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Discussion Starter #21
Update time!

The head unit went in without much of a hitch.


The weather held off enough to get the system operational. I first finished wiring the essentials. The ground wire is bolted down using an existing ground point, located under the driver's seat. I ground the paint off, mounted this, and then later painted it black to prevent bare metal corrosion. So far, there's been no noise and no issues with this mounting spot, and I do recommend it.



I then created two 4 gauge cables for the other amp.


Sub amp


These days, I only use ferrules instead of bare wire.


This driver's side is a bit more cluttered. I will have to work on a better wiring setup at another time, perhaps in the spring I'll get back in here and get this more tidy That DSP/amp is not scratched, this pic scared me when I saw it but its just dust.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Tme to show off the door work. My 2012 FJ w/ the JBL setup looks like this to start. I like the reinforced areas, nice touch Toyota.


Got the first layer of deadening inside. About 1.5 sheets for the inside, so about 70% coverage. More than my typical job, but then again the speakers going in are pretty robust, and the door has a lot of flat area that needs to not resonate.


I continued on with about 1.5 sheets on the outer layer. Note, to mount the speakers I used the Metra 6x9 adapter set. I first added deadener in-between the door metal and the adapter, and then laid deadener inside to seal it


I then topped the adapter ring with 1/8" Neoprene, and used 1/4" Neoprene in a sheet directly behind the speaker. To avoid cutting the connectors off, I used Metra speaker connector adapters. I was going to run fresh wire through the door, but I stopped short when I saw the wire they used was completely sufficient in gauge.


I connected my Audiofrog GS690 woofer and mounted



I then worked on the plastic door panel, and added ample deadener as well.


I glued on a 1/8" sheet of Neoprene and cut to size, and this completed the left door.


The right door got all the same treatment with the same amount of material. When I do doors, I always set aside a matching sheet for the other side as I work. This way I don't use too much or too little for one side or another.


 

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Discussion Starter #23
As for connecting these woofers, I elected to cut and solder on the wiring leading up to the door on each side. The access is good and it works well right here to pull back the factory sheathing and snip/solder.


Next up, I pulled the factory sub to see the dual voice coil color setup. I used a AA battery and a tap-test to determine which wires were for which coil, and which one was positive vs. negative. In case this technique is new to you, you can tap the wires briefly with the AA battery and see if the cone moves OUT or IN. If the cone moves out, you got the polarity correct.


Once I located the positives and the negatives, I mated them together in a connector


And joined them to the 12 gauge wire I ran back there.


I don't think I took a pic of it, but I also ran a 16/4 wire back there to mate to the rear speakers. I clipped and soldered right at the connector the JBL system uses to power all the speakers. I also removed the factory amp back here, to simplify things.


That's it for now. The system fires up and runs, no issues. I'll have to snag some pics of the acoustic tune measurements and other things, so you can see how that works.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Oh I noticed I didn't take any pics of the tweeters and how all that went. I was doing it in near-darkness in the cold, so I just didn't think about pictures. But what I did was use 1/8" thick hardboard panel, cut to match the shape of the existing speaker, and then a circle cut out to mount the tweeter in the middle. I'll have to snag some pics but it was easy, quick work and done in minutes.

OK, now on to the portion of audio that I really enjoy, the TUNE! Of course, a good install leads up to this.

Methodology:
Room EQ Wizard (called REW) is connected to the directly via my laptop to the Helix DSP/Amp, via an 1/8" stereo to RCA Y-cable.
Helix connected to laptop via USB
Umik-1 microphone connected to laptop via USB, and running 90 degree calibration file
When I run sweeps, I use a multi-placement measurement technique where I hold the mic in a location near one of my ears, sweep the system, and then move the mic a little bit, sweep again, etc. Do a few times per ear. Differences in the response are expected due to slight variations in the response as the mic is moved around the headspace, and that's why it is so important to capture multiple measurements, and average them. This becomes more important at higher frequencies, whereas a subwoofer measurement would be only needed in one place. Distortion and waterfall plots can't be created from averages, so one of the individual measurements is used there. Important safety note... I always use sound-reducing earphones (like you would when running loud machinery) when doing these sweeps.

Last note, these measurements are smoothed with Variable smoothing. When using REW, its important to pick a smoothing value that you like and that fits your needs. I will also sometimes switch to Psychoacoustic smoothing, depending on the issue. Sometimes what you measure can't be easily heard by the ear, so sometimes you have to compensate differently.


This is the LF tweet:


This is the RF tweet


LF and RF tweet averages


This is the EQ target curve vs. the LF tweet's average response. This target curve is the basic response output that I desire from the system, and a graphical representation of the filters REW creates to get me there.


and this is that response against the Predicted response.


This is the EQ target curve for the RF tweet's response.


And the target curve (nevermind the spike at the far end, it isn't audible)


All of those responses were what determined the crossover frequency for these tweeters to be 1800Hz, with a 4th order/24dB Linkwitz-Riley crossover slope (called LR24). The distortion profile was so low, background ambient noises were stronger than the distortion. I'm Very pleased about this.

Next up, woofers.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
This is the LF woofer response, with no crossovers.


Distortion is good but shows a crossover point in the 70-80hz range will probably be ideal. The excitation of materials, even deadened ones, occurs below this and starts to cause issues. Still, the response of the GS690 woofers in these doors is impressive all the way down to 40hz. Truly, a great choice for the FJ.


This is the LF Waterfall plot, which is great for determining what frequency causes ringing through excitation of materials in the cabin, as well as the ringing of the speaker itself. As the graph shows, the deadening works phenomenally to prevent resonance. I'm pleased with results like these.


Here's the LF woofer EQ filter


Here's the predicted response, note that the EQ filter is from about 80hz to 1800hz.


RF Woofer distortion


RF Waterfall


RF woofer EQ filter


Predicted response for RF


Response graph of all speakers measured (averages)



I ran all of these filters in my Helix DSP via the "R" command, which takes exported text files equivalent to these filters, and imports them directly to the software. Here's what all those look like


As far as rears, I set them to a tame 300hz - 6000hz response, lowered output by 6dB from baseline, and left them un-eq'd. Their contribution to the system is purely for ambient fill, so they'll work great as-is.

As far as subwoofer, I ran into a snag during fabrication, and lost an important connector that runs the Remote turn on lead output from the DSP to the sub amp. A replacement connector is on its way, and when I get it I'll run my measurements for the subwoofer, as well as get total response plots to confirm my EQ changes have the intended result. Just in testing with some of my favorite music by ear, the system sounds absolutely bad-ass. I'm very pleased with the results, and I would recommend a similar system to anyone that wants a quality, yet simple system in their FJ.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
LOL. TMI?

Well, point is, it sounds great. That little connector should be here soon, so I can give a demo locally if anybody wants to hear it.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Just a small update:

I got the connector I was waiting for, and with that I was able to power on my sub amp to complete the system. I powered up the factory sub (parallel down to 1 ohm), set the gain very low, and began to run some basic sweeps. The factory sub was set for a 70hz crossover against the GS690's at 24dB/oct, Linkwitz-Riley slope, and I put a 20hz infrasonic filter in place as well. My target house curve base SPL was met pretty easily, though I had to EQ out the excessive boom occuring around 45hz (most likely caused by cabin gain.) I let REW set the recommended filters, copied them to the Helix DSP, and then adjusted the final response based off a sweep test from the sub to the front stage.

My findings so far on the factory sub: This thing is more capable than I bet most here give it credit. I have connected over a 1000W of power so I'm sure that I could, in an instant, smoke the factory sub. Yet I can tell that if it is given quite a bit more power than the factory amp provides, the thing can still perform. At higher volumes, it is apparent that the ENCLOSURE is more the issue, than the sub itself. The enclosure is built with two small plastic ports, though they are very aerodynamic so as long as volume is kept under control (and you can definitely tell when it is "done", these ports chuff only on low notes, below system tuning (which appears to be around 35hz or so...not bad!) During my testing (which was brief as I had other things to do), I noticed that it crossed best around 70-75hz and matched with the front woofers, and it definitely required a strong infrasonic filter in the 20's range.

Based on what I've learned, I have a suggested budget setup to recommend, if the thought of doing a DSP / Amp and all the expense associated doesn't sound appealing.

Get a powerful but small and thin 5ch amp, and use it along with a good quality double-din head unit that has crossover and time alignment controls. Make sure the 5ch amp can perform at either 4 ohm or 1 ohm on the sub channel, with a few hundred watts of power at the minimum. Get a quality set of 6x9 components (Audiofrog would remain my recommendation), and use a passive crossover setup with the tweeters in the factory location, as it works pretty well. Tap into the factory sub as I have done, either 4 ohm (series) or 1 ohm (parallel), and use the head unit's basic EQ controls to tame some of the peaks in the midrange, and bass range that will result (as I've shown and explained.) Pair that with about 15 sq ft of deadener minimum, some neoprene foam (1/8" is fine), and get to work. With the head unit (a Pioneer or Kenwood or something) that has enough intelligence to run the basic crossovers, time alignment, and EQ, you'll be able to run a basic version of what I've got here, and it should sound darn good. I'd say all-in, you'd probably be completely done at under $1500, including speaker wiring, power and ground, deadening, foam, head unit, front speakers, etc. If your goals are sound quality over SPL, the factory sub (when properly powered) will sustain the required SPL, even with a bottom-heavy house curve target like I use (the Hanatsu curve), and that's really all you need.

I'll eventually seek to replace the factory sub with something more capable, but for now and through the winter, I think this setup will serve just fine.
 
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