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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Below are the steps I went through to add a Hayden Model 679 Automatic Transmission Cooler to my 2007 FJ.

Many of you may ask why I am doing this . Forum member “bartt” put it quite eloquently in another thread:

“AT's are usually designed to run for a long time at their design temp (usually 160-170F), toyota states 115-130F. Unfortunately engines are designed to run somewhat hotter (180-200) for smog reasons. With that said, the AT fluid is cooled by running it into a reservoir on the radiator of the engine, boosting its temp to about 180. Studies have shown that for every 20 degrees hotter you run the tranny, you cut its life in half. This is not good from a non-towing easy driving standpoint, if you expect your tranny to last (I think we all expect this from a Toyota).”

Couple the above with my plans to do semi-regular towing of around 3000 pounds and you will understand my desire for the transmission cooler.

The 679 is the largest Hayden stacked plate cooler. It retails for $60.99 at Pep Boys.
Pep Boys and Advance Auto also carry the Hayden 678 which is marginally smaller for $69.99. Being a cheap-skate I opted to get the cheaper yet larger cooler. The 678 seems to be the favorite of the 4 runner crowd. Still I opted for the 679.

Below is the list of parts you will need for this install:
1. Hayden Transmission Oil Cooler – $60.99 purchased at Pep Boys
2. 3/8” Transmission Oil Cooler Line (10ft) – $12.99 purchased at Advance Auto (DO NOT use fuel hose. THERE IS specific AT transmission cooler hose. Pep Boys disagreed with me, so I went elsewhere). You really only need 6 ft, but get the extra.
3. Pump – $3.99 purchased at Advance Auto
4. 1 Qt. ATF-WS – $6.99 purchased at dealer




Below is the cooler out of its packaging. It comes with 4 hose clamps and the required mounting ties.





STEP 1: Mount the Cooler.

This is the most difficult part of the installation. Positioning the cooler on the A/C condenser will take the majority of the install time.

1A) Remove the Headlight Bezel – There are 2 10mm bolts and 2 pop clips on the top of the bezel. After that pull the bezel forward and it will come loose.



1B) Remove A/C line bracket. The A/C line bracket shown below is held in place with a single 10mm nut. Remove it the pull the bracket forward and it will swing out of the way. This is necessary to slip the cooler into position.



1C) Remove the Horn. One 12mm bolt holds it in place. Let it dangle in place or try to get the hood latch to hold it out of the way.

1D) Remove the top 2 radiator bolts. In order to get to the rear of the AC condenser you will need to make some room. Remove the top 2 radiator bolts. They are located in the upper inner corner of each headlight as shown below. Loosen them and lightly pry the radiator back. This will give enough room to fit your hand in the gap.








1E) Install the lines on the cooler. Do not over tighten the hose clamps. I put 5 ft on each side of the line. This is about 2 feet too much, but I prefer to cut it later.




1F) Mount the cooler. I mounted mine to the upper-passenger’s side of the A/C condenser. The bracket and horn needed to be removed to slip the cooler in place. Once you have it in place use the ties and mounting pads provided to hold it in place.




1G) Route the lines – I routed the lines though the core support in the same hole that the A/C line comes though. The A/C line is surrounded by supporting foam. I cut 2 holes in the foam for the line to go through. This will protect the lines from direct metal contact. I also zip-tied the hoses together.





STEP 2 – Connect the hoses.

The hoses should connect after the fluid is leaving the radiator. The lower transmission hose on the radiator should be removed completely. You cannot reuse the factory hose clamps as the factory hose’s outside diameter is larger. The clamps will not grab.

2A) Remove the skid plate – 4 12mm bolts hold it in place

2B) Attach the upper hose -



After you remove the hose pictured above, Route your NEW upper hose from the cooler to the nipple circled above. Cut to length and attach with a hose clamp. Make sure you do not crimp the hose. Leave enough slack.

2C) – Attach the Lower Hose -
Your lower hose should be mounted to the return line shown in the picture below.
This picture was taken while laying on the ground with my head towards the rear of the vehicle. Route your NEW lower hose from the cooler to the nipple circled above. Cut to length and attach with a hose clamp. Make sure you do not crimp the hose. Leave enough slack.





STEP 3 – Fill the transmission with enough fluid.

All the talk around here about the transmission being “sealed” seems a little silly. It is no more “sealed" than any manual transmission. In fact it is filled in a very similar manner to a manual transmission. I have to say that this process is actually very straightforward.

Follow the steps outlined in this pdf exactly. This is from the Factory Service Manual for the 4 runner, but the process is the same since the transmission is the same. Use the hand pump to get the fluid into the fill hole. You cannot tip the bottle to get it in.



CHECK FOR LEAKS.
Replace all of the removed components.



Added 06/09/2007 -

The cooler has now been on for a few weeks. I have checked the fluid level weekly to ensure that my fill procedure was correct.

The past two days have been hot for Virginia. 98 and 92 degrees respectively.

Today ambient temp is around 95. i have NO load on the vehicle. I will have to retest after/during towing.

After 30 minutes of driving here is what I measured with my infrared thermometer.

Upper Radiator hose - constant 165 - very stable reading. I did this to test the accuracy of the other readings.

From Transmission to Radiator - 130 - very interesting. not all that hot.
Out of Radiator to cooler - 118 - Radiator is definately cooling the line temp.
Out of cooler back to pan - 106 - actually this is a little cooler than desired accoriding to FSM.


From the above you can see that the readings are all very good. The radiator is definately doing its job. The only gotcha in my measurements is that I did not take a reading before installing the cooler. One might argue that the initial transmission temp would be higher, but I think the Toyota engineers are better at their jobs than I would be. Based off of the above I would think that it would not be necessary, or even desired, to have a cooler on a non-towing, non-crawling FJ.....but then, who would want that?
 

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I can't see myself needing one of these unless I lived in Texas and constantly floored my FJ and never let off... I just can't. I'm positive my transmission in my FJ will last for at least 150,000 miles if not more, and honestly, that's all I need it to last, by then I'll be buying a NEW FJ Cruiser. Good guide though.
 

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Am I missing something, what about the pump?
I think he meant to say he used the hand pump to put the extra quart of trans fluid into the side of the transmission. An easier way would be to put it directly into the hose, to save having to get under the car. Otherwise, good article.
 

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I did the same thing to my silverado a couple of months ago and i love it! I drive in 90+ temperatures here in PR. and the tranny shifts smoothly no matter how long the trip! I am planning on doing the same thing to the FJ soon, thanks for the post and pics :D

 

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LooseToe,
Thanks for the info. I occasionally tow a 3000 pound boat and always install a cooler in my tow vehicles. I am a believer a cooler is a good investment.

Keith
 

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Did you per chance take any before/after readings of temps with an infrared thermometer on the cooler lines?

DEWFPO
 

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Just a thought ....back in feb called the toyota # in CA and talked to a tech....they looked up my trailer and vette weight and assured me that being under the 5000 lb tow rating that a tranny cooler was not needed because it has one built in the tranny already. even told me that it would be under warnty if it failed....... jury is still out and prob gonna put one on anyway...better safe than sorry..... bty vette n trailer was around 4350 if i think
 

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Very Nice write up.
Thanks for the pics, this is inspiring.
My cooler has been sitting on the workbench for far too long. I guess I need to get to work. :)
 

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Excellent post!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Did you per chance take any before/after readings of temps with an infrared thermometer on the cooler lines?

DEWFPO
Good question.

The cooler has now been on for a few weeks. I have checked the fluid level weekly to ensure that my fill procedure was correct.

The past two days have been hot for Virginia. 98 and 92 degrees respectively.

Today ambient temp is around 95. i have NO load on the vehicle. I will have to retest after/during towing.

After 30 minutes of driving here is what I measured with my infrared thermometer.

Upper Radiator hose - constant 165 - very stable reading. I did this to test the accuracy of the other readings.

From Transmission to Radiator - 130 - very interesting. not all that hot.
Out of Radiator to cooler - 118 - Radiator is definately cooling the line temp.
Out of cooler back to pan - 106 - actually this is a little cooler than desired accoriding to FSM.


From the above you can see that the readings are all very good. The radiator is definately doing its job. The only gotcha in my measurements is that I did not take a reading before installing the cooler. One might argue that the initial transmission temp would be higher, but I think the Toyota engineers are better at their jobs than I would be. Based off of the above I would think that it would not be necessary, or even desired, to have a cooler on a non-towing, non-crawling FJ.....but then, who would want that?
 

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Nice write up.

Just a thought , should we run metal lines? I know when I did my 66 F100 I ran metal because I was afraid of the radiator support metal wearing through the rubber hose.
 

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Well the mod cherry is broken!!! Just finished installing the trans cooler, this post was a big help with the little FJC specific things. Two things when you do it though make sure your garage electrical system is working, and Surefire makes the best flashlights in the world(was using an Executive Elite E2e), did the whole thing by flashlight!! Now my wife can have the boat on the Chesapeake Bay this weekend. Will keep an eye things for the next few days and post if anything shows up. Loosetoe as soon as I figure out how to give you rep points I'll do it. Thanks!!
 

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Just a thought for anyone who lives in a colder climate... Having the tranny plumbed into the radiator brings the tranny up to operating temperature. This is a warning to anybody who is thinking about removing the radiator from the trans cooling system. Your trans will not warm up and you will suffer horrible mpg and/or possibly damage the trans. Otherwise, good write up.

I drove my FJ with 1k on the ticker from VA to Alaska towing a 4k# trailer and didn't have a single problem. Traveled through everything from flat desert to mountains. I don't really think this vehicle needs a tranny cooler. It was always my understanding that crawling through rocks/mud etc at a snails pace is harder on the tranny than towing at highway speeds.

My .02:)
 

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Here is the PDF for the FJ auto trans fluid level check, fill, and change. Probably the same as the 4Runner but here it is anyway.

Bugs
 

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YES, YES, YES!!! :bigthumb: This write up is great, and as I have just discovered essential to the longevity of the Transmission. I just had my 60k service done, and even though Toyota says the fluid is good for 100k, my fluid was already brown. Yes, I bought my FJ with all the intensions of putting it to use, which I have. So it has been wheeled quite a bit and I have towed the occasional quad, boat, and snowmobile (none over 3,000 lbs.) I am certainly going to do this simple and inexpensive mod as I have to make this thing last for 500k as I am so upside down in it (and proud of it)!!! :rocker:
 

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Good write up, I am debating on doing this. I think it might be over kill cause all i will be towing is 2 bikes (>1500) about 500 miles. Not sure if I need it
 
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