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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is a guide on how to replace the gas tank straps. I noticed one day while walking up to my FJ that the OE plastic gas tank skid was crooked. It didn't take too long to discover that one of my gas tank straps had broken! It looked to be very corroded, which surprised me a little because how clean I usually keep the underside of the FJ, there isn't a whole lot of rust. I'll get to why I think it broke near the end of these posts. My FJ is a very early March '06 build, so I imagine this could potentially be a more prevalent problem on FJ's in the future. Keep an eye on it!

Initially I researched a little but couldn't find a how-to or any part numbers. This has happened on a few member's FJ's but pretty rarely. The straps and procedure for each are for the most part identical. I'll show you how to do one, it's really simple but while looking for a solution it's nice to have pics and part numbers of everything. It can be done easily with a simple set of hand tools and a jack. Lets get started.

The problem:
Bumper Auto part Automotive wheel system Automotive exterior Rust


My temporary solution :lol:
Automotive tire Auto part Tire Motor vehicle Suspension
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
The permanent fix:
The ratchet strap lasted me 2 weeks until I got parts and time to install them. The new OE part numbers you will want are:

77601-35110 - Front strap
77602-35050 - Rear strap

Which can be found on this diagram and come out to be about $90 before shipping: https://parts.conicellitoyotaofcons...e/fuel-system-cat/fuel-system-components-scat

As it turns out, the rubber fuel tank protectors are included with those part numbers as an assembly. Now, there is a non-oem kit on a few websites for a bit cheaper. I decided to stick OE, they lasted me 11 years after all. If you get an aftermarket variant feel free to let me know and post in this thread, I'm curious what they look like.

Here are what the new parts look like, I decided to just do both while I'm at it.
Auto part Bumper Automotive exterior


First you will want to remove the fuel tank shield retaining strap as noted in the picture below. I have no idea what this thing is actually intended to do but it makes life easier if you remove the 2 nuts from the body side. (circled in blue)
Wire Auto part Electrical wiring Fuel line Automotive fuel system


Then you will want to go ahead and remove the plastic fuel tank shield. There are 4 nuts, 2 are pictured below. Before doing so you will need to carefully remove your method of supporting the tank. (if any) In my case I took off the ratchet strap since my fuel level was practically empty and there wasn't a whole lot of weight.
Auto part Metal


Here is what it looks like fully removed including the retaining strap:
Metal


Once removed, use a jack to support the tank and push it back up a little bit:
Auto part Suspension part Pipe Suspension Exhaust system


Then remove the pin from one side of the strap, located near the center of the vehicle by the driveshaft:
Auto part Automotive exterior Bumper Suspension Metal


Then unbolt the remaining side of the strap, this bolt was a pain for me to remove because how the bracket is constructed it sits in water and mud its whole life. Spraying with WD40 or something better makes a world of difference. You can easily shoot it horizontally inside that welded-on bracket and cover the threads inside the frame.
Auto part Rust


Finally, install the new strap! Exact procedure but reversed, nuthin' to it as I'm sure you are an expert by now. ;) You may need to jack the tank up a bit more to fit the new one on.
Auto part


When you have that strap on, repeat for the other side (if you choose to replace both) and relocate the jack as necessary to support the tank.

Once finished reinstalling the plastic shield, and you've double checked that you bolted on the tank shield retaining wire doohickey, grab a cold one and enjoy your hard, money-saving work! :cheers:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Here is my broken strap. (rearmost) All of that junk is dirt and rusty metal chunks that were found in-between the metal strap and rubber tank protector. It looks like the tank protector is collecting dirt and water between itself and the strap which is accelerating the corrosion in that area.
Metal Tool Cookie cutter Rust


Yep, the metal strap still looks pretty shiny further under the protector:
Rust


So I could see it being beneficial to cut the rubber protector back a few inches or maybe zip tieing it down, couldn't hurt as long as you do it where the tank doesn't rub. I didn't make any modifications to mine however, but will keep an eye on that area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If you couldn't tell from the previous pics, this was the problem area that I will watch for on the new strap:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
@Iconic: I found a broken rear strap as well. I have have a 14'. No corrosion, and I have skid plates.
Hmmm that seems strange! Must've hit the skid offroad? Either that or a shop mechanic decided to hang from it while it was on a lift. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for the post, I am replacing my straps today. Pictures where great.
Glad this post is getting some use. I noticed the rubber isolators like to trap dirt against the strap. My buddy had to replace some on his '08 recently as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Great post on this. I just noticed my plastic cover hanging down and the rear strap is busted. I thought that particular strap just held the plastic cover on. DIdnt realize that was 1 of the 2 tank straps ... yikes!!!! Employing ratchet strap now, and ordering the replacement tank straps. Dang ... every time I think I'm done for a while!!
Nice. My brother's '05 Tundra just broke one too.
 
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