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Hey everyone,

We put together this article to cover some points on what to look for in a winch and how to compare different winches in a real practical way. We wanted to share it with you all here since it is a common question and hear some feed back from what you guys think.
We normally get asked this a lot with our mounts since they are one of the only options that lets you use pretty much any winch, but we figured the info could help out anyone in spirit of fun in the dirt! If there are any suggestions or other questions, let us know! Thanks.

Lucrum Ind.
760-650-7750
Lucrum Industries - Home


What winch do you recommend?

We get asked that question allot here and there is never to short of a way to be able to give a good answer. I have written this article to help explain what to look for in a winch and how the features and differences in winches actually have a practical application.

There are 3 main criteria I look for when it comes to winches, build quality, pulling power and cost. Each of these criteria can play out in different ways so I will break them down one at a time.

Build Quality;
Build quality can be determined by looking at several different aspects of a winch.
Warranty- How long a warranty does it have? The longer and better the warranty the more confidence the manufacturer has in their product and the more protected you will be. Also look at the inclusions in the warranty almost all manufactures rate their electrical and mechanical components separately. A well worded lifetime warranty may look good on the box but if it covers your solenoids or motor for 90 days then it is worthless.
Sealed or not Sealed? Another aspect of build quality is how well the winch is sealed. Take a look at the IP rating of any of the components, the control box, motor, clutch, etc. This has a practical application if you are going to ever take your vehicle in or through water. If you ever go and drive through a river crossing, get stuck in water or have mud build up in your winch, the moisture will eventually get into your electronics and cause rust on internal parts if they are not sealed. The most definitive way to know how well something is sealed is to look for what is called a "IP rating" which stands for "Ingress Protection Rating" and goes from a scale of 0-6 for the first digit and 0-8 for the second digit, i.e. IP67. The highest IP rating you can get is IP68. Any IP rating of 64-66 is not water proof, just splash resistant. IP 67-68 are water proof up to 3 feet. Sometimes finding the IP rating of a winch can be difficult as not many winch manufactures will rate them other than to say "splash resistant" or "sealed solenoids" if this is a name brand and the warranty is good then it is generally ok to trust this BUT if the company claiming the waterproofness of the winch is not a known company I would not trust it unless they claim a IP rating or a long enough warranty.



Clutch and Brake. Believe it or not in my experiences the clutch was always the first part of a winch to fail and maybe in your case as well. The clutch does not even have to break to fail, in fact in most cases it simply gets stuck. One easy way to determine if the winch has a decent clutch is to look at how you operate it. Clutches that use a band type of lever or any plastic parts on the outside you can see are generally a bad idea. The problem comes when you need to take line out of your winch, you can just hit the out button and let the winch slowly unspool but this can take a really long time if you have a slower winch and use up valuable power. Usually the best option is to disengage your clutch by twisting whatever sort of band or handle is on the winch. This can be tricky sometimes as they can stick or jam up from contaminants entering from the outside and making the cams or moving parts inside bind up from not moving regularly. Now if this happens and you are struggling with a plastic handle or a very hard to turn band you will not be able to get the winch to engage and pull you once the cable is hooked up, or even worse, your clutch handle could break or jam all together causing your winch to be a big useless weight on the front of your 4WD with a cable stuck out you can't get back in. Always get a winch with a metal handle that is sealed, the same sealing guidelines we just talked about will cover the handles seals for you to be able to know.


Winches have brakes? Yes they do. Winches must have a break in them to stop the drum from turning letting line out when the power is shut off from the motor. If there was no brake then when winching on a hill, you would just slide back down and be in a dangerous situation. There are several different kinds of brakes on winches but I will stick to the two general kinds you want to have or avoid to make it simpler. Generally most winches have their brake inside of the center of the winch, this works fine but the drawback is that it creates a lot of heat in the spool of the winch which can affect how long the winch can run and the strength of synthetic rope. Winch brakes apply friction to the drum to get it to stop turning when the winch is not moving, the bad part about this is that they still drag on the spool when the winch is working as well thus causing the extra heat. The way most manufactures have come up with a solution for this is to use a style of brake that mounts on the side of the winch as opposed to being inside the winch. These types of breaks usually can be noticed by the extra stepped down casing on the side of the winch next to the clutch. You can also see them externally on older but high-quality styled winches like the Warn 8274 that uses a open ratcheting style of brake. In general any style of brake outside of the drum is better than a brake in the drum. As I mentioned before the higher temperatures can effect a synthetic rope as they are much more sensitive to high temperatures than steel cables. If you run a synthetic line a external brake should be more of a priority than if you are planning to run a steel cable.




To read the rest of the article that covers, Pulling Power, Power Consumption and how to figure how far you can actually pull click here Lucrum Industries - Home

Thanks so much!
 

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Hey Mods. Need help with having our pics open on the threads. Tried everything we can think of. Thanks in advance.
Lucrum.
 

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Hey Mods. Need help with having our pics open on the threads. Tried everything we can think of. Thanks in advance.
Lucrum.
Pics are showing for me.
 

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I see the Images too.... Looks all good !... :bigthumb:
 

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I see boobies.....and pics!
 

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:rofl:....
 

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IP67. The highest IP rating you can get is IP68. Any IP rating of 64-66 is not water proof, just splash resistant. IP 67-68 are water proof up to 3 feet.
It is important to note that the IP rating applies when the product is new. A 5 year old winch may not hold up to water the way a new one will. Its best to clean/lube o-rings if you're concerned about water ingress.
 
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