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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Community,
I just moved to NJ and I was wondering if undercoating the FJ with nhoilundercoating product is a good idea.
I am open to any other suggestions - the car lived in Texas for 12 years and it's basically rust free.
Thanks!
Riccardo
 

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So I’m from Ohio and as such, there’s a ton of salt used on the roads every winter. I recently did some pretty extensive rust repair on my ‘07, including cutting some rust out and repairing the frame. I’ve found that POR-15 is a solid treatment for the frame it done correctly. Eastwood internal chassis treatment is excellent for inside the frame. A little elbow grease once a year and your frame will be fine through those salty winters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm in PA and bought a California FJ on saturday.
Underneath looks new, so i sprayed it with fluid-film this afternoon as an experiment.
I'm not a fan of undercoating.
Thanks MartinbuiltFJ, may I ask you why you are not a fan of the undercoating? I read that it is really a good way to protect the frame, even though I am afraid it covers everything nuts and bolts included making any further maintenance more complicated?!
Thanks,
Riccardo
 

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That hails from way back.
Undercoating is only useful until it chips or cracks. My experience has been that it'll trap moisture and cause rust once that happens. Chassisaver and por-15 are better products, more like paint, but will also make future bolt-removal a drag.
I don't have any experience with fluid-film, but my hotrod buddies swear by it.
Waxoyl is also supposed to be good for rust prevention, but i bought what was handy.
2 aerosol cans covered the whole frame, axles and suspension. Everything now has a weird, shiny, saturated-fat kinda glaze.
I'll see what it looks like late in the fall, and possibly spray it again before the snow flies.
One problem i can see, is that it will be impossible to track down leaks, if anything goes bad. Maybe not an issue on a Toyota...
I have an old series 2a, and something is always leaking on that thing.
 

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x2 against "undercoating"

Note that the #1 protection against rust is getting the metal perfectly clean, that means cutting out all rusted through areas and welding in new, and blasting / wire brushing off all surface rust.

Then apply a phosphate converter over the bare surface (Ospho is available at any Sherwin Williams store, or Ace Hardware) to convert any microscopic iron oxide remaining into iron phosphate, a more inert form.

Then clean the surface for paint (absolutely remove all traces of oil, grease, wax, etc.).

Then apply the best quality underbody primer available, an epoxy type is nice, your goal is to get a perfect bond to the bare steel.

Then, since most primers are not waterproof, and some are not even oxygen barriers, and almost none are UV stable (sunlight), be sure to apply top coat paint over the top of the primer.

Then, and only then, after everything has been done to protect the steel from the elements, then apply rust preventative.

There are solid underbody coatings, some which go on under the top coat, like what the factory used, only the chemistry is way more advanced today. This main purpose is to absorb stone strikes and prevent paint crack.

Then, apply cavity wax over the top* . Note that sometimes wax, which dries semi-solid, can fail to fill microscopic cracks in areas where panels join, etc., you can go over that with a soft liquid like Fluid Film (or Boeshield, or Woolwax, or any lanolin based coating). These are safe around plastics, rubbers (and skin), unlike petroleum based coatings (like cavity wax) which eat rubber. FF will tend to rinse off so it would have to be touched up each year in the high wear areas, but its light nature helps it to seep into tiny cracks and help heal anything which could have opened up during use. Unfortunately, it doesn't dry "hard" so it will get messy.

If you ever have to re-do a repair, and need to remove cavity wax and FF, use oven cleaner to get them off.

The whole point of rust protection is layers. The lower layers are there to help the outer layers to stick to the surface. The outer layers are there to protect the lower layers from the elements. All of the layers will wear off over time, so the more there are (and the thicker they are) the longer that time will be.


* about cavity wax:
Amsoil HD Metal Protectant - but their spray can comes with a crap nozzle that is a pain to work with
3M Cavity Wax - awesome nozzle design and may different length 360degree spray tubes available
Cosmoline (I forget which specific product of theirs is the cavity wax) - some reviews have found this to be the superior product

In any case, the best way to apply cavity wax is if you can buy the wax in a bulk form and apply it using a spray gun like this:
https://www.amazon.com/Fluid-Film-S...ds=fluid+film+spray+gun&qid=1622027654&sr=8-4

That way the thickest layer is applied.
If you use rattle cans, be sure to apply 3 heavy coats, to get the same kind of coverage as what bulk would provide.


Norm
 

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x2 against "undercoating"

Note that the #1 protection against rust is getting the metal perfectly clean, that means cutting out all rusted through areas and welding in new, and blasting / wire brushing off all surface rust.

Then apply a phosphate converter over the bare surface (Ospho is available at any Sherwin Williams store, or Ace Hardware) to convert any microscopic iron oxide remaining into iron phosphate, a more inert form.

Then clean the surface for paint (absolutely remove all traces of oil, grease, wax, etc.).

Then apply the best quality underbody primer available, an epoxy type is nice, your goal is to get a perfect bond to the bare steel.

Then, since most primers are not waterproof, and some are not even oxygen barriers, and almost none are UV stable (sunlight), be sure to apply top coat paint over the top of the primer.

Then, and only then, after everything has been done to protect the steel from the elements, then apply rust preventative.

There are solid underbody coatings, some which go on under the top coat, like what the factory used, only the chemistry is way more advanced today. This main purpose is to absorb stone strikes and prevent paint crack.

Then, apply cavity wax over the top* . Note that sometimes wax, which dries semi-solid, can fail to fill microscopic cracks in areas where panels join, etc., you can go over that with a soft liquid like Fluid Film (or Boeshield, or Woolwax, or any lanolin based coating). These are safe around plastics, rubbers (and skin), unlike petroleum based coatings (like cavity wax) which eat rubber. FF will tend to rinse off so it would have to be touched up each year in the high wear areas, but its light nature helps it to seep into tiny cracks and help heal anything which could have opened up during use. Unfortunately, it doesn't dry "hard" so it will get messy.

If you ever have to re-do a repair, and need to remove cavity wax and FF, use oven cleaner to get them off.

The whole point of rust protection is layers. The lower layers are there to help the outer layers to stick to the surface. The outer layers are there to protect the lower layers from the elements. All of the layers will wear off over time, so the more there are (and the thicker they are) the longer that time will be.


* about cavity wax:
Amsoil HD Metal Protectant - but their spray can comes with a crap nozzle that is a pain to work with
3M Cavity Wax - awesome nozzle design and may different length 360degree spray tubes available
Cosmoline (I forget which specific product of theirs is the cavity wax) - some reviews have found this to be the superior product

In any case, the best way to apply cavity wax is if you can buy the wax in a bulk form and apply it using a spray gun like this:
https://www.amazon.com/Fluid-Film-S...ds=fluid+film+spray+gun&qid=1622027654&sr=8-4

That way the thickest layer is applied.
If you use rattle cans, be sure to apply 3 heavy coats, to get the same kind of coverage as what bulk would provide.


Norm
^^ This should be a sticky
 

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Hello Community,
I just moved to NJ and I was wondering if undercoating the FJ with nhoilundercoating product is a good idea.
I am open to any other suggestions - the car lived in Texas for 12 years and it's basically rust free.
Thanks!
Riccardo
👋🏻
Hello Community,
I just moved to NJ and I was wondering if undercoating the FJ with nhoilundercoating product is a good idea.
I am open to any other suggestions - the car lived in Texas for 12 years and it's basically rust free.
Thanks!
Riccardo
👋🏻🤠Hi.
I have a 2008 that I bought new here. I never had any rust issues, mainly because I’ve been fortunate to be able to get the salt off fairly quickly.
I started reading last year about Fluid Film, on the Forum and online, and decided to get it done, as I don’t plan on ever getting rid of my FJ.
The place I went is in Manahawkin NJ. The name is T3 Services, 780-D East Bay Avenue, Manahawkin, NJ 08050. Call them to make appt. 609 597-0075.
Here’s some before and after pictures of mine.
Let me know if you have any questions👍.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
👋🏻

👋🏻🤠Hi.
I have a 2008 that I bought new here. I never had any rust issues, mainly because I’ve been fortunate to be able to get the salt off fairly quickly.
I started reading last year about Fluid Film, on the Forum and online, and decided to get it done, as I don’t plan on ever getting rid of my FJ.
The place I went is in Manahawkin NJ. The name is T3 Services, 780-D East Bay Avenue, Manahawkin, NJ 08050. Call them to make appt. 609 597-0075.
Here’s some before and after pictures of mine.
Let me know if you have any questions👍.
Thanks patfndr. Very interesting.
May I ask you how much did you pay for this service?
 

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Hello Community,
I just moved to NJ and I was wondering if undercoating the FJ with nhoilundercoating product is a good idea.
I am open to any other suggestions - the car lived in Texas for 12 years and it's basically rust free.
Thanks!
Riccardo
Hello Community,
I just moved to NJ and I was wondering if undercoating the FJ with nhoilundercoating product is a good idea.
I am open to any other suggestions - the car lived in Texas for 12 years and it's basically rust free.
Thanks!
Riccardo
I believe that any type on encasing the metal will eventual become comprimised an tgen rust will sneak around under it.
That is why every fall I clean the frame at the car wash and then Fluid Film it all . I use my compressor and a FF gun and spraiy into the frame holes aswl. excellent results
 

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I just bought my 2008 from a friend. Pretty sure it’s always been in NW Ohio. My buddy always took the time to spray the undercarriage with a mixture of 20w oil and WD 40. It helped keep the rust away for the most part, but I’ve been making my way around the chassis and under body with a wire brush on a drill. I then blow it off with compressed air and coat it with KBS Rust Seal. I used to sell it and I still think it’s an amazing product. I’ll probably touch it up with Fluid Film before every winter to hit the places I couldn’t get with a brush. Don’t hesitate to ask if you have any questions!
 

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Hello Community,
I just moved to NJ and I was wondering if undercoating the FJ with nhoilundercoating product is a good idea.
I am open to any other suggestions - the car lived in Texas for 12 years and it's basically rust free.
Thanks!
Riccardo
Oil better than undercoating but you have to do it every year to 18 months. I used Krown on mine (live in Nebraska with much chemicals in the winter) and have no rust! There is another US brand that is similar, but doesn’t drip for days on the floor, drive, etc.like Krown! That’s the one I will use next year. Google it and you can find it’s brand name. I can’t recall off hand. Undercoating works well until it cracks, then it actually holds water and causes rust. My opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
They charge $250. Check their Facebook page as they ran a special last year in Jan. There are pictures on there too.
Thanks!
I saw the shop is a bit south from where I live - probably if the overall job takes 1-2h I can just hang out there with the family.
 

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Thanks!
I saw the shop is a bit south from where I live - probably if the overall job takes 1-2h I can just hang out there with the family.
👍 They are a good. I think the job only took about an hour, and there’s a few places that are a short walk from there if you want to kill some time.
 

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I've only had my FJ for a year, so I can't speak for longevity of my methods. My underside started out in pretty good condition. I cleaned and then hit all the little spots where rust was just starting to show (mostly on welds) with Rustoleum Rust Reformer. I then applied Fluid Film over and inside the entire frame using their spray cans with the tube/nozzle adapter. I'm in salty Missouri and this is my daily driver. It seems to have held up well this last winter. I'll do it again in the next few months.

I may try a different product this year. I semi-follow this guy on YouTube as he reviews these types of products. He recently seems to have settled on Blaster surface shield, which he thinks outperforms Fluid Film.

 

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It's up to you, but you could buy 25 cans of fluid film for $250.
2 covered the underside of my truck, and it took less than 15 minutes.
Plus, my driveway is rustproofed.
 
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