Toyota FJ Cruiser Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Okay, before I get jumped on and told to just read the angle on the gauge.....

I've observed that when going up or down a bridge the inclinometer reads no inclination. The slope of the bridge is at least 10-15 degrees. But when going over an obstacle like a speed bump I can see the deflection in the gauge as the relationship between the sprung and unsprung parts changes.

Likewise when turning you can easily see the body lean during a turn on the inclinometer.

So it appears the inclinometer is reading the angle between the sprung and unsprung parts of the truck on both axis, and not the absolute angle of vehicle. Is this correct?

Thanks, David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
I belive its just a weighed ball really. I know I can leave red-light and it says I'm pretty nose high. Ill see what it does in turns also. I have front sway bar delete so I lean pretty good.

Sent from my SM-N960U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
What Dirty Ricky said. when moving it is heavily influenced by G-forces. More of a gadget than an accurate gauge.
Roger. but why doesn’t it show an incline when going over a bridge? Stays right on zero. But when you bounce a little over a speed bump you see the change on the gauge.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,716 Posts
Do you ever see it indicate an incline? A normal incline not a bump. Mine shows an incline when driving up a mountain hiway or trail. Same thing for nose down. The roll you get in a turn is nowhere near what the dial is showing. Not very useful when bouncing around.

Might not be working??

Finally found it in my manual. Page 146 ('13) Couldn't find it in the index, Toyota calls it a clinometer. Book doesn't really say much about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
Roger. but why doesn’t it show an incline when going over a bridge? Stays right on zero. But when you bounce a little over a speed bump you see the change on the gauge.
Because its just that. Its a bump. If its just a weighted ball that tries to keep the weight going down like a a plumb bob. That bump makes it bounce around. Next time your going up or down try to make it move via acceleration or braking, you will see it move. I don't have an answer as to why it doesn't show while going over a bridge. Mine moves very little when I'm going up and down normal road Inclines. Even in the mountains on the intestate

Sent from my SM-N960U1 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The indicator moves a lot when going around curves, probable because the body is leaning relative to the wheels. I think it's the same with the inclination front to back. When you just start over a bump or accelerate you see the inclination but once it reaches steady state it goes back to zero, even on hills or other inclines.

So I don't think it's a fluid issue because it is responding well in situations where the body is not on the same plane as the wheels. Seems pretty worthless if it can't tell you how much incline you are on after you achieve it.

I'm not an off road course type but I am an Nuke, and like to see things working per specification (whatever that may be).

So, how many don't see any change to the inclinometer when going over a bridge or hill or whatever?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,429 Posts
I think you are over-thinking the whole clinometer 'issue'.

The clinometer is not reading the difference "between the sprung and unsprung parts of the truck on both axis"; it is a very simple gravity-operated plumb bob, always trying to align the off-center mass in the bottom of the ball with the center of the earth.

None of the gauges on the FJ provides a high-resolution measurement of anything. The fuel gauge isn't calibrated in gallons, it doesn't tell you that you have 12.75 gallons of fuel remaining, it gives you an approximate indication of fuel level based on units of approximately 1/8 tank capacity.

The temperature gauge isn't calibrated in degrees, it doesn't have any graduations at all, and just displays a very approximate relative indication of coolant temperature, with a small red 'danger zone' at the very top.

The clinometer is really just a gimmick, it is not calibrated in any absolute units of angle, and has no real function when driving on or off-road, other than a rough indicator of body angle relative to true horizontal.

There is no sophisticated MEMS angle sensor involved, it's just a spherical plumb bob suspended in a liquid filled housing.

You may not be seeing any angle displayed while on a bridge because normal vehicular traffic bridges are built with relatively mild inclines. What does the ball indicate when you're climbing a steep incline when off-road, or when you run your front wheels up on a steep curb?

Another possibility is that your clinometer may have lost some of its fluid, just enough to affect operation, while not being enough to see a low liquid level yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I think you are over-thinking the whole clinometer 'issue'.

The clinometer is not reading the difference "between the sprung and unsprung parts of the truck on both axis"; it is a very simple gravity-operated plumb bob, always trying to align the off-center mass in the bottom of the ball with the center of the earth.

None of the gauges on the FJ provides a high-resolution measurement of anything. The fuel gauge isn't calibrated in gallons, it doesn't tell you that you have 12.75 gallons of fuel remaining, it gives you an approximate indication of fuel level based on units of approximately 1/8 tank capacity.

The temperature gauge isn't calibrated in degrees, it gives you a very approximate indication of coolant temperature, relative to green 'safe operating' and red 'danger' zones.

The clinometer is really just a gimmick, it is not calibrated in any absolute units of angle, and has no real function when driving on or off-road, other than a rough indicator of body angle relative to true horizontal.

There is no sophisticated MEMS angle sensor involved, it's just a spherical plumb bob suspended in a liquid filled housing.

You may not be seeing any angle displayed while on a bridge because normal vehicular traffic bridges are built with relatively mild inclines. What does the ball indicate when you're climbing a steep incline when off-road, or when you run your front wheels up on a steep curb?

Another possibility is that your clinometer may have lost some of its fluid, just enough to affect operation, while not being enough to see a low liquid level yet.
Roger all, thanks. It shows side to side body lean readily. I’ll remove it and rotate it around and see what the response is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I think you are over-thinking the whole clinometer 'issue'.

The clinometer is not reading the difference "between the sprung and unsprung parts of the truck on both axis"; it is a very simple gravity-operated plumb bob, always trying to align the off-center mass in the bottom of the ball with the center of the earth.

None of the gauges on the FJ provides a high-resolution measurement of anything. The fuel gauge isn't calibrated in gallons, it doesn't tell you that you have 12.75 gallons of fuel remaining, it gives you an approximate indication of fuel level based on units of approximately 1/8 tank capacity.

The temperature gauge isn't calibrated in degrees, it gives you a very approximate indication of coolant temperature, relative to green 'safe operating' and red 'danger' zones.

The clinometer is really just a gimmick, it is not calibrated in any absolute units of angle, and has no real function when driving on or off-road, other than a rough indicator of body angle relative to true horizontal.

There is no sophisticated MEMS angle sensor involved, it's just a spherical plumb bob suspended in a liquid filled housing.

You may not be seeing any angle displayed while on a bridge because normal vehicular traffic bridges are built with relatively mild inclines. What does the ball indicate when you're climbing a steep incline when off-road, or when you run your front wheels up on a steep curb?

Another possibility is that your clinometer may have lost some of its fluid, just enough to affect operation, while not being enough to see a low liquid level yet.
So if you go up a long 10 degree grade it should show 10 degrees on the gauge. No joy with the one in my truck. I’ll pull it off and examine more closely.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,716 Posts
Besides, you won't be looking at the clinometer when it gets dicey anyway. Too many variables to predict when she's going to roll over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
As much of a gimmick as it the clinometer might be, it won’t read “correctly” going over a bridge because you’re moving. This type of device only gives a reasonably accurate reading when stationary. The physics of driving forward pull everything in the vehicle back, including the fluid and mass in the clinometer.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
12,770 Posts
You're all hijacking the thread with these shenanigans. Plenty of room in the Off Topic area for this. If you don't where that is, check the 18+ box in your account settings and another part of the forum will open MAGICALLY. :ROFLMAO:

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,429 Posts
As much of a gimmick as it the clinometer might be, it won’t read “correctly” going over a bridge because you’re moving. This type of device only gives a reasonably accurate reading when stationary. The physics of driving forward pull everything in the vehicle back, including the fluid and mass in the clinometer.
Not exactly ... as long as you're moving at a constant speed (not accelerating or decelerating) the clinometer will work fine, even going over a bridge.

A clinometer would work just fine in a jet travelling at 600 MPH as long as the speed was constant and the flight path was straight and level.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
201 Posts
In theory yes, but no FJ moves at a constant speed, especially one driving over an imperfect surface at constantly changing throttle inputs from a human foot going over a bridge. It’s good enough for a “guesstimate,” but the toy in the FJ is by no means comparable to an aircraft inclinometer.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MR_XG78

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
In theory yes, but no FJ moves at a constant speed, especially one driving over an imperfect surface at constantly changing throttle inputs from a human foot going over a bridge. It’s good enough for a “guesstimate,” but the toy in the FJ is by no means comparable to an aircraft inclinometer.
So sort of like the gas gauge 🤪
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top