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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I wont get into the details surrounding the need to replace my clutch at only 143k. See the various throwout bearing threads...

I referred to the pdf files of the Toyota manual for the FJ but found that a lot of steps could be eliminated or worked around. Since I was documenting for this post, I took a lot more time than otherwise needed. A lot of little things kind of took more time being careful not to bust anything..

Tool requirements are pretty basic but as others have posted a couple tools are essential, primarily the 36" extension adapter 1/2-3/8" drive. I got mine from Snap-On but if you have time, they are available for almost half the price online. Make sure you get the impact version - I would have broken mine if it had been the non-impact version.
Secondly the 3/8" drive 14 & 17mm wobble sockets. I got a set at Harbor Freight for $25, along with the better transmission jack.





Since my input shaft quill had wear on it at 37k requiring the replacement of the bellhousing I figured 110k on this one was going to have more wear so I ordered the PDM sleeve kit from URD. I also purchased the Toyota TSB components that had never been replaced: Slave cylinder and pivot stud for the throwout fork.

Here are the comparisons between the old and new TSB parts.







The ball design on the pivot stud is different but the length is the same.
The slave cylinder as has been pointed out in other threads did not fully function which kept the TO bearing against the clutch and did not allow the clutch to fully engage...

A couple other items to purchase while getting ready for this job:



Use the caliper grease (high temp waterproof) and fill the slave cylinder boot in order to prevent future failure due top corrosion.
Use the electrical cleaner to clean out all the electrical connectors and, if you are not machining the flywheel, to clean it residue free before reassembly.
Put some of the dielectric grease in each of the connectors for additional protection against moisture.

Since my FJ is riding on 34's and an Icon Stage lift I didn't bother to run it up on ramps etc. and it worked out fine.
First thing I did was remove both drive shafts - pretty straight forward job. The studs on the transfer case flanges are fixed, no tool required to hold them.





Next I removed the bolts that attach the rear trans mount to the tranny. I did not follow the Toyota manual in removing the entire mount.





Then I removed the center console cover, gear shift knobs, then the console.
Followed the Toyota manual on that because I hadn't had it off for a while. Mine was a little more complicated because my Cobra CB is mounted under there...





Removing the shifter lever boot is straightforward... the Hi/Lo lever then comes off with just the bolts, the gear lever has a little cup with a two notches in it. As Toyota says - take a rag, push down on the cup and turn CCW. It only takes maybe a 1/8th turn and then it will come up and the lever just pulls out.
Have a couple paper towels or rags to stuff in the holes for when removing the trans nothing falls inside.

After that I just started at the back end of the transmission and disconnected electrical connections. I disconnected 6 total... where I could I left the brackets in place and popped the clip out of the hole.
I used a needle nose vise-grip and channellock pliers in order to squeeze the little tabs and wiggle the plugs loose.








 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think i had photobucket upload problems.I'll see if I can finish it soon...
 

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LOL yes way more Just did mine last month!
 

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Except for getting the first few bolts thru the bell housing going back in I did mine alone over a two day period


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Got it done too by myself. Including:
• URD Torque-U flywheel
• Centerforce Dual-Friction clutch
• URD Throwout Bearing Upgrade/repair kit w/stainless steel sleeve
• Toyota TSB components: slave cylinder and pivot stud
 

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Got it done too by myself. Including:
• URD Torque-U flywheel
• Centerforce Dual-Friction clutch
• URD Throwout Bearing Upgrade/repair kit w/stainless steel sleeve
• Toyota TSB components: slave cylinder and pivot stud
More details about sourcing these parts and actual replacement will be appreciated!
 

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More details about sourcing these parts and actual replacement will be appreciated!
I did the clutch replacement my self 2 months ago following this video
it gives you a pretty much step by step guide on how to do it. I would highly recommend a 36 inch extension for the upper bell housing bolts makes life alot easier. Sourcing the parts listed is all from URD and Toyota . Though you can get them all from rock auto / Toyota as well. Hope that helps.
 

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I did the clutch replacement my self 2 months ago following this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cjg9DMUv56g it gives you a pretty much step by step guide on how to do it. I would highly recommend a 36 inch extension for the upper bell housing bolts makes life alot easier. Sourcing the parts listed is all from URD and Toyota . Though you can get them all from rock auto / Toyota as well. Hope that helps.
Thank you for the information. I have already seen that video.

The 36 inch extension is simple enough to get, but what scares me are the rusty exhaust connections and whether I will be able to manhandle the gearbox from under a truck set up on jackstands in my garage. Any pointers in that sense? How tall does one have to raise the truck to get the gearbox/jack combo out? That height will determine what type of jack to fit under it.
 

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rusty exhaust bolts = cutting wheel (and leather gloves and a face shield on you while you do it)

they come right out when you use the circular tool (and the sparks are pretty, try not to cut the pipe flanges)

if after removal, the pipe flange mating surfaces are also badly rusted, then go at them with a flapper disc, takes only a minute to clean them right up for re-assembly

Buy new bolts made of stainless, or if you use regular carbon steel nuts/bolts, then smear some anti-seize on their threads for easy removal next time (I've been amazed taking apart exhaust fasteners coated with the stuff, even years later, in rusty Michigan).

Norm
 

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rusty exhaust bolts = cutting wheel (and leather gloves and a face shield on you while you do it)

they come right out when you use the circular tool (and the sparks are pretty, try not to cut the pipe flanges)

if after removal, the pipe flange mating surfaces are also badly rusted, then go at them with a flapper disc, takes only a minute to clean them right up for re-assembly

Buy new bolts made of stainless, or if you use regular carbon steel nuts/bolts, then smear some anti-seize on their threads for easy removal next time (I've been amazed taking apart exhaust fasteners coated with the stuff, even years later, in rusty Michigan).

Norm
The extensions arrived today, and the other parts are on order.
 
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