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Discussion Starter #1
With the RCI group buy up, this is the bit of motivation I need to pull the trigger. I'm new to wheeling, and have only had the FJ for 6 months. Have gone out a few times, but nothing too serious as the lack of protection has been a deterrent.

I'm looking for some advice as to what would be best for me. I live in MA, and would probably still be doing 75-80% of my driving on the road. So my question is this; should I just do the full set, or should I choose specific parts (if so which would you recommend given where I'd be wheeling). Also, Steel Vs. Aluminum. Steel is cheaper, Aluminum is lighter and shouldn't rust (rough winters up here with lots of salt). How does the added weight affect the ride?

All advice is very much appreciated.
 

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discussed to the ends of time, steel vs alum. they both work.

ride wont be affected by either.

lots of opinion but i dont think you need gas tank protection.
 

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For what it's worth - I have full skids (ShrockWorks) and there's not one area that hasn't taken a beating. If you're looking for protection, you can't predict where you're going to need it or not need it - so, my advice is the full set.
 

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With the RCI group buy up, this is the bit of motivation I need to pull the trigger. I'm new to wheeling, and have only had the FJ for 6 months. Have gone out a few times, but nothing too serious as the lack of protection has been a deterrent.

I'm looking for some advice as to what would be best for me. I live in MA, and would probably still be doing 75-80% of my driving on the road. So my question is this; should I just do the full set, or should I choose specific parts (if so which would you recommend given where I'd be wheeling). Also, Steel Vs. Aluminum. Steel is cheaper, Aluminum is lighter and shouldn't rust (rough winters up here with lots of salt). How does the added weight affect the ride?

All advice is very much appreciated.
I went with steel because I know I'm going to be bashing it into hard rocks here in Colorado. If you're not going to be doing such wheeling, aluminum would be great for peace of mind since you know it won't "rust".

I can feel the added weight of the steel plates, but it is minimal and, if anything, improves the FJ's ride. It's like having a full-grown adult hanging onto the FJ from underneath. :lol:
 

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For what it's worth - I have full skids (ShrockWorks) and there's not one area that hasn't taken a beating. If you're looking for protection, you can't predict where you're going to need it or not need it - so, my advice is the full set.
I had concluded that I wouldn't need the gas tank skid because of so many recommendations not to get it. Then, when in the shop, it was pointed out to me that there were some pretty significant signs of scrapes on the stock plastic skid plate.

Ended up getting the metal skid, of course.
 

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If you've got rocks, and plan on wheeling in them, get a full set made of steel. If you won't be wheeling in rocks get aluminum, and consider skipping the gas tank skid. The higher cost of the aluminum will pay for itself in fuel savings over the life of the vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
For what it's worth - I have full skids (ShrockWorks) and there's not one area that hasn't taken a beating. If you're looking for protection, you can't predict where you're going to need it or not need it - so, my advice is the full set.
yea that's my thought exactly.. and being that I'm new to it, I'm bound to need it.
 

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I absolutely love my Ricochet Skids, and would definitely recommend buying a full set. I'm on the west coast where rust isn't nearly the issue that you have, so I would probably be fine with steel ones too, but since you are on the east coast, you should definitely go aluminum in my opinion. The fit and finish of the Ricochets are first class, and they are quite durable. I bash mine on rocks fairly regularly, and while steel would probably hold up better, I don't regret my decision one bit!

 

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Discussion Starter #9
If you've got rocks, and plan on wheeling in them, get a full set made of steel. If you won't be wheeling in rocks get aluminum, and consider skipping the gas tank skid. The higher cost of the aluminum will pay for itself in fuel savings over the life of the vehicle.
That too is a very good point. We don't have rocks like you rock crawlers do out west, but the forests are full of boulders in the earth on the trails. I didn't even consider gas mileage... its bad enough as it is. The difference in cost for aluminum is 5 or 6 tanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I absolutely love my Ricochet Skids, and would definitely recommend buying a full set. I'm on the west coast where rust isn't nearly the issue that you have, so I would probably be fine with steel ones too, but since you are on the east coast, you should definitely go aluminum in my opinion. The fit and finish of the Ricochets are first class, and they are quite durable. I bush mine on rocks fairly regularly, and while steel would probably hold up better, I don't regret my decision one bit!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V4zzPc2FV0k
Funny, i watched this video earlier today. thanks man!
 

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Love the ricochet fwiw... Went on effortlessly and the front comes off easy enough for oil changes and alignments...
 

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I went with steel, but maybe I should have done Aluminum instead, I can feel the extra weight, not in bad way, but I know the extra weight is there. In either case, I need to add more protection, lol, I never thought the gas tank skid was actually needed, but given the opinions, and the fact that most of our trails are rocky, i'll grab a set of skids to protect the fuel tank. The only thing i'll do in aluminum would be the front LCA skids from Ricochet, and the gas tank skid from RCI .
 

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I have an overland build. No question I went aluminium complete set minus gas tank. Weight is my Achilles Heal. Every pound counts. IMO.

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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I have Ricochets (the old ones that go over the OEM)

I would jump on the RCI skid deal. Steel is great and they are not THAT much heavier than aluminum. PLUS I really like all the holes in the RCIs. Sure you may get a little hung up if you hit one just right, but I hate dumping all the mud and dirt out of my 'solid' Ricochet set.

Do you have a 10+??? RCI has the oil filter door. No dropping skids to change it. I know it is only a few bolts but what a PITA it can be.

You could even add Ricochet gas tank skids and front LCA skids later on if you want since a steel tank skid would be ridiculously heavy. The OEM plastic thing actually tends to do a decent job.

Dont forget rear LCA armor...one of the most important parts IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have Ricochets (the old ones that go over the OEM)

I would jump on the RCI skid deal. Steel is great and they are not THAT much heavier than aluminum. PLUS I really like all the holes in the RCIs. Sure you may get a little hung up if you hit one just right, but I hate dumping all the mud and dirt out of my 'solid' Ricochet set.

Do you have a 10+??? RCI has the oil filter door. No dropping skids to change it. I know it is only a few bolts but what a PITA it can be.
I'm trying to weight the pluses and minuses of either. If I do Steel I could do powder coat with the money saved from aluminum. If I do Aluminum I don't think I'd spring for the powder coat (though I think it looks way better) but would imagine I would save on gas over time. As I mentioned this is my daily driver and most driving would still be on the road, so I am leaning towards aluminum at this point, but all of your advice has been very helpful.
 

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Yeah aluminum uses anodizing. I personally love the bare aluminum look. I have found that the anodized ones really shed mud and staining better. I had bought front LCA skids anodized black. I wanted silver so I ground all the anodizing off. The backside, still black, cleans up easily. The bare aluminum had a fair bit of southern red mud staining lol. Not a big deal, just something I noticed.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Being that its underneath the truck and all.... I probably shouldn't worry to much about how they look lol
 

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I absolutely love my Ricochet Skids, and would definitely recommend buying a full set. I'm on the west coast where rust isn't nearly the issue that you have, so I would probably be fine with steel ones too, but since you are on the east coast, you should definitely go aluminum in my opinion. The fit and finish of the Ricochets are first class, and they are quite durable. I bash mine on rocks fairly regularly, and while steel would probably hold up better, I don't regret my decision one bit!
This love love love my Ricochet skids, I skipped the gas tank though.
 

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I'm trying to weight the pluses and minuses of either. If I do Steel I could do powder coat with the money saved from aluminum. If I do Aluminum I don't think I'd spring for the powder coat (though I think it looks way better) but would imagine I would save on gas over time. As I mentioned this is my daily driver and most driving would still be on the road, so I am leaning towards aluminum at this point, but all of your advice has been very helpful.
I was in the same exact position as you when ordering skids. Steel is obviously the most durable, and can take a lot of solid rock hits with no problem whatsoever, but I use my rig primarily as my daily driver, and to get to good camping and hiking spots, not to crawl around in the rocks for fun. I have no intention of ever taking my rig into rocks for the sole purpose of being in the rocks, but I did want some protection for when the only way to get to a good camping spot was through some rocks. With that said, the aluminum skids were a no brainer. They save weight, and still offer you plenty of protection for any situation where you are forced to go over rocks. I also went with the gas tank skid, because being out in the middle of nowhere, the last thing I'd want is a solid hit on something puncturing my gas tank and leaving me stranded.

All that being said, if my FJ wasn't my daily driver, I'd have gotten steel skids without a second thought.
 
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