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If I understand you correctly, the center tube that holds the paper filter must be in there.
I bought the metal housing that fix Lexus and FJ's. I had to swap the center tubes, as there were different sizes.
Worked great!
The TRD filters have their own metal center tube and the cheaper filters do not. You just drop the TRD filter in over the metal center tube on the filter housing.

I've been thinking about buying the metal housing as well, ~$30 on ebay.
 

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"front skid plate. It is held on with four 12 mm bolts" and "the oval shaped metal plate covering the engine oil pan and drain plug. It has two 12 mm bolts" Where can I buy these four 12 mm bolts & two 12 mm bolts? part number? since I literally broken all four bolts..
 

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"front skid plate. It is held on with four 12 mm bolts" and "the oval shaped metal plate covering the engine oil pan and drain plug. It has two 12 mm bolts" Where can I buy these four 12 mm bolts & two 12 mm bolts? part number? since I literally broken all four bolts..
I believe the part number you are looking for is 90080-11373, and I *think* all 6 are the same. You can get them from any Toyota dealer but have them verify that it is the correct part number.

I order all of my OEM parts from https://parts.autonationtoyotasouthaustin.com/ and just pick them up since they are local.
 

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"front skid plate. It is held on with four 12 mm bolts" and "the oval shaped metal plate covering the engine oil pan and drain plug. It has two 12 mm bolts" Where can I buy these four 12 mm bolts & two 12 mm bolts? part number? since I literally broken all four bolts..


Local hardware store. M8x1.25 pitch. 25mm length. Just needed to do this myself.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
 

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nice writeup

haven't done the 1st oil change on the 2010 yet, but for some reason i thought the oil draining was all done through the plastic nozzle. did not know there was still the pan drain plug. now i hate this cartridge filter setup.
Sorry, I know this is an old thread. But I have to agree 100%. I just did the oil change on my 2013 FJ for the second or third time. And I also did my mom's 2012 Sequoia. They both have the stupid cartridge thing. Well, it's stupid on the bottom. I did an oil change on a 2009 Porsche 911. They use the same cartridge thing, but it's easily accessible via the rear lid for the engine. It's sitting right there, easy to get at, and doesn't leak everywhere. Toyota should take a hint. I also just changed the oil on a mercury outboard, and it had a normal style filter that's screw on/off and it was so much better. I miss those days.:domotwak:
 

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Wow, just did my first since buying this a little over 9K miles ago. The Mercedes stealership did the last oil change. I needed a Cheater Bar to get the oil filter cap off, the wrench I bought at wally world is a POS that kept slipping off. All Skid plate bolts where freaking over tight as was the drain plug.

I think I know whats happening, the people today, lazy millennials, working on our vehicles now use the cordless impact wrenches for everything. when back in the day we used hand wrenches and had the proper feel for torque values.
 

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Just gave my 2010 its 100,000 mile oil change. My, how times have changed. Used to be (back in the olden days :) ), a motor was usually pretty shot at 100K. Whereas this one still doesn't burn a drop that I can tell in 10,000 miles. Actually, the whole vehicle seems tight and new-ish (other than the new car smell being absent) after 9 years and 100K. Kudos, Toyota.
 

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OK, I just finished my first 2011 FJ oil change at just over 1,200 miles. Not being familiar with the FJ or its cartridge-style oil filter, it was an ordeal, but the first time is the hardest. Now that I know how to do it, it will not be so bad in the future. For anyone who has not done it yet, here is how, with pictures attached.

Step 1 - Remove the front skid plate. It is held on with four 12 mm bolts. You will need a socket wrench and a short extension. Break all four bolts loose at the locations shown in the attached pic. Toyota had torqued these to some ridiculous torque, but I finally busted them loose. The front of the skid plate has hooks to support it so take out the front two bolts first. Then support the skid plate as you remove the two rear bolts. Lower the back of the skid plate to the ground, and the front hooks should then release so you can remove it and set it aside.

Step 2- Remove the oval shaped metal plate covering the engine oil pan and drain plug. It has two 12 mm bolts. See attached picture.

Step 3 - Remove the metal bottom from the filter assembly using a 3/8" drive socket wrench extension. A little oil will drip out so you may want to cover it with a paper towel. See attached picture with the brass threads exposed.

Step 4 - Attach a foot of 5/8" fuel line to the plastic filter draining tool. Push the draining tool into the filter hard, and the oil will run out through the hose. When you pull out the draining tool, the small O ring should come out with it. If not, use your fingers to remove it - do not use any type of metal object because you may damage the sealing surface of the filter.

Step 5 - Use a 65 mm 14 flat cap style oil filter wrench to unscrew the plastic filter housing. Toyota had torqued this filter in place so hard I could not believe it. I am not sure if the 65 mm is too small or if mine is just a crummy tool, but I had to tap it onto the filter by force - very, very tight fit requiring a lot of force to put it on and take it off - be careful. It worked though. Difficult to get on and off the filter. Brand: Performance Tool part #W54074 from Advance Auto Parts - $5.99. See pic of the metal filter housing that remains attached to the engine.

Step 6 - Remove the old filter element, remove the old large O ring at the top of the plastic filter housing (fingers only!), lubricate the new O ring with clean oil, and place it on the plastic filter housing. Insert the new filter element. Clean everything up as best you can - it gets messy - 0W20 is thin and runs everywhere. Reinstall the plastic filter housing with the new filter element inside. I am not accustomed to tightening O ring seals and plastic parts until they bottom out, but that's the way Toyota did it, so that's the way I put it back. I did not tighten it to the insane torque of the factory though. I tightened it firmly after it bottomed out, but not insanely hard. No leaks - yeah!

Step 7 - Lubricate the small O ring and reinstall the metal filter housing bottom with the new O ring behind it using a 3/8" socket extension. Again, it bottomed out, and I just tightened it firmly after it bottomed out, and I have no leaks.

Step 8 - Remove the oil pan drain bolt with a 14 mm socket. I wasn't prepared for the torrent of oil released by my FJ - my pan was about to overflow. Note to self: get bigger oil drain pan.

Step 9 - Do whatever it takes to get the fiber drain plug washer off. That thing was stuck on there so hard I was almost thinking it was part of the metal drain pan. A wooden dowel and a whack knocked it loose without damaging the sealing surface. I used a ribbed (for my pleasure) nylon washer that I hope will not stick like that. No leaks - yeah!

Step 10 - Put in 6.4 quarts of Mobil-1 0W20 oil. Geez, the Japanese shure like to torque stuff - I could barely get the oil filler cap off!

Step 11 - Start the engine and check for leaks. If there are none, reinstall the cover over the oil drain pan. Any reason not to just leave this off? Ideas? The oil pan would still be well protected.

Step 12 - Reinstall the front skid plate. Let it hang by the front two metal tabs as you put in one of the rear bolts. Don't tighten the bolts until you have all four of them in because it takes some moving around to get all four holes aligned.

Repeat every 5,000 miles - I don't care if Toyota does say 10,000 is OK - I am not going that long.

Note: at 1,200 miles the oil was much more dirty than I expected. It wasn't jet black, but it was very dirty. A close inspection of the used filter element revealed several flecks of metal in each of the filter pleats. That's just what was visibile to the eye - who knows how much microscopic metal was stuck in it?

It could be psychological, but I swear the engine is quieter than I ever have heard it at idle after the oil change???

OK everyone with a 2011 - go change your oil with confidence. I hope this saves everyone some time and effort.

See second part of this post for the rest of the pics and a little additional information.

-FJ Florida-
the 2010 and newer engine is similar to Lexus and Prado with very noticeable increase in horsepower (260hp) due to twin VVTI. Also has the excellent cyclone pre filter air cleaner. No need to drain the oil from the filter canister from the metal plug on the bottom.. I save time and just remove the assembly carefully knowing that it has residual oil. What takes the longest time is waiting for all the oil to drain from the oil pan.
 

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I replaced my plastic filter housing with a doorman replacement for a tundra (metal). It leaked so I reinstalled the plastic one and just got an rci skid.
 

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If anyone is interested, here is the metal replacement for the plastic canister filter:


And an upgrade for the oil drain plug (plus differentials and T-Case) that they claim work better under high temperature:

 

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I also have this upgrade which makes draining the canister much easier vs. the cheapo plastic thing that comes with a new filter to drain the canister. I got frustrated with the cheap plastic canister drain falling out all the time. I think the cheap plastic thing worked no problem for me like twice

Another great thing about this drain upgrade is the hose so, if you are outside and it's windy the oil won't get all over the place.

Also, have the oil at full engine operating temperature to get the most out and save a bit of time.

 

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I'd also recommend going with the Toyota TRD oil filter. I'm not sure if anyone else is manufacturing a glass/synthetic media filter for the FJ canister or not. If someone knows of another brand, please do post as I would like to know and I'm sure others would also like to know.

1119148
 

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Amsoil has them. Rated for high mileage change intervals.
Thanks! I remember for the longest time the TRD was the only one available so, I bought like 25 of them just in case they stopped making them and since I've been using the TRD filters for a long time now I haven't researched into other manufactures.

Royal Purple (part 20-968) also has one too and almost half the price of Amsoil (part EA15K49). I'm not worried about the price but, definitely want to get the best. The Amsoil and RP both get 98.7% efficiency @20 microns but, RP also publishes that they are 80% efficient at 10 microns. I'm sure the Amsoil is probably the same or better. Either way, whatever anyone chooses they're definitely better than paper element filters.

Anyone still using paper filters should make the switch to glass/synthetic filter on their next oil change!
 

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Thanks for posting alternatives to the TRD filter. I've always hated the cheapo paper filter that usually crushes or deforms once you install the canister and I'd been buying the TRD's from my dealer or here. The price is better on the RP's.
 
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