filter, it was an ordeal, but the first time is the hardest. Now that I know how to do it, it will not be so bad in the future. For anyone who has not done it yet, here is how, with pictures attached.

Step 1 - Remove the front skid plate. It is held on with four 12 mm bolts. You will need a socket wrench and a short extension. Break all four bolts loose at the locations shown in the attached pic. Toyota had torqued these to some ridiculous torque, but I finally busted them loose. The front of the skid plate has hooks to support it so take out the front two bolts first. Then support the skid plate as you remove the two rear bolts. Lower the back of the skid plate to the ground, and the front hooks should then release so you can remove it and set it aside.

Step 2- Remove the oval shaped metal plate covering the engine oil pan and drain plug. It has two 12 mm bolts. See attached picture.

Step 3 - Remove the metal bottom from the filter assembly using a 3/8" drive socket wrench extension. A little oil will drip out so you may want to cover it with a paper towel. See attached picture with the brass threads exposed.

Step 4 - Attach a foot of 5/8" fuel line to the plastic filter draining tool. Push the draining tool into the filter hard, and the oil will run out through the hose. When you pull out the draining tool, the small O ring should come out with it. If not, use your fingers to remove it - do not use any type of metal object because you may damage the sealing surface of the filter.

Step 5 - Use a 65 mm 14 flat cap style oil filter wrench to unscrew the plastic filter housing. Toyota had torqued this filter in place so hard I could not believe it. I am not sure if the 65 mm is too small or if mine is just a crummy tool, but I had to tap it onto the filter by force - very, very tight fit requiring a lot of force to put it on and take it off - be careful. It worked though. Difficult to get on and off the filter. Brand: Performance Tool part #W54074 from Advance Auto Parts - $5.99. See pic of the metal filter housing that remains attached to the engine.

Step 6 - Remove the old filter element, remove the old large O ring at the top of the plastic filter housing (fingers only!), lubricate the new O ring with clean oil, and place it on the plastic filter housing. Insert the new filter element. Clean everything up as best you can - it gets messy - 0W20 is thin and runs everywhere. Reinstall the plastic filter housing with the new filter element inside. I am not accustomed to tightening O ring seals and plastic parts until they bottom out, but that's the way Toyota did it, so that's the way I put it back. I did not tighten it to the insane torque of the factory though. I tightened it firmly after it bottomed out, but not insanely hard. No leaks - yeah!

Step 7 - Lubricate the small O ring and reinstall the metal filter housing bottom with the new O ring behind it using a 3/8" socket extension. Again, it bottomed out, and I just tightened it firmly after it bottomed out, and I have no leaks.

Step 8 - Remove the oil pan drain bolt with a 14 mm socket. I wasn't prepared for the torrent of oil released by my FJ - my pan was about to overflow. Note to self: get bigger oil drain pan.

Step 9 - Do whatever it takes to get the fiber drain plug washer off. That thing was stuck on there so hard I was almost thinking it was part of the metal drain pan. A wooden dowel and a whack knocked it loose without damaging the sealing surface. I used a ribbed (for my pleasure) nylon washer that I hope will not stick like that. No leaks - yeah!

Step 10 - Put in 6.4 quarts of Mobil-1 0W20 oil. Geez, the Japanese shure like to torque stuff - I could barely get the oil filler cap off!

Step 11 - Start the engine and check for leaks. If there are none, reinstall the cover over the oil drain pan. Any reason not to just leave this off? Ideas? The oil pan would still be well protected.

Step 12 - Reinstall the front skid plate. Let it hang by the front two metal tabs as you put in one of the rear bolts. Don't tighten the bolts until you have all four of them in because it takes some moving around to get all four holes aligned.

Repeat every 5,000 miles - I don't care if Toyota does say 10,000 is OK - I am not going that long.

Note: at 1,200 miles the oil was much more dirty than I expected. It wasn't jet black, but it was very dirty. A close inspection of the used filter element revealed several flecks of metal in each of the filter pleats. That's just what was visibile to the eye - who knows how much microscopic metal was stuck in it?

It could be psychological, but I swear the engine is quieter than I ever have heard it at idle after the oil change???

OK everyone with a 2011 - go change your oil with confidence. I hope this saves everyone some time and effort.

See second part of this post for the rest of the pics and a little additional information.

-FJ Florida-
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Moderator, I am sure a lot of people over the next year buying 2011 FJ's will want to access this information. Can it be made into a sticky or something?

The rest of the pics are attached.

If you are in a pinch and temporarily unable to get a genuine Toyota filter for some reason, WIX 57173 seems to be decent quality (filter material seems not as thick, but has about 8 more pleats than Toyota) and it fits until you can get a genuine Toyota filter.

-FJ Florida-
 

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Had no idea they changed the set up! that sucks. They set up they have on prev years is perfect!
 

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nice writeup

haven't done the 1st oil change on the 2010 yet, but for some reason i thought the oil draining was all done through the plastic nozzle. did not know there was still the pan drain plug. now i hate this cartridge filter setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
nice writeup

haven't done the 1st oil change on the 2010 yet, but for some reason i thought the oil draining was all done through the plastic nozzle. did not know there was still the pan drain plug. now i hate this cartridge filter setup.
It is more work than unscrewing an all-in-one filter and screwing on a new one. Dropping the front skid plate is another PITA that could have been avoided by putting the filter in a more easily accessed location.

At least there is plenty of room to work underneath the FJ. I guess if you have a major engine malfunction, inspecting the filter element for metal particles will show the problem, but wouldn't you find out soon enough anyway?

I also am not really happy that Toyota is using a plastic housing for the filter. Whatever works I guess. I just hope the threads don't strip out. Be careful tightening it I guess. Plastic for something as critical as a pressurized oil filter on a vehicle that a lot of people use off road? Really? Seriously?

-FJ Florida-
 

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Thanks for this write up! i'll see if i can get LCS to add this to the technical articles.

It is more work than unscrewing an all-in-one filter and screwing on a new one. Dropping the front skid plate is another PITA that could have been avoided by putting the filter in a more easily accessed location.

I also am not really happy that Toyota is using a plastic housing for the filter. Whatever works I guess. I just hope the threads don't strip out. Be careful tightening it I guess. Plastic for something as critical as a pressurized oil filter on a vehicle that a lot of people use off road? Really? Seriously?

-FJ Florida-
Even more a PITA for folks with heavy skids like budbuilts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Even more a PITA for folks with heavy skids like budbuilts.
Yes, at least the factory skid plate has the two metal tabs in the front to help support the front while you get one of the rear bolts in to support it. Not sure if the aftermarkets have these tabs. Even so, I am going to cut a 2x4 to support the skid plate while I get the bolts back in it. Anything to make this process easier.

-FJ Florida-
 

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This thread is now in the How-To technical articles thanks to LandCruiserSteve.
 

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Had no idea they changed the set up! that sucks. They set up they have on prev years is perfect!
I agree with both statements. I have done my firs 1500 oil change and for 20 years of doing this my self it was the worst experience. You have no way to avoid some mess and it takes much more effort. Who in right mind could create a design to remove a skid plate every oil change? I did not see cartridge-type filter design at least 50 years. When I did my oil change, I felt like I went back to 50-th on a Time Machine!

I do not like it not only because of this. Most important, in my opinion, this design does not allow reliable sealing between filter and housing. Seal surface on the filter is quite hard and thin, and may be not perfectly flat and parallel to the housing surface, meaning some oil will bypass filter. Also, if you have small metal particles in the cup, it is nearly impossible to clean. I can not imagine any oil change stations thech or dialer would do this. This design definitely offers less protection to the filter including, that low positioned filter is not good for off-roaders, and can be damaged even behind not very strong stock skid plate on a trail.

I was completely sold on Toyota's perfect top spin-on oil filter design. If I new they changed it to buttom cartridge, I would think many times whether to buy 2009 model is a better option. Now I already decided use only TRD Oil filters. It has better, more rigid construction with frame and much better, thicker O-rings from red silicon to seal gap between filter and housing.

I already told my opinion to my dealer, but I think it will stay there. I really would like Toyota to know how we all (owners and I think Thechs as well) not happy about this change.
 

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Moderator, I am sure a lot of people over the next year buying 2011 FJ's will want to access this information. Can it be made into a sticky or something?

The rest of the pics are attached.

If you are in a pinch and temporarily unable to get a genuine Toyota filter for some reason, WIX 57173 seems to be decent quality (filter material seems not as thick, but has about 8 more pleats than Toyota) and it fits until you can get a genuine Toyota filter.

-FJ Florida-
To add, I just replaced my oil for the first time on my 2011. Instructions came in handy, thanks FJ Florida. I've changed cartridge style filters before, so it wasn't to difficult.

I used the following TRD filter (PT# PTR43-00079) instead of the stock filter, $15 at the dealer along withe 6.4q of 0-20W Mobile 1. The engine oil was fairly dirty, but I also live in Arizona; so much more dust... Did not see any metal shavings on the old filter.

The nice thing about the TRD filter, it came with some nice instructions for TQ specs and steps for filter replacement.
 

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As far as early initial oil changes, I would want to see more early used oil analysis before forming an opinion. My '04 Prius, I left the oil in until 5,000 km and it sampled fine.

With my '07 FJ, I was a bit surprised with such new technology, the oil was shot at only 2,500 km. TBN was 0, oil had sheared to a 20 weight, nitration and oxidation was sky high

So I changed it

Toyota has claimed to have changed the motor with the +2010 FJ's. Not sure what it involves, but one thing that would make me stay away is the PITA cartridge oil filter.

I can do an oil change on my FJ in 5 minutes. Almost too easy, certainly the easiest oil change with the exception of that 2000 GMC Sierra with Vortec 5.3 I used to have

Mind you, that GMC burned so much oil from new an oil change was a moot point
 

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Took me less than 45 minutes to change my oil/filter. My first oil change was at 5K, did not do the 1,200 change like most; did not think it was necessary since the car uses synthetic..
 

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Have they increased the oil capacity in the 2010-11s to 6.4 quart?

Nice that they have an extra qt of oil in there! My 08 takes 5.4 qt. :mecry:
 

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Discussion Starter #16

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Discussion Starter #17
I used the following TRD filter (PT# PTR43-00079) instead of the stock filter, $15 at the dealer along with 6.4q of 0-20W Mobile 1.
In the picture, it looks like the primary differences are metal end caps and an extra seal and different filter media. Any other major differences?

I wonder if we ALL should be using this filter. Shouldn't we all be using the best?

-FJ Florida-
 

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yes the 2010 and 2011 fj's engines take 6.4 quarts of oil and came factory filled with 0 W20 Synthetic oil.i love the mighty sound of the engine in the morning.does the 2008 fj's run on Premium gas? the 10's and 11's run on regular,plenty of take off power,so far no complians on my 2011 fj.i love the handling the power,not so much on the gas i get 16 mpg overrall city and highway.love to hear other's comment on their fj
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
I love the mighty sound of the engine in the morning.
So do I as it roars to life.

Does the 2008 fj's run on Premium gas? The 10's and 11's run on regular,plenty of take off power, so far no complians on my 2011 fj.
I read an article somewhere (maybe here) that the FJ has never required premium gas. It was explained like this in what I read: a "research" octane of at least 92 was specified by Toyota.

There are two octane ratings, research octane and motor octane, with research octane being the higher of the two by about 10. We average together the two numbers to get the octane rating that we see on the pump (R+M/2). So, 87 octane was fine according to this article that I read.

Toyota finally updated their statement to stop the confusion. Personally I am using 89 because I seem to get a bit more mileage out of it.

By the way, I found out that all gasolines are not created equal, contrary to what I always had been told. I'll post a new thread on that. In my city, Toyota/Lexus only recognizes 4 brands of gas as "top tier" to prevent deposits, and they aren't who I expected.

-FJ Florida-
 
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