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I'd like to tag on this thread since I have a 2011 and am due for for my first oil change after a full 30k service. I am planning on having my local dealer do the change. So if I may a few questions...

1) (newbie question) Is the oil filter changed with every oil change?

2) I have newly installed RCI skids. If the filter is to be changed do the skids need to come off? Since the skid has the panel I assume you can drain without skid removal but I am unsure if the skid has to come off to change the filer.
1) Yes.
2) If it's got the access panel, just remove the panel, not the whole skid.

The oil change is pretty easy, actually. Even with the newer setup. It's just time consuming.

One thing about the whole canister coming out, make sure you use the little drain tool that comes with the new filter, then it's easier to remove the filter and canister.
 

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Did my first oil change ever, on any car yesterday. I don't think it was too bad once I got all the right tools, specifically the filter housing wrench. The oil drain nut was a PITA to get off though and it didn't have a washer in it. One plus was that I didn't have to jack up the car, I fit right under there.
 

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Did my first oil change ever, on any car yesterday. I don't think it was too bad once I got all the right tools, specifically the filter housing wrench. The oil drain nut was a PITA to get off though and it didn't have a washer in it. One plus was that I didn't have to jack up the car, I fit right under there.
You are referring to the drain bolt on the oil pan, correct? When you removed the drain bolt did you check to see if the washer gasket was stuck to the pan? I have done all the oil changes on my '13 since new and more often than not the washer gasket will stick to the pan after I remove the drain bolt. I just use a plastic scraper to unstick it so I don't scrape up or damage the pan.
 

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(snip) I have done all the oil changes on my '13 since new and more often than not the washer gasket will stick to the pan after I remove the drain bolt. I just use a plastic scraper to unstick it so I don't scrape up or damage the pan.
Why not just leave it stuck to the pan? It's already achieved at good seal at the pan-gasket interface.

Just confirm with a fingernail that it's still in place when you start to screw the drain plug back in.

I usually change the gasket every 5th oil change on my 4Runner, but have never had one leak a single drop of oil.

(I'm talking about the genuine Toyota gasket, a 3-layer composite of hard fiber, aluminum, and hard fiber.)
 

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You are referring to the drain bolt on the oil pan, correct? When you removed the drain bolt did you check to see if the washer gasket was stuck to the pan? I have done all the oil changes on my '13 since new and more often than not the washer gasket will stick to the pan after I remove the drain bolt. I just use a plastic scraper to unstick it so I don't scrape up or damage the pan.
Yes, the drain bolt. It didn't seem to have one at all. I just bought the FJ last year and the guy had just done the oil change so this was my first one. He would take it to Lube n Go. Im thinking they never replaced the washer.
 

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Why not just leave it stuck to the pan? It's already achieved at good seal at the pan-gasket interface.

Just confirm with a fingernail that it's still in place when you start to screw the drain plug back in.

I usually change the gasket every 5th oil change on my 4Runner, but have never had one leak a single drop of oil.

(I'm talking about the genuine Toyota gasket, a 3-layer composite of hard fiber, aluminum, and hard fiber.)
I replace them because I consider them a one-time use part, and they are cheap enough that I don't mind replacing them at every oil change. I have no doubt that they could be reused at least once, and your experience reflects that. It's just my preference to replace it each time for peace of mind.
 

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Thank you for all the information.

Has anyone used the K&N filter? And has anyone replaced the housing with the aluminium one? Thoughts please. Thanks
I just used an aluminum Dorman replacement with the K&N filter media. My first change on this thing as the dealer had the first two years covered. I learned to be patient, and I also didn;t use the drain first method so had a huge mess. Not bad though, it will be easier to do now that I know, and thanks to this thread. I broke the factory plastic housing getting the tool off of it. Didn't care since I was replacing with the aluminum one. Wish'd I'd checked the bottom plug on the new one, just for peace of mind on the rubber o ring, but no leaks so it must be there from Dorman factory just as the bigger outer one is included. One more piece of plastic replaced with metal, win in my book.
 

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I just did an oil change on my 2011, process was really simple (thanks to this thread and the right tools) but now I'm leaking oil out of the filter. It doesn't leak when vehicle is off, only when it's on and it's enough to pool under the vehicle.

Is there a common misstep in the install or issue with these filters to make them leak? Everything buttoned up fine and I replaced all the o-rings with the new OEM filter. Really confused on why it would be leaking.
 

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Can you tell where it is leaking from precisely? My guess is one of the O-rings isn't seated properly.
 

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Can you tell where it is leaking from precisely? My guess is one of the O-rings isn't seated properly.
The large O-ring seats properly when I tighten it but after the engine warms up, a small section of the ring "bows" out and it leaks from there. It's happened twice, so it's still leaking.

Edit: tightening it until you think it will snap is the key. O-ring seated properly and no leaks.
 

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The large O-ring seats properly when I tighten it but after the engine warms up, a small section of the ring "bows" out and it leaks from there. It's happened twice, so it's still leaking.

Edit: tightening it until you think it will snap is the key. O-ring seated properly and no leaks.
If the Big O-ring can "bow" out it's NOT seated correctly..... see attached pic, make sure it's in the correct groove.

Img_9704_small.jpg
 

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The large O-ring seats properly when I tighten it but after the engine warms up, a small section of the ring "bows" out and it leaks from there. It's happened twice, so it's still leaking.

Edit: tightening it until you think it will snap is the key. O-ring seated properly and no leaks.
LimitedEdition -
Nope, there's absolutely no question that you've got your large O-ring in the WRONG location. Correctly assembled O-ring gland seals create a completely leak-proof joint at ZERO tightening torque.

You are at large risk of the O-ring eventually blowing out and dumping all your oil in a very short period of time, potentially resulting in severe engine damage. The filter housing operates at full oil pressure, and the O-ring softens significantly at full engine operating temperature. Just keep in mind that a complete replacement 1GR-FE engine from Toyota is over $15,000.

This O-ring installation error is so common that Toyota is now placing an illustration on the filter box showing the right and wrong way to do it. This is an unusual failure of Toyota's normal "poka-yoke" (mistake-proof) design engineering, with the intent of making it physically impossible to assemble things incorrectly.

If you've torqued the hell out of the housing in an effort to stop the leak, you've probably cut the O-ring, and will have to get a new one and install it in the O-ring groove at the end of the threads, NOT up against the flange.

 

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LimitedEdition -
Nope, there's absolutely no question that you've got your large O-ring in the WRONG location. Correctly assembled O-ring gland seals create a completely leak-proof joint at ZERO tightening torque.

You are at large risk of the O-ring eventually blowing out and dumping all your oil in a very short period of time, resulting in severe engine damage. The filter housing operates at full oil pressure, and the O-ring softens significantly at full engine operating temperature. Just keep in mind that a complete replacement 1GR-FE engine from Toyota is over $15,000.

This O-ring installation error is so common that Toyota is now placing an illustration on the filter box showing the right and wrong way to do it. This is an unusual failure of Toyota's normal "poka-yoke" (mistake-proof) design engineering, with the intent of making it physically impossible to assemble things incorrectly.

If you've torqued the hell out of the housing in an effort to stop the leak, you've probably cut the O-ring, and will have to get a new one and install it in the O-ring groove at the end of the threads, NOT up against the flange.

**** - I think I put the O-right in the slot shown on the right side. Thanks for posting this pic, I didn't see this on my box. I've put about 150 miles on it like it is, no leaks, but I assume that's due to it being torqued to hell and it's bound to fail if I indeed did put the o-ring in the wrong spot.
 

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**** - I think I put the O-right in the slot shown on the right side. Thanks for posting this pic, I didn't see this on my box. I've put about 150 miles on it like it is, no leaks, but I assume that's due to it being torqued to hell and it's bound to fail if I indeed did put the o-ring in the wrong spot.
Personally, I would not drive the vehicle until you've replaced the O-ring, made sure that it's seated in the O-ring groove, and topped up with a half-quart of oil, or whatever is needed to bring the level back to where it should be.

The risk of running the engine for even a very short time with zero oil pressure is just too great.
 

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**** - I think I put the O-right in the slot shown on the right side. Thanks for posting this pic, I didn't see this on my box. I've put about 150 miles on it like it is, no leaks, but I assume that's due to it being torqued to hell and it's bound to fail if I indeed did put the o-ring in the wrong spot.

Good luck getting off that plastic canister now if you really torqued it down. You may just break the plastic in the process. It's only supposed to be torqued down to 25 Nm. I just changed my oil and switched out the plastic cap for the Toyota aluminum one, Part# 15620-31060 (after switching the innards between the 2) and I made sure to torque it to that spec. when I installed it. I also bought a filter wrench that not only has the hex shape at the bottom, but a couple of slots machined in the top of the wrench to engage with those fingers formed at the top of the canister. It's far less likely to slip off when uninstalling or installing it, and for some reason, that canister really likes to stick after it's been on there for awhile. I think that the synthetic oil makes those O-rings really grip when trying to unscrew the canister for an oil change.
 

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Quick question, when using a TRD filter I assume the metal spring loaded screen stays in the plastic filter housing? The TRD filter has a metal screen insert, but you need the spring loaded screen insert in the housing the make the filter seal correctly right?


Thanks
 

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Quick question, when using a TRD filter I assume the metal spring loaded screen stays in the plastic filter housing? The TRD filter has a metal screen insert, but you need the spring loaded screen insert in the housing the make the filter seal correctly right?


Thanks
Pull the paper filter out, drop the TRD in. No changes to the housing.
 

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Quick question, when using a TRD filter I assume the metal spring loaded screen stays in the plastic filter housing? The TRD filter has a metal screen insert, but you need the spring loaded screen insert in the housing the make the filter seal correctly right?


Thanks
If I understand you correctly, the center tube that holds the paper filter must be in there.
I bought the metal housing that fix Lexus and FJ's. I had to swap the center tubes, as there were different sizes.
Worked great!
 
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