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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am looking for some advice on this summer's family trip.
I finally convinced my wife to do the trip I have been wanting to do for 20 years. I am driving from Cali to Alaska. I planned a total of 27 days (willing to add a few if necessary). I have a popup camper that I am going to tow behind my FJ. Our plan for the trip to Alaska is as follows:
20th leave Vancouver to Bowron Lakes Provincial park
24th leave to Stone Mountain provincial park
26th leave to Haines junction to Kulane National Park
30th leave to Fairbanks
1-5th Denali National Park

Then I return over the course of 12 days back to Vancouver. I am going to stop for 2 days at Tweedsmuir Provincial Park.
Who has done a drive to Alaska? Is there any places that you would recommend to stop at on the way home? Any thing you wished you would had done if you had more time?
Like I said this is a trip of a lifetime that probably will not be repeated.
Also, Is there any preparations or things you wished you would of brought/done but didn't?
 

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Moose-Quito Season, get some head nets.

Deutsche Optiks sells 4 pack of 20L real steel original Jerry cans with spout and gaskets too for $191 FREE S&H.

An extra spare or at least a plug kit and compressor.

Go into Talkeetna and take the Talkeetna Air Taxi Dehavilland Beaver ride over Denali and they land on the glacier. Bucket List views! Yeah, we landed down there. :grin There's a small RV Park there by the airport and train station if you need to setup, shower, laundry, etc. The Mayor is super friendly.

Homer Half Day Hookers for Halibut fishing. RV park and camping on the Spit, incredible views! The Mariners Memorial is here.

The Mooses Tooth in Anchorage, best darn pizza ever and they're a microbrewery too.

Tcao drove it, use the search and find his thread. I did it, but not in my FJ. We spent 17 days up there, love it! Buy the "Milepost" guide book, it's well worth it.

:wave:
 

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Americans drooling over jerry cans that pour properly ;-)
 

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I bought some of those horrible CAlifornia compliant cans with the funky spout and it came apart and half went down the neck and into my tank. No fun getting that out, in the woods, in the snow. :flame:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wow, thank you for the info, I am going to look up the halibut fishing and the plane ride to the glacier. I will post the other spots in my driving guide. I love the picture. I hope for views like this.
 

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The Milepost, mentioned by @Hannibal above, is the essential tool for the trip. Buy it now, and read it. Your Navigator should read it as well. Then you can plan your trip much more intelligently. In addition to Hannibal's excellent ideas, here are a few more:

Laird River Hotsprings.
The Bakery in Haines Junction.
Museum of the North in Fairbanks.
Whitehorse -- drive down to the visitors center. Steamboat is fun and you will want to walk around.
Consider taking the Cassiar Highway on the return trip. It has beautiful scenery and you are almost guaranteed to see a black bear.
Here is an informative map of Alaska in pdf format.
Drive the Denali Highway between Cantwell and Paxon. At the east end are the Tangle Lakes with a nicely improved campground from the old days, and the roadhouses along this highway are emblematic of the old style roadhouses, most now destroyr=ed by fire.
In my view, after having lived in Alaska since 1976, the Richardson Highway is the last remaining highway that gives you an idea what it was like to live here in the days immediately before the pipeline brought so much change. Glennallen, Copper Center, and so on will let you know you are NOT in California.
Drive over Hatcher Pass and visit the mines at the top.
Stop in at the Bakery in Girdwood. The bakery at the junction of the highway is fine, but the cinnamon buns at the Bakery in Girdwood itself is much, much better.
The best biscuits and gravy in Anchorage are at the coffee shop at South Restaurant on the Old Seward Highway.
Fenton Brothers for fishing on the Kenai. They are great guides and hilarious. Mike and Murray have been doing this for decades.
If you are a foodie, stop at Froth and Forage on the Seward Highway near Indian. You can't go wrong with anything on the menu, but their poutine is a belly buster.
If you want to go up to the Yukon, you can drive up the haul road, in which case you will stop at the Hilltop restaurant for pie and the obligatory bumper sticker. Or you can drive up the Steese and see it there, plus there is a chance to drop into Circle Hot Springs, now a fading memory of what it once was.
There is so much more. After you read the Milepost, you will see what I mean.

A final note. In mid-summer, all the fuel stops are open. You should not need extra fuel, even on the Cassiar, if you utilize your CPU and keep an eye on the fuel gauge. My rule of thumb is before leaving a population center, I look at the fuel gauge and assure that I have more than enough fuel to make it to the next major town. I travel with no more than 4 gallons in a rotopax. even at the 15 mpg pulling a trailer, that gives you 60 miles. However, if you do go North of Fairbanks to see the Yukon, carry at least that 4 gallons.

Avoid the Coal River Campground. The food may be good, but the shower rooms are, uhh, yucky.

Safe travels.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The Milepost, mentioned by @Hannibal above, is the essential tool for the trip. Buy it now, and read it. Your Navigator should read it as well. Then you can plan your trip much more intelligently. In addition to Hannibal's excellent ideas, here are a few more:

Laird River Hotsprings.
The Bakery in Haines Junction.
Museum of the North in Fairbanks.
Whitehorse -- drive down to the visitors center. Steamboat is fun and you will want to walk around.
Consider taking the Cassiar Highway on the return trip. It has beautiful scenery and you are almost guaranteed to see a black bear.
Here is an informative map of Alaska in pdf format.
Drive the Denali Highway between Cantwell and Paxon. At the east end are the Tangle Lakes with a nicely improved campground from the old days, and the roadhouses along this highway are emblematic of the old style roadhouses, most now destroyr=ed by fire.
In my view, after having lived in Alaska since 1976, the Richardson Highway is the last remaining highway that gives you an idea what it was like to live here in the days immediately before the pipeline brought so much change. Glennallen, Copper Center, and so on will let you know you are NOT in California.
Drive over Hatcher Pass and visit the mines at the top.
Stop in at the Bakery in Girdwood. The bakery at the junction of the highway is fine, but the cinnamon buns at the Bakery in Girdwood itself is much, much better.
The best biscuits and gravy in Anchorage are at the coffee shop at South Restaurant on the Old Seward Highway.
Fenton Brothers for fishing on the Kenai. They are great guides and hilarious. Mike and Murray have been doing this for decades.
If you are a foodie, stop at Froth and Forage on the Seward Highway near Indian. You can't go wrong with anything on the menu, but their poutine is a belly buster.
If you want to go up to the Yukon, you can drive up the haul road, in which case you will stop at the Hilltop restaurant for pie and the obligatory bumper sticker. Or you can drive up the Steese and see it there, plus there is a chance to drop into Circle Hot Springs, now a fading memory of what it once was.
There is so much more. After you read the Milepost, you will see what I mean.

A final note. In mid-summer, all the fuel stops are open. You should not need extra fuel, even on the Cassiar, if you utilize your CPU and keep an eye on the fuel gauge. My rule of thumb is before leaving a population center, I look at the fuel gauge and assure that I have more than enough fuel to make it to the next major town. I travel with no more than 4 gallons in a rotopax. even at the 15 mpg pulling a trailer, that gives you 60 miles. However, if you do go North of Fairbanks to see the Yukon, carry at least that 4 gallons.

Avoid the Coal River Campground. The food may be good, but the shower rooms are, uhh, yucky.

Safe travels.
Thank you for this great info and the pdf. I knew if I posted this trip I would get some great first hand experience. These have all been great suggestions. As far as the milepost I have that and it was the first thing that I read before I started planning. Thank you blue room.
 

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Sounds like you've got most things covered for a good trip (I grew up in Alaska). However, I would suggest really take your time in Bc and Yukon, even though they're Canada the sights in those places just off the highway are spectacular.

Also, it is Alaska. I hear the Dalton and the AlCan are much much better than the last time I drove them but be prepared for problems. Help can be a long, long way away if you have a vehicle problem. Check out Lifestyle Overland on youtube, they vlogged a trip they did in 2018 but it highlights some of the problems you may encounter. And the Dalton is great but I'm gonna try the Dempster next year.
 

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When you're in Bowron Lakes Provincial Park, are you planning a side trip to Barkerville?
 

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I haven't read this whole thread, but the one thing i have to say is.... CHECK YOUR TRAILER LUG NUTS AFTER EVERY STOP!!!
Why?!?! PM me. I have my reasons.
 
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